CHESAPEAKE BAY TRUST

Protect the Chesapeake

Annapolis, MD   |  www.cbtrust.org

Mission

The Chesapeake Bay Trust engages and empowers diverse groups to take actions that enrich natural resources and local communities of the Chesapeake Bay region. Vision The Chesapeake Bay and local watersheds are healthy and safe, our waters are fishable and swimmable, local communities benefit from these healthy resources, and everyone participates in restoring and protecting our natural resource treasures.

Ruling year info

1986

President

Dr. Jana Davis PhD

Main address

108 Severn Avenue

Annapolis, MD 21403 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1454182

NTEE code info

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As the population grows and development expands in the Chesapeake Bay region, more and more pollution and runoff are entering our waterways. Protecting our region’s water quality and natural resources has never been so important. ● Although the Chesapeake Bay continues its recovery, we still have a long way to go before the Bay is fully restored. ● We need diverse partnerships of people and organizations and a boots-on-the-ground approach to engage communities to work together to make a significant impact for our Bay.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

The Chesapeake Bay Trust advances environmental education through experiential learning, outdoor experiences, and curriculum development to educate students about their natural resources.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Restoring the Chesapeake Bay and its local rivers and streams in ways that engage communities and individual residents remains one of the Trust's greatest funding priorities. Top priorities include reducing pollution, restoring habitat, and improving water quality.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Chesapeake Bay Trust aims to engage individuals and organizations to improve the health of communities and local waterways.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Chesapeake Bay Trust works to advance science in many arenas in which we fund, such as best practices in environmental education, social science to change behaviors, and efficacy of restoration practices.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

4 Star Charity 2020

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children provided an environmental, hands-on education experience

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of native trees, plants, and marsh grasses planted in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Support to the Chesapeake Bay Trust allows us to invest in projects that restore and preserve the bays watersheds.

Number of acres of streamside buffers and precious wetlands restored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of shoreline created (linear feet)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Trust has reviewed the community context, considered our place in the watershed community, identified new gaps it can fill, and identified gaps it will continue to fill. Over the next five years, the Trust will remain committed to supporting efforts in its three main realms: K-12 environmental education, on-the-ground restoration that engages the community, and community engagement and resource stewardship through grants and programs like the Chesapeake Conservation Corps. The Trust will continue its commitment to diversity and inclusion, using programs to engage communities that have not traditionally identified themselves with the watershed restoration movement. The Trust will continue to develop expertise and provide technical resources to the Bay community about best practices related to both community engagement and restoration, working in collaboration with partners. The Trust will continue to serve as a partner in identifying joint interests with other funders, pooling and administering resources to provide streamlined grant-making for applicants, thereby increasing the amount awarded through grants.

These efforts will be placed in the context of several new actions or newly emphasized themes:

• Sustainability: The Trust aims to structure its grant programs to maximize the impact of its grants, and, where appropriate, make more investments with longer-term impact such that environmental benefits are sustained beyond the end of a grant or project term. The Trust will be emphasizing to a greater degree through its calls for proposals and evaluation process three levels of sustainability: The sustainability of the individual project, the sustainability of the organization doing the work, and the sustainability of the “stewardship ethic" created by the project in the community. The Trust also aims to become more sustainable itself by structuring revenue streams that complement each other and maximize longevity.

• Engagement of additional audiences: For two reasons, the Trust aims to reach beyond groups already committed to environmental work to new groups, or groups with a large gap between how they could be engaged and how they are currently engaged with natural resource issues. First, given the breadth of the natural resource restoration challenges, the Trust will only garner the resources and individual participation necessary for solutions if it represents and engages all communities in the watershed and develops stewards of our natural resources from wider audiences. Second, given that healthy natural resources improve lives in various ways, populations who are not engaged will be at a disadvantage. Humans have capacity to improve natural resources, and natural resources have the capacity to improve human life.

• Breaking through Barriers: The Trust commits to being deliberate about choosing to tackle key barriers in the watershed restoration community that prevent watershed restoration activities or citizen engagement.

See full Strategic Plan here: .https://cbtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2020-2025-Chesapeake-Bay-Trust-Strategic-Plan.pdf

Please see full Strategic Plan here:https://cbtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2020-2025-Chesapeake-Bay-Trust-Strategic-Plan.pdf

Please see full Strategic Plan here: https://cbtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2020-2025-Chesapeake-Bay-Trust-Strategic-Plan.pdf

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    One of the major audiences we serve is our grantees: Groups who desire to improve natural resources, engagement with natural resources, or communities through natural resource connections.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We learned that groups new to applying for grants felt intimidated by the application process, and we learned that groups without a predominantly environmental mission felt their needs and interests did not align with ours. In response to both of these pieces of feedback, we reconfigured an existing small grants program to be only eligible to new or relatively new applicants (0-3 prior approved proposals) and modified the language to emphasize benefits to communities, in addition to natural resources. We have also instituted a "connector group" model to reach new audiences to apply for our programs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We hope that the changes we have made to our small grants program has made them feel empowered to apply to our grant programs.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

CHESAPEAKE BAY TRUST
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHESAPEAKE BAY TRUST

Board of directors
as of 10/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Gary Jobson

Jobson Sailing

Term: 2016 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mr. John Valliant

Grayce B Kerr Fund

Term: 2017 - 2024

Erica Anthony

Morgan State University

Pamela Beidle

Maryland State Senate

Coretta Bennett

Bithenergy, Inc.

Joseph Farren

PowellTate

Brian Hart

Gartner

Gary Jobson

Jobson Sailing

Joseph Koch

Washington Area New Car Dealers Association

Anthony Leigh

Department of Veteran Affairs

Thomas Miller

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Studies

Christopher Corchiarino

Queen Anne's County Commissioners

Bryan Offutt

E3 Meat Company

Thomasina Piorot

Venable LLP

David Fraser-Hidalgo

Maryland State House of Delegates

Jason Keppler

Department of Agriculture

John Valliant

Grayce B. Kerr Fund

Alex Nunez

BGE

Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio

Secretary, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Matthew Rowe

Maryland Department of the Environment

Henry Hopkins

T. Rowe Price, retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/15/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.