National Low Income Housing Coalition

aka NLIHC   |   Washington, DC   |  https://www.nlihc.org

Mission

The National Low Income Housing Coalition is dedicated to achieving racially and socially equitable public policy that ensures people with the lowest incomes have quality homes that are accessible and affordable in communities of their choice. Our goals are to preserve existing federally assisted homes and housing resources, expand the supply of low income housing, and establish housing stability as the primary purpose of federal low income housing policy.

Ruling year info

1979

President and CEO

Ms. Diane Yentel

Main address

1000 Vermont Avenue NW Suite 500

Washington, DC 20005 USA

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EIN

52-1089824

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (L05)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Overarching Objectives/Strategies

NLIHC advocates for racially and socially equitable public policies that that ensure the lowest-income people in America have quality homes that are accessible and affordable in communities of their choice. We work solely on the behalf of low-income renters and do not represent any segment of the housing industry. Our policy priorities are to bridge the gap between incomes and housing costs by expanding rental assistance; to expand and preserve the supply of rental homes affordable and accessible to people with the lowest incomes; to create a permanent national housing stabilization fund to prevent evictions; to establish and enforce key renter protections; to ensure that federal disaster recovery programs are fair and equitable and promote equitable access to affordable housing.

Preserving and expanding affordable housing for the lowest-income households and ensuring their housing stability are critical to ending U.S. homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Social and economic status

NLIHC is leading efforts to ensure the $46B in Treasury ERA approved by Congress gets to people in dire need. While over millions of households still have rental arrears, many state and local ERA programs have been very slow in getting the resources to landlords and renters, are not engaging in sufficient outreach/communications, are requiring overly burdensome documentation, and are not employing direct-to-tenant assistance. NLIHC launched in 2021 an "End Rental Arrears to Stop Evictions" (ERASE) project, to prevent evictions by tracking and analyzing ERA utilization; documenting and sharing best practices and tools; influencing program designs at federal, state, local levels; developing key partnerships for outreach and education; and more. We developed and are sharing an ERA programs look-up tool (https://bit.ly/3xzlTe7), a Dashboard (https://bit.ly/3xrbCR8) on ERA spending and use of best practices, and an ERA Resource Hub (https://bit.ly/3k5EmLo) of models programs across the U.S.

Population(s) Served

Led by NLIHC, the HoUSed campaign (https://nlihc.org/housed) strives to advance anti-racist policies and achieve the large-scale, sustained investments and reforms necessary to ensure that renters with the lowest incomes have an affordable place to call home. More than ever, bold solutions are needed to ensure people with the lowest incomes and those most marginalized have stable, affordable homes. The HoUSed campaign focuses on mobilizing tens of thousands of housing advocates, including over 1,800 organizations signing onto the campaign, to:

1. Bridge the gap between incomes and housing costs by expanding rental assistance to every eligible household.
2. Expand and preserve the supply of rental homes affordable and accessible to people with the lowest incomes.
3. Provide emergency rental assistance to households in crisis by creating a national housing stabilization fund.
4. Strengthen and enforce renter protections.

Population(s) Served

The NLIHC-led Opportunity Starts at Home (OSAH) multi-sector affordable homes campaign's long-term goal is:

Through federal housing policies that expand resources and correct long-standing structural and racial inequities, we will ensure that people with the lowest incomes can afford a good home, which adds to their quality of life through better health, greater educational attainment, and better earnings.

OSAH is advised by a Steering Committee of leading national organizations representing a wide range of sectors that are working together to solve the housing affordability crisis. What is unprecedented and transformative about OSAH is the scope and diversity of the partners joining forces to advocate for more robust and equitable federal housing policies. Each bring their own perspectives and concerns, but all share the belief that their goals are inextricably linked to whether people have access to quality affordable homes in thriving neighborhoods.

www.opportunityhome.org

Population(s) Served

The NLIHC-led Disaster Housing Recovery Coalition (DHRC) consists of more than 850 national, state, and local organizations engaged in disaster housing recovery. Major disasters (e.g. hurricanes and wildfires) are becoming increasingly more frequent and are devastating for people with the lowest incomes, who are least able to evacuate prior to the disaster and have the fewest resources to recover, leaving too many housing insecure or homeless. The DHRC educates policymakers and the public on current inequities in the disaster housing recovery system and to achieve changes to programs and policies to make them more equitable and to ensure the needs of people with the lowest incomes are met. Broadly, the DHRC’s disaster housing recovery efforts are to ensure recovery solutions provide equitable assistance to low-income and other marginalized people and communities.

https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/projects-campaigns/disaster-housing-recovery

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Social and economic status
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Social and economic status
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Social and economic status
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Social and economic status
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Social and economic status

The Annual Housing Policy Forum explores challenges and opportunities in the affordable housing community and the best strategies for achieving positive affordable housing policy solutions. The Forum and state partner convenings provide the opportunity for critical learning and capacity-building on the challenges and solutions to ending the housing crisis and homelessness in America. Participants have opportunities to engage with and learn from thought-leaders, policy experts, researchers, affordable housing practitioners, low-income residents, and leaders from Capitol Hill about the state of the affordable housing crisis in America and its solutions.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status
People with disabilities
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status
People with disabilities
Age groups

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Even before the coronavirus pandemic, America was in the grips of an affordable housing crisis, most severely impacting people with the lowest incomes and people of color. Nearly eight million of the lowest-income renters pay at least half of their incomes on rent and have inadequate resources for other basic needs (the definition of “housing poverty”), but despite the clear and urgent need, only one in four households who qualify for housing assistance receives it due to decades of chronic underfunding by Congress. Millions of eligible households remain on waiting lists -- often waiting years -- to receive assistance, and most never do. Nearly 600,000 people are homeless on any given night.

Our goals are to: 1) Preserve existing federally assisted homes and housing resources. 2) Expand the supply of low-income housing affordable and accessible to the lowest-income households. 3) Establish housing stability as the primary purpose of federal housing solutions. Preserving and expanding affordable housing for the lowest-income households and ensuring their housing stability are critical to ending U.S. homelessness – we can end homelessness if we provide those most in need with stable, affordable homes.

Our main areas of activity include: affordable housing research; policy analysis and advancement; outreach, organizing, and capacity-building; and communications (media, social media, briefings, etc.) and education. We collaborate closely with state housing and homelessness coalition partners in 43 states and DC and engage them through capacity-building and trainings, peer sharing and learning, working groups, and campaigns. We have a much larger membership base with whom we communicate frequently and an even larger contact list (approximately 150,000 individuals) whom we engage in education, organizing and mobilization efforts.

A few of our key programs currently include:

• The End Rental Arrears to Stop Evictions (ERASE) project to ensure historic emergency rental assistance (ERA) gets to the lowest-income and most marginalized renters and people without homes equitably and efficiently: https://nlihc.org/erase-project & https://nlihc.org/coronavirus-and-housing-homelessness
• The HoUSed Campaign to achieve anti-racist, long-term, universal, stable, affordable housing solutions for those most in need: https://nlihc.org/housed
• The Opportunity Starts at Home multi-sector affordable homes campaign: https://www.opportunityhome.org/
• The Our Homes, Our Votes nonpartisan candidate and low-income renter civic engagement project: https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/projects-campaigns/our-homes-our-votes
• The Disaster Housing Recovery Coalition efforts to ensure recovery solutions provide equitable assistance to low-income and other marginalized people and communities: https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/projects-campaigns/disaster-housing-recovery

NLIHC OVERARCHING OBJECTIVES/STRATEGIES:
1: Change public and decision-maker awareness and opinion through communications and media outreach, social media and other forms of awareness-building of our high-quality research and analysis and our deep expertise that get featured in thousands of media articles and TV and radio programs. NLIHC media reach has grown phenomenally in recent years, from about 2,000 media stories (print/online/TV/radio) citing NLIHC expertise and research in 2016 to over 14,000 this year, reaching tens of millions of readers/viewers.
2: Increase capacity of low-income housing stakeholders and engage them in nonpartisan campaigns to promote anti-racist affordable housing solutions though trainings, webinars, working groups, calls-to-action, sign-on efforts, and other mobilization efforts.
3: Encourage national decision makers to act - through grassroots and direct communications efforts; policy analysis, meetings and briefings; the development and provision of solutions; and sharing the results of our sound, unbiased research analysis. National decision-makers identify NLIHC as the go-to resource for advice and expertise on solutions for the nation’s affordable housing crisis.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    NLIHC exclusively focuses on the housing needs of extremely low-income (ELI) households (those with incomes at or below the poverty level or 30% of area median income, including people experiencing homelessness), more than 70% of whom are severely housing cost-burdened, spending more than half of their incomes on housing. ELI households are disproportionately BIPOC, seniors, and people with disabilities. They are also the only group for which there is an absolute shortage of affordable homes nationwide. The beneficiaries of all NLIHC’s efforts are the 10.8 million extremely low-income renter households in the U.S who face a shortage of nearly 7 million affordable and available rental homes nationwide.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Tenant-led publication,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To identify policy issues of importance and how to address them, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    For many years, NLIHC has released a twice-annual publication called Tenant Talk, a magazine is for low-income renters/tenants that connects with residents on the housing issues affecting their lives. Tenant Talk covers issues of importance to low-income residents, like Section 3 employment/contracting requirements, housing rights for people with disabilities, fair housing/housing discrimination, public housing and housing vouchers, and disaster housing recovery. The editorial board of Tenant Talk are the six low-income residents on NLIHC's board of directors, and each issue features articles by people with lived experience. See: https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/publications-research/tenant-talk.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners, Policymakers,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    As NLIHC seeks to defend federal affordable housing programs and work for their expansion, we recognize that the voices of public housing residents, residents in other federally subsidized housing, voucher holders, and those in need of such assistance are essential. In 2019, NLIHC began hosting “Tenant Talk Live” – a now monthly call/webinar with and by renters, people without homes, and resident leaders from across the country. On each call, NLIHC provides opportunities for residents to connect with NLIHC and one another; to share best practices; and to learn how to be more involved in influencing national housing solutions and to lead in their communities. An example of a recent Tenant Talk Live can be found at: www.youtu.be/di9pkF0MFq8

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

National Low Income Housing Coalition
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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National Low Income Housing Coalition

Board of directors
as of 11/23/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Marla Newman

City of Winston-Salem Community Development Department

Term: 2019 - 2021

Dara Baldwin

Center for Disability Rights, Inc

Emma Clifford

Oglala Sioux Tribe Partnership for Housing

Lot Diaz

Unidos US

Chris Estes

Wake Partnership to End Homelessness

Daisy Franklin

Public Housing Resident Network

Dora Gallo

A Community of Friends

Deidre Gilmore

Moises Loza

Rachael Myers

Washington Low Income Housing Alliance

Ann O'Hara

Technical Assistance Collaborative

Bob Palmer

Housing Action Illinois

Eric Price

AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust

Nan Roman

National Alliance to End Homelessness

Michael Steele

Rutgers Houses Resident Association

Martha Weatherspoon

Lincoln Home Resident Council

Russell Bennett

Collaborative Solutions, Inc.

Yanira Cortes

Aaron Gornstein

Preservation of Affordable Housing (POAH)

Chrishelle Palay

Houston Organizing Movement for Equity (HOME) Coalition

Erhard Mahnke

Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition

Shalonda Rivers

22nd Avenue Apartments Cordoba Association

Karlo Ng

National Housing Law Project

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/23/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data