Thrive DC

At the heart of a new start

Washington, DC   |  http://www.thrivedc.org

Mission

Thrive DC works to end and prevent homelessness by providing vulnerable individuals with a broad range of services to help stabilize their lives.

Ruling year info

1987

Executive Director

Ms. Alicia Horton

Main address

1525 Newton Street NW Suite G-1

Washington, DC 20010 USA

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Formerly known as

Dinner Program for Homeless Women

EIN

52-1485474

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Congregate Meals (K34)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

On any given night, more than 6,000 people are homeless in Washington, DC, and while efforts have been increased to provide housing for people who are homeless, simply providing housing isn't enough. Without additional supports, vulnerable individuals will be unable to stabilize their lives and remain in their housing. Furthermore, as home prices and rents continue to rise in Washington, DC, many individuals who are struggling to make ends meet are often making the difficult choice between paying rent and buying food or prescriptions. Thrive DC provides a one-stop shop with both emergency and step-up services to stabilize individuals in crisis and provide a new start with dignity, compassion, and love. At the same time, we leading "upstream" efforts to fix the systemic issues leading to our clients' situations.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Employment Assistance and Job Training

Weekly workshops, our computer lab, and our full-time job developer assist clients in searching, applying, and interviewing for jobs.

Our culinary arts training program, called Real Opportunity, gives participants the kitchen skills as well as confidence and life skills to gain meaningful jobs in the food service industry.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Homeless people

We help formerly incarcerated men and women make a smooth transition back into the community through case management, job training, and job placement assistance.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

Thrive DC provides basic/emergency services such as meals prepared and served on-site Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, along with sandwiches and salads "to go" Monday through Friday. Additionally, showers and laundry facilities are available. These services help stabilize the lives of those who are most vulnerable and in need.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Through a variety of activities, Thrive DC promotes the mental well-being of vulnerable people. Peer-supported group counseling sessions for those struggling with addiction are held three times each week and are in both English and Spanish. An expressive arts group meets weekly to provide an outlet for self-expression.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Substance abusers

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Catalogue of Philanthropy One of the Best Small Nonprofits 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Daily Bread/Daily Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thrive DC serves breakfast and dinner on-site and lunch "to go." We also provide sandwiches to other organizations for weekend distribution or for people who are not served directly by Thrive DC.

Pounds of emergency groceries and fresh produce distributed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Daily Bread/Daily Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thrive DC provides emergency groceries for those who have housing but are unable to afford food. We also hold a weekly free farmers market with fresh produce.

Number of referrals made to shelters, for medical or mental health assistance, etc.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thrive DC connects people who are homeless with needed services, including shelter/housing, medical assistance, mental health treatment, substance abuse counseling.

Number of job placements made

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Employment Assistance and Job Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thrive DC assists people who are homeless with job searches and applications. We provide workshops to prepare our clients for the workforce. We also conduct a 23-week culinary arts training program.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

I. Through Thrive DC's Daily Bread/Daily Needs program, provide the District of Columbia's homeless and low-income women, men, and children with hot, nutritious and appetizing meals and critical emergency services in a safe, low-barrier setting.

II. To provide homeless and vulnerable individuals with the ongoing social services and case management which can assist them in transitioning out of their current state of homelessness.

III. To provide employment training and assistance that will help homeless individuals reach their full potential and become employment-ready.

IV. To ensure individuals coming out of incarceration have the tools necessary to re-enter the community and live independent, self-sufficient lives.

Provide an evening meal to at least 40 women and children per night (Monday-Friday); a morning meal to least 160 men, women and children per day (Monday-Friday), and a Lunch To Go each weekday serving at least 150,000 meals per year.

To provide at least 1200 emergency supply items and emergency services to people in need each week, including toiletries, clothing, telephone/mail access, transportation access, and free showers and laundry.

To have at least 100 participants per week in a variety of educational, enrichment, and therapeutic activities.

To provide at least 30 different individuals each week with individualized case management and referrals to different community resources and agencies, serving at least 500 unique individuals/year.

To provide at least 35 individuals per week with access to a comprehensive range of wraparound social, health, and legal services through on-site collaboration with at least 1 partner provider each week.

To provide intensive employment coaching to up to 100 people and 24 Real Opportunity trainees each year, including offering 40 employment workshops, providing 100 instances of transportation assistance, and supplying 90 referrals to job-related community partners.

To provide 50 hours of computer access or training each week through our Computer/Office Skills Workshop, tutoring individuals in basic resume writing, interview, and job search skills.

Thrive DC has a staff of 13 full-time and 3 part-time employees. The organization is led by our Executive Director who oversees finances and day-to-day operations of the organization. Thrive DC's Development Staff consists of the Development Director who manages overall fundraising and communications and supervises our full-time Development Manager, Volunteer and In-kind Donation Coordinator, Communications Coordinator, and part-time Development Assistant. The Executive Director oversees all client programming and Thrive DC's social services staff, which consists of two Program Coordinators, Program Assistant, Reentry Program Manager, Safety Officer and Substance Abuse Counselor. The Executive Chef oversees all culinary operations. Two interns support the Development team and 2-3 interns support the Social Services team at any given time. Each year approximately 1,500 volunteers provide service in a variety of ways, including preparing and serving meals, cleaning up, assisting in the Computer Lab and providing administrative help.

Thrive DC rents a large space that includes a commercial scale kitchen, expansive program floor that can seat 200 and offices for our staff. We have space for a Computer Lab which holds six computer stations. Additionally, we own a van that is used to pick up food, clothing and other in-kind donations.

In 2021, we entered into a partnership with another organization to provide transitional housing to women exiting incarceration.

In 2020, as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we stepped up our emergency grocery program to help stabilize families in crisis, teaming up with food banks and mutual aid societies to provide over 40,000 boxes of groceries around DC.

After starting the Women In New Directions Program to help women coming out of incarceration transition back into society in 2014, we established an employment training component in 2017 and expanded the program to include men in 2018.

In October, 2015 received a grant from the United Planning Organization that enabled us to increase our Real Opportunity Employment Training program. That grant was recently renewed for the third time.

We have expanded our substance abuse counseling services to now include a full-time counselor who conducts both group and individual counseling sessions in English and Spanish.

We have initiated a focus on diversifying our funding, with heavy emphasis on contributions from individuals. In 2017 we received contributions from more than 1,000 individuals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Thrive DC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Thrive DC

Board of directors
as of 9/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Mitchell Brooks

DSI

Term: 2018 - 2019

Cathy Harris

Kator, Parks, Weiser & Harris PLLC

Alicia Horton

Synina Pugh

DC Dept. of Human Services

Steve Groeninger

Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation

Keisha Streeter-Clark

DC Urban Living

Jennifer Helm

Facebook

Radha Rangarajan

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Linda Platt

Compassion & Choices

Christina Zampardi

Mitchell Brooks IV

DSI

Gracy Obuchowicz

Beautiful Life Self Care LLC

Arlisa Williams

DC International School

David Arthur

PPL Corporation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data