Youth Development

Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, Inc.

  • Washington, DC
  • www.chci.org

Mission Statement

CHCI is a nonpartisan leadership development organization dedicated to cultivating the next generation of Latin American leaders. As a pipeline of young Latino talent to corporations, government agencies, nonprofits and other organizations, we ensure the interests of the Latino community are represented across all sectors of society.

Main Programs

  1. Congressional Internship Program
  2. Graduate Fellowships
  3. Public Policy Fellowship
  4. Ready 2 Lead (R2L)
  5. Scholarships
  6. Ready 2 Lead (R2L) NextGen
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Headquartered in our nation's capital, CHCI's service population is national in reach and has served Latino youth in 47 states and Puerto Rico. CHCI also has eight Alumni Chapters in key demographic cities, including Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Phoenix, and Washington, D.C.

ruling year

1978

President & CEO since 2016

Self-reported

Ms. Domenika Lynch

Keywords

Self-reported

CHCI, Higher Education, Parental Involvement, Workforce Diversity, Networking, Coalition Building, Leadership Development, Internships, Fellowships, Scholarships

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Also Known As

CHCI

EIN

52-1114225

 Number

0899584426

Physical Address

1128 16th Street, NW

Washington, DC 20036

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Congressional Internship Program

The CHCI Congressional Internship Program provides Latino college students with work placement on Capitol Hill four days a week, where they gain substantive work and networking experience. Interns also participate in once-a-week educational programs and leadership training at CHCI headquarters, where they meet with national public- and private-sector leaders and engage in national policy discussions. This comprehensive approach to leadership preparation provides unmatched professional and learning opportunities. Promising Latino undergraduates from across the country are selected for participation in this prestigious program.

CHCI also offers corporate sponsors the opportunity to offer company-based internships following students’ successful completion of CHCI’s Congressional Internship Program.

Category

Youth Citizenship

Population(s) Served

Hispanics

None

None

Budget

Program 2

Graduate Fellowships

CHCI’s Graduate Fellowship Program helps increase the number of Latino leaders in policy areas in which they are traditionally underrepresented. It provides exceptional Latino college graduates and young Latino professionals from across the country unparalleled opportunity for professional experience in the public policy arenas of education, health, housing, international affairs, law, and the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). It also offers a chance to participate in CHCI's nationally acclaimed leadership development training program, including research and publication of a public policy paper about a public policy issue in their chosen field. These policy papers are presented an audience of key public- and private-sector leaders on Capitol Hill each spring.

CHCI also offers corporate sponsors the opportunity to offer company-based fellowships following students’ successful completion of CHCI’s Graduate Fellowship Program.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

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None

Budget

Program 3

Public Policy Fellowship

CHCI’s Public Policy Fellowships offer a paid, nine-month fellowship and professional leadership training program for young Latinos who have completed a bachelor’s degree. Fellows work in congressional offices on Capitol Hill, corporate federal affairs offices, congressional committees and federal agencies, the White House, national nonprofit advocacy organizations, and government-related institutes. This intensive work experience is enhanced by weekly leadership training sessions at CHCI headquarters where they engage with national leaders around substantive public policy issues. Exposure to the wealth of information, contacts, and political activity in Washington D.C. gives fellows a unique opportunity to pursue their public policy career goals.

CHCI also offers corporate sponsors the opportunity to offer company-based internships or fellowships following students’ successful completion of CHCI’s Public Policy Fellowship Program.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Program 4

Ready 2 Lead (R2L)

CHCI’s high school college-readiness program provides educational and information resources to Latino high school students and their parents to empower and motivate families with the belief that college is attainable. The interactive one-day program includes financial literacy training and tools in both Spanish and English to help students and parents understand how to effectively prepare for and apply to college. R2L’s Mentoring “Power Hour” connects students to successful CHCI alumni and Hispanic professionals who serve as role models. In the summer of 2011, CHCI will expand the R2L program to provide selected students a week in the nation’s capitol, providing innovative learning tools to provide a broad perspective of the professional opportunities open to students with a college education.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

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Budget

Program 5

Scholarships

CHCI’s Scholarship Program supports Latino students in community college, four-year programs, and graduate school. Scholarships are awarded for two or four years, based on the student’s program of study, and provide critical financial assistance that help keep students in school and boost the Latino college graduation rate.

CHCI also offers corporate sponsors the opportunity to link company-based internships to its scholarship grants, broadening the students’ professional opportunities and connecting corporate partners to critical Latino talent.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Program 6

Ready 2 Lead (R2L) NextGen

The R2L NextGen program is a week-long Washington, D.C. experience, sponsored by State Farm and held in partnership with the Close Up Foundation. CHCI brings students in 9th, 10th, and 11th grade to Washington, D.C. to spend five days learning about how the Federal Government works, meeting important leaders, visiting historic sites and developing a deeper understanding of how they can affect positive change in their communities and their nation.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    At its 2010 retreat, the CHCI Board of Directors engaged in a rigorous process to refine the mission and vision of the organization, review the core program areas, and develop CHCI’s first-ever, five year strategic plan to run from 2011 to 2015. The strategic plan is entitled “Building Our Future, Together.” Its goal is to grow and strengthen CHCI to serve more and leverage its clout to open opportunities and advance the community. CHCI outlined four strategic objectives that are groundbreaking and provide a road map that will help CHCI continue to build a solid foundation for future growth measured against its 2009/2010 benchmarks.

    Objective 1: Increase and Diversify CHCI Revenue Streams
    Objective 2: Increase CHCI’s effectiveness in advancing its mission through Branded Leadership Programs, Alumni and Convening Power
    Objective 3: Enhance the Visibility and Brand of CHCI & Image of the Latino Community
    Objective 4: Make CHCI a “Best Practice” Model in Board Governance
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    The strategies include:

    Objective 1: Increase and Diversify CHCI Revenue Streams
    • Increase revenue to $10 million by 2015
    • Capital campaign goal of $15 million by 2017
    • Increase funding by private foundations
    • Establish regional funds – Youth Promise Fund
    • Increase number of individual donors through board, alumni, CFC/United Way, and mobile giving

    Objective 2: Increase CHCI’s effectiveness in advancing its mission through Branded Leadership Programs, Alumni and Convening Power
    • Work toward increasing the number of students served to 3,000 annually
    • Brand CHCI’s premiere leadership development model and curriculum
    • Develop short-term and long-term program metrics
    • Leverage CHCI’s convening power
    • Incorporate lifelong engagement of CHCI Alumni

    Objective 3: Enhance the Visibility and Brand of CHCI & Image of the Latino Community
    • Establish the brand value to position CHCI to own Latino leadership
    • Fully integrate social media and technology, including a redesign and overhaul of CHCI’s website and its marketing and communications platforms
    • Create integrated messaging and telling our story
    • Raise visibility of CHCI Alumni and provide positive images of Latinos

    Objective 4: Make CHCI a “Best Practice” Model in Board Governance
    • Develop new board structure and revise bylaws
    • Initiate new Advisory Council
    • Strengthen governance practices
    • Increase visibility of the Board and Advisory Council members
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Not available.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Not available.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Not available.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Headquartered in our nation's capital, CHCI's service population is national in reach and has served Latino youth in 47 states and Puerto Rico. CHCI also has eight Alumni Chapters in key demographic cities, including Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Phoenix, and Washington, D.C.

Social Media

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS INSTITUTE INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

President & CEO

Ms. Domenika Lynch

BIO

Domenika Lynch comes to CHCI from Los Angeles where she served for 10 years as the executive director of the Latino Alumni Association (LAA) at the University of Southern California (USC), which is widely regarded as the nation's strongest Latino alumni association.  

During her time at USC, Lynch led the LAA to new heights, raising more than $15 million to support student scholarships and leadership development programming. She managed a $1.4 million annual program budget and awarded more than $800,000 in annual scholarships to 200 LAA scholars. Prior to USC, she was previously vice president, market development manager for Bank of America, and account executive at Univision Communications Inc.

Over the last 20 years, Lynch has been deeply engaged in community initiatives that increase college access and competitive career opportunities for underprivileged and underrepresented students. As a first generation college student, she believes her life's work is to open doors and create opportunities where there are none for our most marginalized students. Her greatest strength she believes is turning adversity into her competitive advantage.  

Lynch is very active in her community. She is a board trustee for St. Anne's, an advocacy organization that supports teen-mothers and their babies. She has been a part of the USC Neighborhood Outreach Grants Committee, the Toyota TODOS Scholarship Committee, the TELACU Scholarship Committee and the Telemundo Padres Heroes Selection Committee, and served as Bank of America's Achievement Awards chair.

She was named a 2016 Latina of Influence by Hispanic Lifestyle, a Los Angeles Community Hero by Telemundo, received an Educational Leadership Award from Saber es Poder and was selected as Chevron's Breast Cancer L.A. Latino Initiative spokesperson.

She is a double USC alumna with degrees in Public Policy and a Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy. She also is a proud parent of a USC alumnus.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Joaquin Castro

CHCI/U.S. House of Representatives

Term: Jan 2017 - Dec 2018

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan