GOLD2022

Safe Kids Worldwide

aka Safe Kids Worldwide   |   Silver Spring, MD   |  http://www.safekids.org

Mission

Safe Kids Worldwide (Safe Kids) is a nonprofit dedicated to protecting kids from preventable injuries, the number one cause of death for children in the United States. Safe Kids is a go-to resource to help parents and caregivers keep kids safe from car crashes, fires, falls, poisoning, and more. Through more than 400 coalitions in the United States and partners in more than 30 countries, Safe Kids works with children's hospitals, trauma centers, first responders, and public health experts to get evidence-informed, life-saving information to families, no matter where they live, to influence behavior change. Since 1988, the work of Safe Kids has contributed to the more than 60 percent reduction in childhood unintentional injury deaths in the United States.

Ruling year info

2015

President & CEO

Ms. Torine Creppy

Main address

1 Inventa Place Sixth Floor West

Silver Spring, MD 20910 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Safe Kids USA

National Safe Kids Campaign

EIN

52-1627574

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Safety Education (M40)

Public Health Program (E70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Safe Kids Buckle Up

Safe Kids Buckle Up helps protect children in and around cars. Road injuries are the greatest cause of preventable deaths to children in the United States and around the world. The Safe Kids Buckle Up program, which began in 1997 with a focus on child safety seat checks at GM dealerships, has grown into a broad multifaceted program that addresses child safety in and around cars. It also includes activities that advocate for stronger state child passenger safety laws.

Since its inception, the Buckle Up program has grown to include four main components:
• Child Passenger Safety: Addressing car seats, booster seats and seat belts.
• Heatstroke Awareness and Prevention: Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children under the age of 14.
• Frontovers and Backovers Prevention: Public education on driveway and parking lot injuries known as frontovers and backovers.
• Teen Driver Safety: Driver education and awareness for teens and parents of teens.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults
Family relationships

Safe Kids is the certifying body for the National Child Passenger Safety Certification Training Program. As such, Safe Kids certifies child passenger safety technicians and instructors and is responsible for providing nationwide access to registered certification courses, assures a user friendly course registration process, provides standards for recertification and instructor candidacy, and processes recertification and instructor candidacy documentation when requirements are successfully met. It maintains a directory of approximately 40,000 certified CPS technicians and instructors and provides customer service to current and aspiring CPS technicians and instructors. Many technicians are trained health and safety professionals, others are parents, and some are volunteers, but they all have one thing in common: They care deeply about kids and want to make sure they’re safe. The U.S. CPS certification program is widely considered to be the gold standard across the globe.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In 2000, Safe Kids Worldwide created Walk This Way to bring national and local attention to pedestrian safety issues. Safe Kids works in ten countries and more than 250 communities in the United States to teach safe behavior to motorists and child pedestrians to create safer, more walkable communities. The four main components of the program include: Awareness and Advocacy Activities, Infrastructure Improvements, Research, Education Programs. Since Walk This Way’s launch, the number of child pedestrian fatalities has decreased by 39% in the U.S. and has reached more than 18 million children globally.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Family relationships

For more than 22 years, Safe Kids has led awareness, education and advocacy programs to promote the use of bike helmets for children, which can reduce the risk of severe brain injuries by 88 percent. Our programs focus on educating families about rules of the road, the importance of always wearing a helmet and other protective gear and equipment maintenance. This is accomplished through, educational outreach and support, national awareness campaign during National Bike to School Day and provision of safety devices (bike helmets). Our programs are complemented by our public policy efforts. Safe Kids advocates for strong bike helmet laws throughout the nation and opposes efforts in some jurisdictions to repeal bike helmet laws.

Population(s) Served

Between 2009 and 2018, 760 children ages 0 to 19 died in rail-related injury incidents. In the 0-19 age group, 64 percent of fatalities and 48 percent of non-fatal injuries are the result of trespass around tracks and trains. Safe Kids has a multi-dimensional program to raise awareness and educate families about the dangers of railroad tracks and trains crossings. The program includes educational outreach and support as well as a national awareness campaign during Rail Safety Week in September. Our Rail Safety Service Learning and Start Safe Travel programs have reached hundreds of teens and thousands of elementary school students and parents. Through both programs we have seen an increase in rail safety knowledge.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Family relationships
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Adults
Family relationships
Adolescents
Children
Preteens

Safe Kids Worldwide convened the Children in Autonomous Vehicles Consortium which wrapped up in April 2021 with the launch of the Children in Automated Vehicles toolkit. The toolkit was the result of 18 months of work from the Consortium. It is the first advocacy resource that focuses solely on the unique needs of children in automated vehicles.

Although fully automated vehicles are still in the research, development and testing stage, we know that there are still key questions that need to be addressed between now and that future by multiple sectors to ensure that child safety is considered in and around automated vehicles. Therefore, Safe Kids Worldwide has established the Safe Kids in Automated Vehicles Alliance (SKAVA) to continue to move the issue forward. SKAVA works to ensure that child safety needs are actively reflected in new automated feature designs, through voluntary industry standards, regulations, laws, and educational messaging.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Family relationships

Safe Kids home safety programs integrate educational opportunities for families, trainings for educators & healthcare professionals, engagement of child safety advocates & collaboration with partners. We assess programs regularly to expand & strengthen impact in high-risk, low-resource communities. Current focus areas within home safety include safe infant sleep, poison prevention, water safety, fire safety & burn prevention.

In 2020, 102 coalition grants were awarded to support community outreach in safe infant sleep, medicine safety & cleaning product safety. Through combined efforts of grant participants, Safe Kids conducted 940 educational sessions, reached 126,000+ children & adults, distributed 110,000+ educational materials & engaged 640+ local partners to expand program reach & amplify safety messages.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Family relationships

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Safe Kids Worldwide is focused on reducing childhood death from preventable injuries. Since the founding of Safe Kids in 1988, the work of Safe Kids has contributed to the more than 60 percent reduction in childhood unintentional injury deaths in the United States.

The reduction in the childhood death rate from unintentional injury represents more than a quarter of a million lives saved and countless injuries prevented. However, almost 35 years into our mission, we recognize more and more that preventive efforts have not always reached the children at greatest risk of unintentional injury. The causes of child injury vary according to a child’s age, sex, race, environment, geographic region, and socioeconomic status as well a child’s developmental abilities, exposure to potential hazards, and parent perceptions of both their child’s abilities and the injury risk. Younger children, boys, American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and children who live in poverty are disproportionately impacted.

Safe Kids needs to move more quickly to meet the needs of high risk and underserved populations, improve on the backbone elements of the organization, and ensure we are as strong, inclusive, and impactful as we can be.

To reach these children and their caregivers, we need to partner with experts and organizations already working in these communities, identify best practices with respect to engagement and development of messaging and programs, and build capacity and skills both internally and within our coalition network.

As a data-driven organization, we also recognize the need for applied research to better inform the new direction. We need to explore data linkage and visualization methodologies to better allow identification of high-risk groups and underserved communities. We need to meet these families where they are, understand their knowledge, perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors as they relate to child injury and its prevention, including the social and physical contexts in which they live. Armed with additional knowledge, we can then work with relevant partners and champions from those communities to develop – or modify – our messaging and programmatic approaches and advocate for policy changes at the organizational, municipal, state, and federal levels to support prevention efforts.

Ongoing organizational strategies outline below will also continue:

Research:
- Produce factsheets utilizing secondary data to describe current burden of 1) unintentional child injury overall, 2) SKW priority risk areas: child passenger safety, pedestrian safety, bicycling safety, drowning, poisoning, fire/burns and safe sleep and 3) other unintentional injuries impacting families (e.g., firearm injuries, toy injuries, sports injuries, etc.).
- Undertake additional research to inform programmatic/advocacy work and communications (e.g., focus groups, parent/caregiver surveys) around both priority risk areas and emerging issues and publish either public facing research reports and/or peer-reviewed articles.
- Identify evidence-base for programmatic, advocacy and communications activities and support development and evaluation of evidence-informed strategies.

Programs:
- Continue to support broad-based programs that protect children including sports safety; pedestrian safety; child passenger safety; television tip over prevention; medication safety; and teen passenger/driving safety.

Awareness:
- Conduct annual awareness campaigns that utilize traditional media and social media to draw the public's attention to new findings related to sports safety; pedestrian safety; child passenger safety; television tip over prevention; home safety; medication safety; and teen passenger/driving safety.
- Promote awareness of additional safety topics that impact the well-being of children throughout the year via the www.safekids.org website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Advocacy:
- Continue advocacy efforts at the local, state, and national levels to support public policy that protects children from preventable injuries.

Safe Kids Worldwide has two core competencies that differentiate the organization and contribute to our effectiveness.

1. We are able to reach millions of people directly each year through our unique grassroots network in the United States and our global partners in thirty countries. With 400 local coalitions across the United States, many of which reside in children's hospitals, Safe Kids is one of the most efficient and effective networks in existence today to reach doctors, nurses, healthcare workers, public health specialists, child care experts, and other caregivers who provide direct services and education about child injury prevention to families, parents, and caregivers.

Globally, Safe Kids member organizations work each day in thirty countries to protect children from preventable injuries. Safe Kids Worldwide is recognized globally as one of the leading organizations to help realize a day when every child is safe whether traveling by car (secure in a car seat); traveling on a bike or motorbike (wearing a helmet); or crossing the street (at a clearly marked crosswalk). Member organizations learn from each other, sharing knowledge, resources and best practices to further advance effective programs in each country.

2. We are able to broadly share key messages about protecting children from preventable injuries with parents and caregivers through sophisticated multimedia awareness campaigns.
As a trusted source for independent safety information, Safe Kids' awareness campaigns garner significant media attention, primarily through earned traditional and social media. From July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015, our media efforts resulted in 5.3 billion impressions, including exposure in prominent outlets such as The Today Show, Fox, ABC World News Tonight, CNN and USA Today. We pair national awareness campaigns with a strong grassroots network of coalitions and partners who carry our message into their communities and our programs are evidenced-based and rigorously evaluated annually.

While much progress has been made to protect children from preventable injuries, Safe Kids Worldwide is focused on reducing rates of child death even further domestically and globally. Since the founding of Safe Kids in 1988, the work of Safe Kids has contributed to the more than 60 percent reduction in childhood unintentional injury deaths in the United States.

In the United States, we are actively seeking funding partnership to further our program efforts to address:
a. Teen Driving – 2,138 teens die each year as passengers and drivers in cars.
b. Home Safety – 2500 children die at home each year from preventable injuries.
c. Safe Sleep – 1000 infants die each year from unsafe sleeping environments.
d. Water Safety – 1000 children die each year from drowning.
e. Fire Safety – Hundreds of children die each year from fires, burns and smoke inhalation.
f. Sports Safety – Millions of children sustain serious sports injuries each year that are preventable.

Globally, we are actively seeking funding partnerships to further our program efforts to address:
a. Road Safety – estimated 250,000 children die each year from road injuries as passengers and pedestrians.
b. Water Safety – estimated 170,000 children die each year from drowning.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Safe Kids Worldwide serves children and caretakers around the United States.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Recently, we started a series of quarterly Town Hall meetings for our network members to be able to hear from the organization President and other staff - after receiving feedback that our coalitions feel removed from staff.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has ensured that we are better able to serve them based on hearing their needs, feedback, etc.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

Safe Kids Worldwide
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Safe Kids Worldwide

Board of directors
as of 07/19/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Kristin Recchiuti

Kurt Newman

Children's National Medical Center

Kristin Recchiuti

McNeil Consumer Healthcare

Inez Tenenbaum

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data