GOLD2022

WASHINGTON ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION

Sharing the power of architecture to transform communities

Washington, DC   |  https://www.aiadc.com/waf

Mission

The Washington Architectural Foundation is dedicated to educating and engaging the greater DC community, focusing on students, teachers, professionals, and the public to demonstrate the transformative power of architecture.

Ruling year info

1989

Executive Director

Ms. Mary Fitch

Main address

421 Seventh Street, NW

Washington, DC 20004 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1592783

NTEE code info

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Secondary/High School (B25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The problem we face is really one of equity: Who makes decisions about the design of a community? Who has permission to address those issues? Our programs help the public of all ages learn about design and help influence the design of their community. For children, we focus on teaching design literacy with programming that extends from elementary school to university students. We have a particular interest in middle-school-age girls who are often left out of programs, and consequently, careers in design and construction. For adults, monthly design programming compliments our free exhibitions which look at design issues facing our city and other communities around the world. Architecture Month each April offer something for everyone – children and adults and design professionals– with workshops, tours, lectures and opportunities to go behind the scenes to better understand the process of design.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Young Architects Series: Tools of the Trade

Tools of the Trade teaches young people skills in drawing, model-making, site design, sustainability, theatre set design, and more. these monthly programs include architectectural walking tours of Washington, DC, neighborhoods. Each participant receives a certificate of completion.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

CANstruction is an annual competition in which 20+ teams of architects build creatively out of canned goods which are then donated to the Capital Area Food Bank. Much more than a good time for hundreds of volunteers, the competition focuses on hunger in our region and showcases the design and construction industries giving to the communities they help build. The CANstruction projects are a featured exhibit at the National Building Museum.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Summer Camp program gives children, ages 10-14, a week-long experience to learn design and problem solving skills. Taught by teams of talented architects, in 2019 the program will last full days and focus on the work of Frank Lloyd Wright

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Scholarships for DC residents who wish to attend architecture school. Starts with freshman year and continues at $5,000 each year the student remains in architecture school up to five years. WAF supports five students at any one-time.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

This three-session program for kids ages 10 to 12, teaches students the design processes used by architects to build scale models of habitable spaces of their own imagining. At each session, participants will work in teams to learn techniques that transform their ideas into a final design. Presentation skills will be fostered throughout the series to prepare participants to share their new skills and experiences with others.

This year, Archi-Builder explores how we build and how culture influences the design of places around the world. Using the exhibition, Transforming Cities, Transforming Lives: The Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme, students will discover how culture can have a positive impact on design

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

If you can see it, you can be it. The Architecture for Everyone: Girls Mentor Program was created in 2015 to open the architecture and design industry to young people coming from communities that are traditionally underrepresented in those disciplines. Young girls between the ages of 11-14 are paired with mentors from the architecture, construction, and engineering fields to learn first-hand about careers from professional women.

The goal of the Architecture for Everyone: Girls Mentor Program is to promote diversity and inclusion within the industry. WAF hopes to open a door that might eventually lead to greater equity and representation in a profession.

Population(s) Served
Preteens
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Through Architecture Month, DACKids Summer Camp, CANstruction, and more, we serve kids, adults, architects, and the public.

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Students

Related Program

Barbara G. Laurie Scholarship program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Barbara G. Laurie Scholarship Program supports architecture students throughout their college careers.

Pounds of food donated to the Capital Area Food Bank through CANstruction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

CANstruction

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

CANstructionDC has donated over 420 tons of food to the Capital Area Food Bank over 20+ years of operation.

Number of unique website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our website communicates our mission, goals, programs, and upcoming activities.

Average donation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Donations translate to more scholarships awarded, more children taught, and more programs presented.

Percentage of board members who donate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Board members see the value in the work of educating kids and adults about architecture and opening architecture opportunities to everyone.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Statistics as of 12/1 of that year. Donors are retained if they gave in the 12-24 months prior to 12/1 and then again in the 12 months leading up to 12/1. In other words, for 2 consecutive years.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Because we had to be virtual in 2020, our audience widened. And because most things were reoorded people could watch/sttend when convenient

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our aim is that everyone has access to all the opportunities design offers. Our goals include:
• Making sure our in-school programs are in all wards of the city, every semester
• Providing weekend and summer programs for children at our downtown District Architecture Center that people children and families of all income levels and backgrounds can access.
• Providing scholarships for DC residents who wish to attend architecture school but do not have access to funds to do so.
• Providing programming for adults that empowers them to engage with the design of their communities
• Providing a rich volunteer experience that is structured enough to comply with all necessary regulations but trains and supports the creative talents of our volunteers
• Shining a light on food insecurity in our region through a design-build competition where teams from the design community build structures out of canned goods which are later donated to the Capital Area Food Bank

Our Architecture in the Schools program has operated for almost three decades in the DC and Northern Virginia Schools. This eight-week program sends volunteer teams into the classroom to use architectural projects to supplement existing curricula from K-12. Our strategy has been to develop a strong relationship with administrators, principals and interested in teachers throughout DC and Northern Virginia.
We hold single and multi-weekend programming at the District Architecture Center, teaching skills to middle-schoolers such as drawing, model-making, photography and site design. Students are involved in design and hands-on building projects.

The Design Like A Girl Mentor Programs introduces girls to female role models in architecture, engineering and construction. Quarterly day-long programs teach basic design and engineering concepts which play out in construction of models of theater sets, space habitat or monuments and memorials.

The Barbara Laurie Scholarship Program helps DC students pursue an architecture degree who would otherwise be unable to afford college. The scholarship follows them throughout their college career and the Foundation supports them with any additional tutoring or training they might need and also helps to find the summer internships within Washington firms.

Our programs for adults include monthly programming which supplements the exhibitions in our two galleries. Our capstone program is Architecture Month with more than 40 activities. Each year we have a theme. In 2018 we looked at 50 years after the 1968 Uprising including lectures, exhibitions and films. Architecture Month 2019 was focused on connecting cultures, celebrating the many design and architectural traditions of our embassy partners.

To enrich our volunteer experience we have recently developed job descriptions for our two levels of volunteers, lead and associate, so that its clear who does what and what training may be necessary. We are investing in orientation and training so that our volunteers can easily comply with all applicable laws and have an enriched experience with our students, both children and adults.

The Foundation was created by the Washington Chapter of the American Institute of Architects in 1987 to celebrate its centennial. From the start we have had hundreds of volunteer architects involved in our programming each year. The Chapter’s staff provides support for programming through program administration, grants and fundraising. WAF’s Board of Directors is diverse, professional and committed to driving the success of the foundation’s programs.

WAF’s program supporters include the leading funders of arts and humanities in metro DC, including Humanities DC, the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Nora Roberts Foundation, the DC Preservation League, the Clark-Winchcole Foundation and numerous other small foundations, as well as a large number of individual donors, large and small who together make it possible for WAF to produce the programs that have a significant impact on our community.

Since moving to the District Architecture Center in the center of the city in 2011 we have been able to expand our programming for both in-school and out-of-school audiences. We are now providing programming for schools around our region at DAC as well. We believe this may be a direction for ultimately sustaining Architecture in the Schools as school buildings themselves become ever more secure.

We are successfully addressing ‘the middle school cliff’ when girls decide that careers in STEM are not for them. Our Design Like a Girl Program, specifically, and all our out-of-school programs generally include girls of this age.

WAF’s half-day summer camp has been so popular that we are now offering it for full days. In addition, kids that have aged out of summer camp have new opportunities as volunteers for the camp and for new programs that show 13-17-year-olds the kinds of careers design offers. In addition, we are piloting a digital design class this year for the same age group. In this way we are reaching students at all levels from K-12.

The work to expand outreach to the public to raise awareness of the importance of architecture in our daily lives prompted us to expand Architecture Week to Architecture Month. Currently 1200 people attend Architecture Month activities. We’d like to double that. We believe the best way to do that is through partnerships with other organizations.

We want to expand the opportunities open to many of our volunteers. Many of our most successful programs were designed by our volunteers. We want to find ways to expand these activities while protecting our most active volunteers from burn-out.

And finally, creating a stable, reliable funding source for our activities is still an ongoing priority. We are focusing our fundraising efforts toward individual donors who can help us support our existing programming.

Financials

WASHINGTON ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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WASHINGTON ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 12/19/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Gina Volpicelli

Shalom Baranes Associates Architects

Term: 2022 - 2023

Jeff Kerr, PE

Simpson Gumphertz Hege

David Daileda, FAIA

Retired

Mark Lawrence, AIA

E/L Studio Architects

Janet Bloomberg, AIA

KUBE Architecture

John di Domenico

di Domenico + Partners

Brian Hanlon

Brailsford + Dunlavey

Henok Tesfaye

U Street Parking

Stephen Wright, AIA

Ayers Saint Gross

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/12/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data