Community Food Bank Inc., dba Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

aka Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona   |   Tucson, AZ   |  www.communityfoodbank.org

Mission

We change lives in the communities we serve by feeding the hungry today and building a healthy, hunger-free tomorrow.

The Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona serves residents in the following counties:
Pima, Cochise, Santa Cruz, Graham, Greenlee.

Ruling year info

1976

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Michael McDonald

Main address

3003 S. Country Club Rd.

Tucson, AZ 85713 USA

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EIN

51-0192519

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Agricultural Programs (K20)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Agency Market

Provides donated food items to non-profit agencies (501c3) that serve food on site, or create a take home package of food for needy individuals and families. The majority of the food for this program comes from local sources such as grocery stores and buying clubs. We also get food from food drives, food manufacturing and shared excess food from food banks across the nation.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Provides a once a month food box to low income individuals and households. The box is comprised of surplus USDA commodities, donated food items from food drives, and local resources. We also purchase certain items that we do not get enough donated, such as peanut butter. We also supplement these boxes with fresh bread and produce as available. These boxes are meant to provide 2 to 3 days of assistance while they are seeking additional assistance. We are contracted with DES to serve Pima, Graham, Greenlee, Cochise, and Santa Cruz Counties.

We provide pre-made Food Boxes to 38 partner sites in Pima County who manage the distribution to clients, and we deliver and handle same day distribution of Food Boxes to 28 cities throughout Graham, Greenlee, Cochise, and Santa Cruz Counties. Our 4 Branch Banks all provide TEFAP Food Boxes plus they all offer a second additional Food Box containing non-USDA items such as excess bread, produce, or store donations.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

CSFP is a partnership between the USDA and PCHD to provide a nutritionally balanced USDA commodities food package once a month to income eligible seniors. Our case load each month is approximately 5,000 seniors. They are eligible to pick up their box at our Country Club facility, numerous housing complexes in Tucson, partner agency locations, or any of our Resource Center locations. Through this program we serve individuals of Pima, Cochise and Santa Cruz counties.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

The garden program is composed of three elements: home gardening program, Nuestra Tierra demonstration garden, and the home garden cooperative. As a community resource, anyone is eligible to sign-up for free, or by donation, to be a member of the home gardening program. Membership gives you access to vegetable seeds, seedlings, compost, garden materials, garden advice and a monthly e-newsletter. Members are encouraged to volunteer, help with installing other home gardens, attend workshops, and educate their local community. There are over 900 current Home Gardening Program members.

The Nuestra Tierra Demonstration Garden is open to the public during business hours, and offers a ¼ acre friendly space to showcase best practices for desert food production, such as sunken veggie beds, drip irrigation, rainwater harvesting, and composting. Approximately 150 people visit the garden each week, and the garden logs 7,000 volunteer hours each year. Workshops on various topics related to home food production are held at the Community Food Bank Nuestra Tierra Garden (as well as Las Milpitas farm) during the fall and spring seasons, and are free to the public (donations suggested). Additional gardening classes at community sites are also held throughout the year, and may be requested by an organization or school group. Vegetables harvested from Nuestra Tierra are sold at Community Food Bank farmers’ markets and sales go back into the program.

Income-qualifying individuals are eligible to be a home garden cooperative member. Members attend three basic gardening classes, complete three gardening workshops and support another home garden installation to become eligible for a "digging party” (garden installation) at their own home, plus one year of continued support. Eligibility follows the same income levels as WIC qualification. There are over 200 home vegetable gardens in Pima County that have been built through this program. Graduates of the Cooperative can become Garden Mentors. Mentors are paired with new cooperative members in their geographic area and provide advice and support through the new member’s first year of gardening.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

The Farmers’ Market program provides a way for food-insecure communities to access fresh, locally-grown nutritious produce. By offering space and consignment sales to local vendors, the markets also provide support for local farmers and gardeners, strengthening our regional food system. We sell a variety of naturally-grown, seasonal fruits and vegetables, eggs, meat, herbs, coffee, honey, and baked goods. Our Farmers’ Markets are the only ones in Southern Arizona which accept WIC, SNAP, and AZFMNP, as well as cash and credit. Our 3 weekly markets are:
• El Pueblo Farm Stand: Monday 3-5pm at the El Pueblo Clinic parking lot, Irvington Rd. and S 6th Ave.
• Community Food Bank Market: Tues 8-12pm at CFB.
• Santa Cruz River Market: Thursday 3-6pm (Oct-Apr), and 4-7pm (May-Sept) at El Mercado San Augustin, 100 S Avenida del Convento

Gardeners and small farmers have an opportunity to sell any amount of unprocessed, naturally-grown produce and eggs at the farmers’ market on consignment. The Farmers’ Market sells their produce and returns 90% of profits to the grower. Any unsold items are considered a donation by the grower and are distributed to our clients as bonus items within the pantry.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Farmers

CCK provides approximately 14,000 nutritious meals per month to those in need in Tucson. These nutritious meals are distributed to 11 meal sites in our community that have agreed to be public walk-in meal sites for the poor, low-income and homeless. The 14,000 meals are prepared by our Culinary Training Program Students under the guidance of our Executive Chef and Sous Chef. Our Culinary Training Program is an integral part of CCK. We enroll 8-10 students into our 10 week free training program, where they work full time 40 hours a week and learn knife skills, culinary math, menu planning, how to create the 5 Mother Sauces, and various cooking techniques. The students also receive instruction on Life Skills which encompasses: how to prepare a resume, job search, interview, budgeting, and more. Potentials students go through a rigorous interview process and must fit our criteria of being low-income, from an at risk population, looking to improve themselves as they may have been incarcerated, in a drug rehab program or unemployed. CCK partners with many local restaurants, resorts, hospitals, casinos, schools and corporations to help in the placement of our students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

The goal of this program is to help children and youth access fresh, locally grown food through their school gardens and cafeterias. Program staff accomplish this by working to reduce policy barriers and also build capacity with teachers, parents, and cafeteria staff. In 2013, we received a Farm-to-School grant from the USDA to partner with Tucson Unified School District, where we are helping a dozen schools maximize their garden production to serve the food in the cafeteria. We provide seasonal school garden trainings, seeds, and seedlings, among other things, to approximately 50 schools. While school gardening is the focus of the program, we also aim to support cafeterias in their efforts to acquire produce from local farmers on a larger scale.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Community Food Bank partnered with City High School and Pima County in 2011 to create Las Milpitas de Cottonwood; an education-based, community-managed farm located on the west bank of the Santa Cruz River, on Cottonwood Ln, south of Silverlake Rd. The surrounding neighborhood residents play a key role in the visioning, planning, construction, and operation at the Farm. Involvement in this space is open to anyone.

The farm offers irrigated sunken-bed garden plots for neighbors to grow food. Each group who wishes to adopt a plot agrees to attend a monthly meeting and pay water costs (currently $6/month). Anyone is welcome to apply, but preference is given based on proximity to the farm and lack of access to home garden space. Las Milpitas also offers community facilities like a shade structures and an outdoor classroom for hosting classes and events (ours or other schools/groups' classes). These ramadas are always available and do not require reservation.

A committee comprised of those interested in the day-to-day operations and future direction of the farm meets regularly to discuss issues, plan events, and provide farm support. This committee is bilingual (English/Spanish) and open to anyone.

Population(s) Served
Adults

GGRC supports community members through SNAP application assistance and family advocacy, SNAP Outreach and training, and family literacy education opportunities.

GGRC has three work stations dedicated to one-on-one assistance on applications for SNAP, AHCCCS, and Cash Assistance as well as one work station dedicated to family advocacy. This provides a way to connect those in need with immediate food assistance, as well as educate the community about assistance programs and connect individuals in need with other programs and services available within the Food Bank and other partner organizations.

SNAP application staff performs outreach visits to pantries, schools, public libraries and events to educate the community about Community Food Bank food assistance resources in addition to processing SNAP applications at designated sites. The GGRC staff also aims to train partner organization staff and volunteers to establish permanent SNAP assistance locations, eventually operating without CFB staff.

GGRC also offers a SNAP Promotora training where committed individuals assist others with SNAP/AHCCCS applications and are educated on food systems and community organizing. Upon completion of the training, promotoras will be equipped to assist those in their community with applications, either from the GGRC office or another site.

The GGRC also teaches an Economic/Family Literacy curriculum to parents who wish to provide better opportunities for their children. Classes are available for groups upon request. Class topics include information about assistance programs and services that are available, nutrition and diet, cultural/family exercises, and community building activities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

School pantries are an emerging trend throughout the Feeding America nation-wide network of food banks. They are intended to alleviate child hunger by providing resources to families at convenient locations. Our goal is to make food assistance and other resources accessible to low-income children and families.

Our first school pantry opened in December 2014 at Wright Elementary School, when an unused office space was converted into a pantry. In April 2015, a client-choice mobile pantry was opened at Dietz Elementary School. In the fall of 2015, the program was expanded to three additional sites in the Tucson Unified School District. Currently, we operate 9 school pantries, including 3 mobile pantries and 2 family resource centers. The School Pantry Program incorporates nutrition education through classes, food demonstrations, and recipe handouts.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The After School Snack program partners with five Tucson Parks and Recreation sites through their KidCo and Inbetweeners Club programs—after-school recreation programs for children ages 5-14. Throughout the school year we provide healthy, after-school snacks five days a week to each site through the USDA at Risk after School Child and Adult Care Food Program, administered state-wide by the Arizona Department of Education. The program’s snack menu uses a four-week, rotational menu that meets ADE and USDA guidelines. Currently, there are 185 kids participating in the After School Snack Program at five Tucson Parks and Recreation sites. The program runs 38 weeks during the school year as well as throughout most school breaks through the Parks and Rec "Schoolzout” program.

In addition, we have partnered with five Boys and Girls Clubs and one Tucson Parks and Recreation Center (Roy Drachman Boys and Girls Club, Steve Daru Boys and Girls Club, Frank and Edith Morton Boys and Girls Club, Jim and Vicki Click Boys and Girls Club, Holmes Tuttle Boys and Girls Club, and Freedom Recreation Center) to provide full healthy meals to children who participate in their programs. Fresh meals are delivered to these sites every day around supper time and are served to the children free of charge by volunteers and program staff. This meal program was made possible through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), which provides federal funding to help supply meals to children in need. Currently approximately 350 suppers per day are served each week day during the school year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Food Bank of the Year - Feeding America 2018

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America 2014

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Partners include nonprofits, civic groups, schools & faith communities co-delivering services in 5 county service-area.

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Equivalent to 1.3% of the workforce's time.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For hunger-relief and/or local food-security/food-system capacity-building at partner agencies. Includes grant dollars as well as in-kind technical assistance.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Represents 15% of 5-county service-area's population, & is a result of poverty, insufficient income & assets, social isolation & barriers to human services, among other social determinants of health.

Dollars invested in local food system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Farmers' Market Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Coronavirus relief funds were invested in the local food system by purchasing from small farmers and matching SNAP and senior benefits at farmers' markets.

Percentage of produce sourced from companies practicing fair trade or socially responsible business practices

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP/Food Box)

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Produce is sourced from Mexico, from companies practicing fair trade or socially responsible business practices, such as providing healthcare and a living wage to workers.

Employee hourly minimum wage

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Arizona's minimum wage is currently $12 per hour.

Percentage of food distributed at school pantries that is fresh produce

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Increase healthy food.
2. Increase food security.
3. Mobilize and inspire the public.
4. Responsibly increase and leverage resources.
5. Inspire staff and volunteer confidence and support.
6. Increase reach.

Increase healthy food
Reduce our service area's "meal gap"
Increase access and distribution of fresh produce
Strengthen mutually beneficial agency partner relationships
Strengthen retail store program partnerships
Expand child feeding programs
Increase food security
Serve as a resource to increase local food production
Identify, implement, and evaluate poverty reduction interventions
Promote community self-reliance through education and advocacy
Strengthen our "shorten-the-line" strategies & programs
Mobilize and inspire the public
Improve our donor retention rate and average gift size
Ensure timely and ongoing communication of our mission and financial performance
Take action on the findings of our brand perception survey
Engage elected officials and community leaders in our mission
Improve the education of and engagement with our advisory boards
Responsibly increase and leverage resources
Build our resource-development capacity
Optimize the double bottom-line of mission & margin returns of our fundraising events
Build our program evaluation capacity to better manage our double bottom-line and to ensure strategic investment & growth
Develop opportunities for entrepreneurial, mission-related earned-revenue
Identify and implement operational and staffing efficiencies to improve bottom-line
Inspire staff and volunteer confidence and support
Continue to operationalize our organizational values
Engage Board in education and assessment of our programs
Utilize mission performance dashboard
Invest in professional development, and succession plans
Engage volunteers in meaningful and needed work
Maintain AIB food-safety compliance and develop overall safe work-place capacity
Increase reach
Survey client and community needs to identify service gaps and opportunities
Increase service in underserved areas, including use of the Willcox Distribution Center
Evaluate performance and build capacity of agency and community partners
Pursue new partnerships in the areas of healthcare; child & senior feeding; and community-wide poverty-reduction

20 diversely skilled, community representative volunteer Board members
150 diversely skilled FTE food logistics, food-security, resource-development, finance, and support-service professionals
95 annualized FTEs of community volunteers
8 hub facilities, supporting some 400 partner agencies with a combined 500+ service sites across 23,000 square mile 5-county area (size of West Virginia)
Sustainable, scalable, diverse revenue streams
Best-in-class AIB food-safety rating

FY 2015 performance per indicator:

A. 78% of all our distributed food in 11 "healthy food" categories
B. 1,245,845 SNAP meals provided
C. 12,836 people receiving nutrition and/or food-production education
D. 1,344,984 servings of local fruits, vegetables, and/or eggs provided
E. Private support subsidized 100% of our cash-basis operating expenses
F. 82.4% of our total fundraising support comes from individuals
G. Clients in SE AZ counties received 142.15 lbs of food per person
H. 2.53 meals were distributed per dollar of support, not including stats in C &D above
I. Not counting the value of donated food, 80% of a dollar went to programs. With food, 96%
J. 8,043,166 lbs worth of food was locally sourced
K. We have 22.30 donors per 1000 people in Southern Arizona
L. We invested 2,816 hours in training and professional-development organization-wide

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Food-insecure individuals, households, communities. The underlying causes of food-insecurity may be temporary, but are often chronic and have everything to do with racialized socioeconomic structural disparities and inequities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Based upon community member and program participant (client) input, our organization is a member-sponsor of a community coalition "Fight for $15" minimum wage ballot initiative within the major city of our 5-county service-area.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    With a long history of community organizing - as well as recent organization-wide commitments to IDEA (inclusion, diversity, equity, access/accountability) - our organization's power is increasingly shifting to centering and prioritizing program participant (client) voice and perspective about relevant needs and community-centric solutions and our organization's most relevant and value-added role.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Community Food Bank Inc., dba Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Community Food Bank Inc., dba Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Lauryn Bianco

VP Operations & Philanthropy, EMERGE

Term: 2020 - 2022

Greg Kishi

IBM - Senior Technical Staff Engineer

Katie Maxwell

University of Arizona - Dept. of Accounting

Steve Banzhaf

Retired - Formerly Bank of America

Gary Becker

retired, American Board of Radiology

Lauryn Bianco

Hope, Inc. - Director of Development & Community Outreach

Cathy Bradley

TEP - Director of Human Resources

Lyle Ford

Community Partnership Care Coordination - Rally Point Tucson Supervisor

Robert Mohelnitzky

Community Volunteer

Doug Taren

University of Arizona - College of Public Health - Professor & Associate Dean

Andres Valenzuela

Canyon Ranch - Dietitian

Chris Shea

retired General Mills executive

Marty Pruitt

Community Food Bank ambassador and client representative

Erika Jaramillo

Commander/Wing Officer, Arizona Air National Guard

Nathan Rothschild

attorney

Susan Barrable

retired publishing executive

Brad Smith

aerospace executive

Susan Lange

health care executive

Jesus Garcia

environmental educator

Lydia Hunter

CPA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/6/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability