ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families

Early Connections Last a Lifetime

aka ZERO TO THREE   |   Washington, DC   |  www.zerotothree.org

Mission

Our mission is to ensure that all babies and toddlers have a strong start in life. At ZERO TO THREE, we envision a society that has the knowledge and will to support all infants and toddlers in reaching their full potential.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Mr. Matthew E. Melmed

Main address

2445 M Street, NW Suite 600

Washington, DC 20037 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1105189

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our overarching goal to transform society so that all infants and toddlers have emotionally nourishing relationships; live in strong families and healthy communities; experience greater equity and fewer disparities that previous generations; are resilient in the wake of adverse events; thrive emotionally, socially, cognitively, linguistically, and physically; and develop the foundation for lifelong health and well-being. To this end, we work to ensure key audiences understand and embrace their unique roles in supporting infants and toddlers. By supporting the caring adults who touch the lives of young children we enhance their abilities to ensure that all infants have a strong start in life. Parents/families/caregivers: -better understand how they can foster the well-being and healthy development of their infant and toddlers; -become more responsive and engaged in interactions with their children; and -will have stronger, more secure relationships with their children. Professionals: -expand their knowledge of the needs of expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families, and the best practices within their professional contexts for meeting those needs; -enhance their competencies in partnering with parents and implementing best practices; and -are part of a more highly skilled and knowledgeable workforce that has the capacity to meet the diverse needs of expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families. Policymakers (federal/state/local; and legislative/administrative), advocates, and the general public: -more fully recognize the benefits of supporting expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families, and the positive role policy can play in doing so; -actively pursue policies that provide for better funded systems, services, and supports to benefit expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families; and -create well-funded, more responsive public policies that ensure access to a comprehensive, cohesive system of high-quality supports focused on the earliest years.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning (NC ECDTL)

The NC ECDTL approach is carried out by a consortia comprised of seven partner organizations – ZERO TO THREE; University of North Carolina; University of Washington; University of Denver; WestEd; Child Care Aware of America; and Applied Engineering Management Corporation.

The goal of the NC ECDTL is to identify, develop, and promote the implementation of evidence-based practices that are culturally and linguistically responsive and lead to positive child outcomes across birth to five early childhood programs, and to support strong professional development systems.

The NC ECDTL aims to impact the training and technical assistance needs of Head Start and child care programs and systems. The goal of the NC ECDTL is to identify, develop, and promote the implementation of evidence-based practices that are culturally and linguistically responsive and lead to positive child outcomes across birth to five early childhood programs, and to support strong professional development systems.

As the prime partner, ZERO TO THREE, is responsible for setting the overall direction for the center and providing leadership as we work towards addressing the goals of the center. The NC ECDTL is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start and Office of Child Care.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

HealthySteps, a signature program of ZERO TO THREE, is an evidence-based, interdisciplinary pediatric primary care program that promotes positive parenting and healthy development for babies and toddlers, with an emphasis on families living in low-income communities. The entire practice works together to implement the HealthySteps model, with leadership from a Physician Champion and a child development professional, known as a HealthySteps Specialist, integrated into the primary care team. HealthySteps Specialists connect with and guide families during and between well-child visits. They provide tailored support for common and complex concerns that physicians often lack time to address, such as: behavior, sleep, feeding, attachment, parental depression, social determinants of health, and adapting to life with a baby or toddler. A multi-site randomized controlled trial, as well as other more recent site-level studies of HealthySteps, have demonstrated positive outcomes for children, their families, and the physicians and practices that serve them.

Currently, 146 pediatric and family medicine practices across the country have implemented HealthySteps, reaching more than 144,000 children ages birth to three each year. ZERO TO THREE’s goal is to reach more than 1 million children annually by 2032, focusing on vulnerable families.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

PATH supports Tribal Home Visiting and Tribal Early Learning Initiative (TELI) grantees by increasing their capacity to implement high quality, home visiting programs with tribal communities and develop integrated early childhood systems serving American Indian and Alaska Native families.

Technical assistance to tribal grantees is delivered through a relationship-based approach aimed at meeting grantees wherever they are in program development and supporting them in addressing challenges, improving performance and enhancing their home visiting program delivery.
The project is funded through the Administration for Children and Families and works in partnership with the Arizona State University Office of American Indian Projects. The PATH team supports grantees through a variety of technical assistance activities including virtual and in-person individualized learning activities, facilitating peer sharing and group learning events and developing tools and resources to support grantee efforts.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Indigenous peoples

The ZERO TO THREE Fellowship is committed enhancing the leadership skills of a broad diversity of professionals who have the passion to support all infants and toddlers in reaching their full potential. This program is comprised of an 18-month Fellowship experience and the Academy of ZERO TO THREE Fellows – an alumni network of more than 300 Fellowship graduates.

Each class of Fellows is comprised of 10-15 early multi-disciplinary professionals from a range of career stages and sectors who are emerging and mid-career leaders within their professional spheres and have a vision and desire for transformational change in the larger community. During the Fellowship experience, participants engage in individual and group experiences (e.g., retreats, coaching/mentoring, relationship-building and networking events, conferences, professional meetings) to enhance their knowledge, skills, and confidence as advocates and visionary leaders.

The Academy helps to sustain Fellows connected to their ever-expanding networks and peers, and provides opportunity for collaboration, peer support, and continuing education and inspiration as leaders.

Launched in 1981, our Fellowship is the preeminent leadership development program focused on infants and toddlers

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

ZERO TO THREE is proud to support military families and was the first major organization to highlight the experiences of military-connected families from the perspective of the youngest family members. We work to increase awareness and collaboration throughout the military and civilian communities so that parents and professionals can more effectively care for very young children and their families. Projects that support the health and development of infants, toddlers and their families through the unique experiences and circumstances of active military and veteran families include:

• Coming Together Around Military Families, which offers parents quick tips on supporting their young child from common issues military families face, including relocation, reunification, stress and behavior, routines, and the importance of self-care.

• Our board books Over There and Home Again that help very young children understand a parent’s absence during deployment and return home with visible and invisible injury.

• Our mobile app Babies on the Homefront that helps to keep parents and their extended families engaged with their children and each other during deployment separation

• Baby Brigade, our psychoeducational curriculum for veteran parents and their partners to support their children’s healthy growth and development, each other, and their peer veteran/parents of young children – as well as building supportive connections in the community while adjusting to civilian life.

MFP works to ensure military and civilian professionals who support military families have the knowledge and the tools needed for their work. Training includes webinars and conferences, as well as providing curricula and guidance for Army New Parent Support Home Visitors across the globe and Family Advocacy professionals across all military branches of service.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

ZERO TO THREE’s Parenting Resources department creates dynamic resources in a variety of media (video, podcast, e-newsletter, web-based resources, curricula, and more) that translate the science base around parenting into practical strategies that parents and primary caregivers can use with the infants and toddlers in their lives. We “meet parents where they are” by developing Plain Language (low literacy) bilingual resources that are shared and promoted via ZERO TO THREE and their wide network of parents and professional partners in the early childhood field. Topics include early brain development, managing challenging behavior and limit-setting, how to promote school readiness by age five, supporting grandparents as caregivers, and more.

Our approach to supporting parents is based on the belief that parents are the true experts on their children, and that there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach to child-rearing, since every child is nested within an individual circle of relationships, community, and culture. The information and tools we offer are designed to support parents in developing their own (research-based) approaches to promoting their children’s healthy development.

The Parenting Resources department also leads the organization’s efforts in developing and administering ZERO TO THREE’s national parent and grandparent surveys. These surveys allow us to learn directly from representative samples of parents what they know about parenting, what they want to know, where they seek parenting information, and how they use this information in their child-rearing. Findings from these surveys inform our work and the work of the larger early childhood field so that collectively, we can address parents’ information gaps and provide the information and resources they are seeking. Survey findings also provide a critical context to build the understanding of policymakers, advocates and the public into the everyday challenges and dilemmas faced by Millennial and Generation Z parents.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center’s goal is to make every baby a national priority. We are the leading national voice for infants and toddlers and the source of a comprehensive infant/family nonpartisan policy agenda for federal, state, and community policymakers and advocates. The Policy Center provides tools, resources, information, training, and technical assistance to the public, advocates, and policymakers at all levels so they can build policies on the science of brain development and make budget decisions that put babies and families first. Our agenda is simple: The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center promotes good health, strong families, and positive early learning experiences for all infants and toddlers, with special emphasis on those who are the most vulnerable and in need. Signature projects of the Policy Center include Think Babies (thinkbabies.org) which brings nationwide attention to what babies and families need to thrive and works to make the potential of every baby a national priority; and The State of Babies Yearbook (stateofbabies.org) which compiles data on nearly 60 indicators—specifically for children ages 0 to 3—to measure national and state progress towards assuring access to healthcare, paid family leave, quality education, and more.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

ZERO TO THREE's professional development opportunities elevate the knowledge, skills, and abilities of the early childhood development field. More than 15,000 early childhood providers worldwide rely on ZERO TO THREE’s research-informed and competency-based professional development each year. Our experts bring together the perspectives of many fields, and our expertise is rooted in all domains of child development—social, emotional, intellectual, lingual and physical. We develop pioneering products and services such as ZERO TO THREE’s Critical Competencies for Infant-Toddler Educators™ and provides customized Technical Assistance to states and communities. Our experts use their diverse and extensive experience to take an innovative approach that: •Focuses on the range of early childhood workforce characteristics and specific professional needs; •Is grounded in research about the professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to promote positive child outcomes; •Supports vulnerable populations and multi-language learners; •Leverages implementation and improvement science to help ensure real and lasting impacts; and •Offers a global perspective while honoring unique context.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

Safe Babies Court Teams are changing the trajectory for infants and toddlers in foster care. Families are embraced by a team and given targeted and timely services. The adults feel valued as individuals and as parents while they learn how to support the healthy development of their children.

We lead efforts to share information and build knowledge to help ensure that local jurisdictions and states have the tools necessary to identify and address the underlying challenges faced by families in the child welfare system and to ensure that infants, toddlers, and families have access to high-quality, evidence-based services. More than 50 sites across the country are implementing the Safe Babies Court Teams approach and another 20 are in beginning discussions or assessment to determine community readiness to implement an Infant-Toddler Court.

The Safe Babies Court Team approach is developing a significant evidence base and has been recognized in the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare as an intervention with promising results. To date, four evaluations have been conducted. Results show that Children in Safe Babies Court Teams had longer-term placements and significantly higher child safety outcomes. These children exit the foster care system approximately one year earlier than their peers not served by SBCT, reach permanency approximate one year faster, and are more likely to reach permanency with a member of their biological family. Safe Babies Court Teams have achieved positive safety outcomes, with 99.05% of the infants and toddlers served are protected from further maltreatment.

The Infant-Toddler Court Teams (previously Quality Improvement Center for Research-Based Infant-Toddler Court Teams – or QIC-CT) is funded by the United States Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children’s Bureau. ITCP is operated by ZERO TO THREE and its partners, the Center for the Study of Social Policy, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, and RTI International.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

ZERO TO THREE’s California Initiative, established in 2004 in Los Angeles, has enhanced the knowledge and skills of LA County and CA professionals who care for very young children and their families. The California Initiative plays an essential role in building collaboration and partnerships among early childhood professionals, those who inform policies and systems change, and parents and families across Los Angeles and California. The work of our California Initiative strengthens the capacity of early childhood professionals to engage in cross-sector collaborative efforts, supports parents with practical and easily accessible resources, and informs policies and systems change efforts that contribute to California infants’ and toddlers’ healthy development. As the only national organization with a regional office located in California dedicated to infants and toddlers and with the capacity to work with parents, professionals and policymakers to advance the health and wellness of babies and toddlers, ZTT’s local presence speaks to the importance of infants and toddlers – and all who care for them – in our nation’s largest state.

A signature program of ZERO TO THREE’s California Initiative, P-5 Cross-Sector Core Competencies Training is designed to bring these competencies directly to professionals serving the P-5 population, in order enhance capacity for coordinated, collaborative service delivery. The ZERO TO THREE California Initiative partnered with First 5 LA to develop the Prenatal to Age 5 Workforce Development (P-5WFD) Project in response to the need for cross-sector coordination of services for the P- 5 population. The P-5 WFD Project developed the P-5 Cross-Sector Core Competencies that identify the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for the professionals working with the P-5 population. The cross-sector core competencies focus on eight core competency domains essential for all professionals in the P-5 field. These domains include: Early Childhood Development; Family-Centered Practice; Relationship-Based Practice; Health and Development Risk and Protective Factors; Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness; Leadership to Meet Family Needs and Improve Services and Systems; Professional and Ethical Practices; and Service Planning, Coordination, and Collaboration. The P-5 Cross-Sector Core Competencies Training is designed to bring these competencies directly to professionals serving the P-5 population, in order to enhance capacity for coordinated, collaborative service delivery.

Our efforts result in an engaged early-childhood workforce with shared knowledge, skills, and attitudes; a more informed public sector that recognizes the benefit of responsive policies; and parents and caregivers with the knowledge and confidence to advance the well-being and healthy development of their infants and toddlers.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

UMass Donahue Institute, along with its partners Family Health International 360, ZERO TO THREE, and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Anderson School of Management, serve as the Head Start National Center on Program Management and Fiscal Operations.

The Head Start National Center on Program Management and Fiscal Operations (PMFO) disseminates clear, consistent messages on Office of Head Start priorities for the development and implementation of sound management systems and strong internal controls for all Head Start grantees. The Center’s efforts to support well-managed systems for early care and education include topics such as:
•Governance
•Facilities and transportation
•Leadership development
•Human resources
•Data collection and analysis
•Ongoing monitoring and self-assessment
•Program planning
•Recordkeeping and reporting
•Budgeting
•Communication

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of ZERO TO THREE professional development trainings conducted during the fiscal year (October 1 through September 30)

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total attendance at professional development trainings/workshops/sessions during the fiscal year (October 1 through September 30)

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total ZERO TO THREE membership by the end of the fiscal year (ending September 30). Memberships began in July 2016.

Number of audience members willing to take action on behalf of a specific issue

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of ZERO TO THREE Policy Network members by the end of the fiscal year (ending September 30)

Number of media articles reflecting preferred issue framing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of earned media hits during the fiscal year (October 1 through September 30)

Number of downloads of the organization's materials and explanations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of resource downloads during the fiscal year (October 1 through September 30). FY16 count began May 3, 2016 with launch of our new website.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our overarching goal to transform society so that all infants and toddlers have emotionally nourishing relationships; live in strong families and healthy communities; experience greater equity and fewer disparities that previous generations; are resilient in the wake of adverse events; thrive emotionally, socially, cognitively, linguistically, and physically; and develop the foundation for lifelong health and well-being.

To this end, we work to ensure that our key audiences understand and embrace their unique roles in supporting infants and toddlers. By supporting the caring adults who touch the lives of infants and toddlers, we increase their knowledge and know how to ensure that all infants have a strong start in life.

Parents/families/caregivers:
-better understand how they can foster the well-being and healthy development of their infant and toddlers;
-become more responsive and engaged in interactions with their children; and
-will have stronger, more secure relationships with their children.

Professionals:
-expand their knowledge of the needs of expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families, and the best practices for meeting those needs;
-enhance their competencies in partnering with parents and implementing best practices; and
-are part of a more highly skilled and knowledgeable workforce that has the capacity to meet the diverse needs of expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families.

Policymakers (federal/state/local; and legislative/administrative), advocates, and the general public:
-more fully recognize the benefits of supporting expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families, and the positive role policy can play in doing so;
-actively pursue policies that provide for better funded systems, services, and supports to benefit expectant parents, infants, toddlers, and families; and
-create well-funded, more responsive public policies that ensure access to a comprehensive, cohesive system of high-quality supports focused on the earliest years.

In all our work, we strive to be evidence-based, multidisciplinary, comprehensive, respectful, reflective, and relationship-based. Through our varied programs and projects, we provide our target audiences the knowledge and know-how to nurture early development by:
-Offering information and strategies to parents/caregivers to strengthen bonds with children and address common challenges
-Providing professionals with training, technical assistance, and resources that translate research into practice to inform their work with families, especially those experiencing adversity
-Collaborating with policymakers to adopt policies, fund programs, and build comprehensive early childhood systems
-Mobilizing advocates and educating the public to advance policies that better meet the needs of infants, toddlers, and families
-Cultivating early childhood leaders
Partnering with nonprofit, academic, corporate, and government organizations

Founded in 1977, ZTT has a long-standing reputation as the leading organization focused on children from birth to 3 years of age-within a prenatal to age 8 developmental framework. We bring strong core values, the passion and persistence in helping infants and toddlers thrive, and the highest standards of excellence in our work.

We translate science and evidence-based/best practices into resources, tools, and responsive policies for millions of parents, professionals, and policymakers. Our Board of Directors is comprised of leading researchers and early childhood practitioners who inform our efforts with the most up-to-date science and practices to ensure that babies and toddlers receive the greatest benefit from family and community connections critical to their well-being and healthy development. Our staff and fellows bring multidisciplinary and cross-sector expertise to develop practical, effective, and accessible tools and resources, and we partner with nonprofit, academic, corporate, and government organizations, as well as with established networks to deliver information, tools and resources to a wide and diverse audience.

Our research and evaluation team grounds our work in outcomes and assists in project impact measurement. We continually solicit feedback from our primary audiences to learn what they want and need, how they prefer to receive information and resources, and how effectively we meet those needs, and then apply those lessons learned to refine and inform our efforts.

As a national leader, we continue to raise awareness of the importance of the first three years of life, bring attention to how current events (e.g., wide usage of digital devices and children’s screen-time, natural disasters, etc.) affect young children, identify new strategies and approaches for serving very young children and their families, and strengthen partnerships and foster collaboration across the field. For example:
-We co-developed and released the State of Babies Yearbook: 2019 that tells the national and state-by-state story of how America’s babies are faring by examining childhood indicator data. The State of Babies Yearbook provides necessary information for policymakers, advocates, professionals, families, and the public to make informed decisions to improve the lives of babies and toddlers.
-Programs such as HealthySteps and Safe Babies Court Teams are increasing in scale to reach and support larger numbers of infants and toddlers and their families.
-As we continue to develop, test, and disseminate unique curricula, tools, and resources, we are also increasing available tailored information and tools for audiences such military families, grandparents, friend/family/neighbor caregivers, first responders, and other important adults in children's lives
-We provide workforce development training and technical assistance to thousands of early childhood professionals in a variety of fields on cutting-edge research and practice in areas such as brain development, child care, and school readiness.
-As we are increasingly sought by the media for expert information and opinion, public recognition of our work is also growing – which allows us to reach more families and the professionals who serve them.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families

Board of directors
as of 03/16/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Brenda Jones Harden

University of Maryland

Paul Spicer

Professor of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma

Walter Gilliam

Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychology, Yale University Child Study Center; Director, Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy

Mary Margaret Gleason

Division Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Eastern Virginia Medical School; Vice Chief of Mental Health Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters

Brenda Jones Harden

Richman Professor for Children and Families, School of Social Work University of Maryland

Lisa Mennet

Founder, Perigee Fund

Andrew Meltzoff

Co-Director, Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, University of Washington

Catherine Monk

Associate Professor of Medical Psychology (in Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology) Columbia University

Michael Olenick

President & CEO, Child Care Resource Center

Eugene Stein

President & CEO, Tikun Olam Foundation

Barbara Thompson

Retired, former Director Office of Family Readiness Policy Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense

Chandra Ghosh Ippen

Associate Director of the Child Trauma Research Program, University of California, San Francisco

Michelle Meyercord

Director, Stephen A. Schwarzman Foundation

Marcel Wright

Vice President, Behavioral Health Services, Adventist Healthcare

Lee Beers

Medical Director, Community Health and Advocacy Children’s National Hospital

Felicia DeHaney

Director of Program and Strategy W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Jon Korfmacher

Senior Research Fellow, Chapin Hall, University of Chicago

Joy Osofsky

Paul J. Ramsay Chair of Psychiatry, Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry; Barbara Lemann Professor of Child Welfare; Director of the Harris Center for Infant Mental Health Center

Helen Raikes

Willa Cather Professor Emeritus of Child, Youth, and Family Studies University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Lauren Smith

Chief Health Equity and Strategy Officer, CDC Foundation

Abel Covarrubias

Founder and CEO, Aprendamos Intervention Team

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data