ADVOCATES FOR HOMELESS FAMILIES INC

aka AFHF   |   Frederick, MD   |  http://www.afhf88.org

Mission

Advocates for Homeless Families' mission is to achieve permanent solutions to homelessness by providing access to housing, education, employment, and supportive services to Frederick County families who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness.

Notes from the nonprofit

Ninety-three percent of all funding goes directly into programs and client services. We have a success rate of 95% of our clients that remain housed up to five years following our program services.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Mr. Kenneth Allread

Main address

216 Abrecht Place

Frederick, MD 21701 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Advocates for the Homeless

EIN

52-1591139

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Family Services (P40)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (O01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Advocates for Homeless Families' mission is to achieve permanent solutions to homelessness by providing access to housing, education, employment, and supportive services to Frederick County families who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Transitional Housing Program

The Transitional Housing Program is a one-year structured and holistic program provided to families who are homeless.  The program, which includes individualized case management and Life Skills Workshops, is designed to support families in their transition to stable and independent living.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents

The Families Forward Program is designed to be preventative for families who are at-risk of becoming homeless.  A two-year structured and comprehensive program providing individualized case management and Life Skills Workshops to support families in maintaining their self-sustainability and improve their standard of living.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Target population: Advocates for Homeless Families serves homeless Frederick County residents aged 18 or over who have custody of one or more minor children and who are clean and sober from illegal drugs/alcohol for the past six months. Participants must be committed to Advocates' programs and be willing and able to pursue an education and/or job training and provide proof of income and diligence in pursuing employment.

Our goals are:

1. To assist 15-20 homeless families annually to increase their earning potential and decrease their reliance on the community and State safety net.

2. To prevent homelessness for 15 at-risk families annually through access to support services and emergency financial assistance.

3. To prevent chronic homelessness by rapidly rehousing and providing support services for up to 35 homeless families annually;

4. To strengthen the Continuum of Care for Frederick County by providing services that complement what other agencies provide and that form the path from homelessness to permanent housing.

Evidence-based Milestones

Advocates for Homeless Families uses an evidence-based case management model to deliver intensive support to homeless families with complex and challenging obstacles to housing. Case managers assist families to achieve milestones and targets through direct support and referrals. Advocates' case managers help participants set and measure progress toward short-term milestones and long-term targets for self-sustainability. Participants work to achieve their targets in the areas of future housing, family stability, education, economic growth, and employment.

Transitional Housing for Special Populations

Following passage of the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) Act, the National Alliance to End Homelessness (NAEH) published "Recommendations for Effective Implementation of the HEARTH Act Continuum of Care Regulations," March 27, 2013. In this study, NAEH explains how scattered-site models of transitional housing, like ours, are ideal for implementing a "transition in place" model of rapid re-housing. Advocates offers homeless families an immediate placement in a single family apartment which provides the benefits of an apartment (stability, privacy, subsidized rents) and the supports of a shelter (case management, access to services). The study notes that transitional housing is particularly important for "serving households with multiple housing barriers or with unique needs."

Case Management for Homelessness Prevention

A common finding among a number of research organizations (SAMHSA, HUD, The Urban Institute and others) is that the best way to end homelessness is to prevent it. Through our Families Forward program, we provide homelessness prevention services in the form of case management, access to housing and utilities assistance programs and other services.

Prosperity Strategies, as also embraced by United Way Worldwide.

1. Family-sustaining employment: our families work while they are in the program, and they gain education and skills that improve their ability to secure employment and income potential.
2. Affordable housing: families are connected to permanent housing providers and housing supports
3. Savings and assets: families gain financial literacy through our life skills program and begin a savings plan while they are in the program
4. Manageable expenses: families learn the skills they need to lower their household expenses while they gain financial literacy.
5. Income supports: Advocates connects families to the benefits for which they are eligible, including a sliding scale rent program in Advocates' transitional housing.

Advocates for Homeless Families excels at providing a comprehensive and holistic set of services that address the root causes of a family's homelessness, and we provide a clear and achievable pathway to self-sustainability. Advocates works with families using evidence-based case management with specific monthly milestones for each of our participant families. We believe that participant accountability is necessary to effect the social re-engineering that leads our families to sustainability.

Every participant must meet a 35-hour weekly productivity standard to remain in our programs. The standard can be met through an accumulation of work hours, classroom hours, meetings with case managers, attendance at weekly Life Skills Workshop sessions, volunteerism, and attendance at counseling, AA or NA meetings.

Staff expertise: Advocates' two case managers are both professional and clinical counselors with a combined 30 years of experience working with the homeless, the disadvantaged, and marginalized. They participate in continuing certification activities to maintain their professional certification.

Housing units: We provide 12 scattered-site apartments and housing units for families in our Transitional Housing program. These housing units are professionally managed and provided on a sliding scale fee basis to help homeless families reduce their household expenses and learn household management skills in an independent yet supported environment.

A comprehensive Life Skills curriculum: Advocates developed this curriculum to address all major areas of life competency. Case managers coordinate and frequently teach 52 units of instruction in Health and Wellness, Finance/Budget, Parenting/Interpersonal Relationships and Independent Living Skills. While some classes are taught by the case managers, many are taught by subject matter experts drawn from the Frederick community.

Our partnerships with other community entities: We connect our families to community resources that they can use to their advantage in preparing for a future of self-sustainability. These include strong partnerships with Frederick Community College, Second Chances Garage, Workforce Development, and Mental Health Association, all of which provide services - education, transportation, employment, and wellness - of significant bearing on a family's ultimate success.

Our programs work!

Advocates' Board and staff witness annually that the cycle of poverty can be broken among the homeless families that participate in our programs. We achieve this by helping our program participants create plans for their futures and holding them accountable for acting on those plans.

As participants work to create their futures, we support them by providing transitional housing, intensive, caring case management support, and access to supportive services such as child care and transportation. With our support system, homeless families can improve their standards of living and achieve housing stability long term.

Advocates' Board and staff are committed to breaking the cycle of poverty among our program participants. By helping young women increase their self-confidence, acquire a better education, obtain a job, and learn to live independently, we are responsible for families living stably at a rate of 95% up to five years following their exit from our programs. This statistic is derived from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Service Point/Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) database and it represents Advocates' housing stability rate as better than the 80% national recidivism rate.

Each year, we provide housing and support services to about 20 families (approximately 23 adults and 47 children) in the Transitional Housing program, about 15 families in our Families Forward (approximately 15 adults and 22 children for homelessness prevention) program, and approximately 35 families through our Rapid Rehousing efforts.

Collectively, our participants achieve the following milestones:

Enroll in or complete an educational or career training program
Maintain full- or part-time active employment
Complete 10 hours of financial literacy training
Save their earnings to create emergency funds and nest eggs
School-aged children attend school regularly (any attendance problem is reported by Frederick County Public Schools) and their academic excellence is celebrated
Graduate from the Transitional Housing program and moved into permanent housing.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

ADVOCATES FOR HOMELESS FAMILIES INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ADVOCATES FOR HOMELESS FAMILIES INC

Board of directors
as of 1/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Darlene Aulls

American Cancer Society

Term: 2017 - 2020

Darlene Aulls

American Cancer Society

Janet Samet-O'Leary

Hood College

Dan Lajewski

All Saints' Episcopal Church

Kendall Camuti

Attorney

Kim Braden

R.N. Frederick Health

Brian Ward

Business

Daniel Wagner

U.S. Gov.

Frank Dimicelli, III

AstraZeneca

Ryan Lewis

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/29/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data