Jobs with Justice Education Fund HQ

aka Jobs With Justice   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.jwj.org

Mission

Jobs With Justice believes that all workers should have collective bargaining rights, employment security, and a decent standard of living within an economy that works for everyone. We achieve these values by bringing together labor, community, student and faith voices at the national and local levels to win improvements in people’s lives and shape public discourse on workers’ rights and the economy. We win real change for workers by leading and supporting campaigns that catalyze expanded opportunities for worker organizing and bargaining, grassroots action and mobilization. Within our campaigns we employ strategic communications strategies and solid research and policy innovations that deepen and broaden possibilities for worker organizing and bargaining.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Erica Smiley

Main address

1150 Connecticut Ave NW, Ste 200

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1865575

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Jobs With Justice Education Fund (JWJEF) is a national network organization with 37 coalitions in 23 states across the country. We believe that all working people should have collective bargaining rights, labor and employment protections, employment security, and a decent standard of living. In partnership with a diverse universe of partners and allies we are creating innovative solutions to the socio-economic challenges working families face today.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Always Essential Campaign

Along with partners, we are catalyzing this moment and the “essential worker” narrative to fundamentally shift how workers in various low-wage sectors may permanently achieve better pay and working conditions as well as strengthen their workplace power.

The Always Essential Campaign seeks to transform what’s possible for essential workers, with significant impact on Black and other workers of color who disproportionately make up essential workers in low-wage sectors. For the first time in a long time, because of the COVID-19 crisis, workers in low-wage essential industries are being recognized and have the support of most Americans. We believe this is an historic opportunity to address the chronic undervaluing and insecurity of low-wage work in America. We also know that this moment is an important opportunity to prove through Always Essential that expanding the collective bargaining framework is an important solution to building back a healthy society and economy. For instance, a recent study found that in nursing homes where workers had access to standard setting decisions through a union, there were 30% less COVID deaths than in nursing homes where workers were not included or organize.

Building on the effective, ongoing campaign at the federal level to win protections for essential workers as part of COVID-19 relief and recovery efforts, the Always Essential Campaign takes the framework of an Essential Workers Bill of Rights and applies it to state and local policy, corporate accountability, and sectoral governance under a common banner to continue to build power behind a concept anchored in the experiences of essential workers. Winning includes raising standards in key sectors, improving safety, and increasing worker power in the workplace and on related bodies that make decisions about their work environment. The campaign has already experienced significant wins that both changed the immediate conditions of essential workers while also positioning them in decision-making structures that could influence how our society prepares for future crises beyond the pandemic. We are finding and encouraging authentic connections with the work our coalitions are conducting to better fortify and support efforts already advocating for essential workers. For instance, in New York, our JWJ affiliate the Alliance for a Greater New York (ALIGN-NY) fought to include worker-led health/safety committees in the HERO Act and won, with the bill being signed into law by Governor Cuomo earlier this month. JWJEF is also supporting the work of a local partner in Texas, the Workers Defense Project, which has led a coalition to establish a worker-led health/safety board in Harris County (Houston).

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Ethnic and racial groups

JWJEF partnered with Morehouse College and the Black Worker Initiative at the Institute for Policy Studies to form the Advancing Black Strategists Initiative (ABSI) in attempts to support southern, Black-led campaigns to create economic democracy through expanded forms of collective bargaining, and then elevate experiences from those campaigns to develop more Black strategists and inform the national and international discourse on ways to build worker power. ABSI uses the South as our primary region of focus because we believe some of the greatest change in this country can occur by leading a counter-framework against the common narrative that working people in the South have little or no power in their workplace or communities. Looking ahead, we plan on launching our Movement Fellows program in early 2022, which will train Black movement leaders and place them in strategic roles in ongoing campaigns throughout the South, of which we are currently targeting through landscape analysis.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent

Building a grassroots network of sustainable and powerful coalitions, prioritizing leadership by women and BIPOC, capable of strategically organizing locally while supporting and engaging an ever-broadening universe of working people. Including:
• Women and BIPOC in Network Leadership - As an organization led by a Black, queer, nonbinary person, we are committed to projecting a racial and gender justice lens both internally and externally and our network has evolved as we intentionally elevate more women, TGNC, and BIPOC leaders into senior staff positions.
• Increase Network Regrant Capacity – Jobs With Justice aims to expand our annual pool of re-grant dollars that go towards strategic campaigns and membership efforts of our local coalitions, while exploring new fundraising and resourcing structures that will allow for significantly greater resources to be delivered to the field.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Work status and occupations

To catalyze Biden’s $2.3T infrastructure investment plan, we are launching a campaign to ensure that this bill doesn’t just build-up our physical infrastructure, but also improves our country in ways that right-size historic inequities. In order to truly “Build Back Better” and spur transformational growth, any future infrastructure investments in this country can’t return us to the old status quo of patriarchal white supremacist capacity building that has historically left behind workers in underserved communities. Immigrant, underemployed, women, undocumented and BIPOC workers have rarely if ever benefited from past infrastructure investments, and these communities remain the slowest ones to economically recover from the pandemic. Our infrastructure plans must be inclusive and increase opportunity for all workers so that we aren’t just building up our economy and increasing GDP, but that we are building it in inclusive ways strategies that will truly increase opportunity for all workers.

As our country begins to wrestle with a relatively gridlocked Congress, we know that administrative advocacy will become an important pathway for JWJEF to advance policy change. For instance, the POWER Act (which provides critical labor protections for im/migrants and contains vital safeguards against retaliation by employers) has yet to be reintroduced in Congress, there doesn’t seem to be an effort to do so, and the PRO Act faces a tough fight in the Senate. With that being said, some pieces of the PRO Act and the POWER Act could actually be moved through Biden’s infrastructure plans as well as other administrative actions and that’s exactly what we hope to achieve. Our infrastructure plans should not just benefit employers - if we face an uphill battle for effective legislative change, we need to remain nimble and educate every branch of our government to ensure that BIPOC, women, working families, and undocumented folks are able to benefit from upcoming infrastructure plans. Our work will include educating the administration about the POWER Act and its potential relationship to the Jobs Plan Act, getting the Biden administration to adopt and operationalize allowing undocumented workers to apply for relief when asserting their rights in the workplace that protects them from retaliation by ICE, and ensuring that BIPOC U.S. born workers, women, and BIPOC migrant workers equitably benefit from the creation of millions of good quality jobs from the Jobs Act.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Work status and occupations
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

JWJ’s most recent federal priority that has captured the greatest public attention has been the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act. The PRO Act is a bill which aims to strengthen the federal laws that protect workers’ right to organize into unions and collectively bargain for fair wages, benefits, and other worker protections. JWJ is forging a multi-pronged policy, organizing, and communications strategy to campaign to educate the public on this legislation. As the PRO Act gains momentum, JWJ will be working with different Members of Congress to ensure the legislation doesn’t simply further the status quo of traditional labor models but visions and retains protections for app/gig workers, including language around union protections for workers at franchisees. We have launched an economic democracy campaign that highlights various relevant worker fights that showcase the importance of this bill, including local JWJ campaigns and the current union drive in Bessemer, AL. We will continue to uplift and protect the specific parts of the legislation that aim to create an economic democracy that prioritizes building long-term worker power, especially for low-wage workers of color who have been historically and intentionally excluded from worker protections.

Population(s) Served
Work status and occupations
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Work status and occupations
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Work status and occupations
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Work status and occupations
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Work status and occupations
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Jobs With Justice Education Fund (JWJEF), we are committed to supporting low-wage worker organizing campaigns across sectors. We work to ensure that workers have the space to build their power and connect their struggles while advocating on behalf of themselves and their communities for real impactful economic changes. Whether through organizing, policy advocacy, public education, movement building, or mobilizing the masses, we believe in the power of working in solidarity relying on innovative strategies and ideas to bring about immediate and long-term transformation that will benefit workers and communities across the country. Over the years we have witnessed some social, political, and economic trends that have advanced inequality nationally and globally. We recognize the value in addressing not just one root cause of poverty, but all aspects of it from different angles. Given the interconnectedness of issues, we also acknowledge the limitations of one organization and recognize the value in partnering with other likeminded institutions/organizations and individuals to advance our shared economic justice agendas.

Jobs with Justice Education Fund (JWJEF) believes that all workers should have collective bargaining rights, employment security, and a decent standard of living within an economy that works for everyone. We do this by bringing together labor, community, student, and faith voices at the national and local levels to win improvements in people's lives and shape public discourse on workers' rights and the economy. Our core strategies for advancing our mission are three-fold: 1) incubate and lead campaigns that combine innovative communications strategies, solid research and policy advocacy, and grassroots base-building and mobilization; 2) shape public discourse on workers' rights and an economy that works for everyone that fuels, informs, and supports our future of work initiative; 3) build and support a network of coalitions that provide a permanent infrastructure for working people to build power, wage strategic campaigns, mobilize, organize and negotiate. To ensure success at all levels of our work and collaborations we recognize it is necessary to – 1) build and sustain long-term relationships; 2) model and expect reciprocity and solidarity; 3) prioritize campaigns that engage impacted workers actively leading, and building power; and 4) assure that our campaigns and how we wage them address systems of oppression.

We have network of 37 locally based coalitions in 23 states across the country working at the state and local levels to advance our collective workers' rights and economic justice agenda. We also have a strong growing online base of over 200,000 who engage in thousands of e-actions around a diverse set of workers' rights and economic justice issues. By bringing together labor, community, student, and faith voices at the national and local levels, we are creating innovative solutions to the problems workers face today. We are the only nonprofit of our kind leading strategic campaigns and shaping the public discourse on every front to build power for working people. Jobs With Justice Education Fund (JWJEF) is committed to working nationally and locally, on the ground and online. We win real change for workers by combining innovative communications strategies and solid research and policy analysis.

Our notable accomplishments to date have included:
 Over two million home care workers qualifying for minimum wage and overtime protections. We were instrumental in the broader work to overturn the companionship exemption rule in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 through our Caring Across Generations campaign. The rule change allows over 2 million home care workers, majority women, to qualify for minimum wage and overtime protections.
 JWJEF and our San Francisco affiliate led a successful campaign in 2014 to enact the Retail Workers Bill of Rights. San Francisco became the first city in the U.S. to adopt a landmark retail workers bill of rights for an estimated 40,000 hourly employees of massively profitable chain stores and restaurants. The ordinances will serve as the first meaningful policies in the nation to ensure more workers in this industry have job more predictable schedules and income.
 Our network has been instrumental in advancing vibrant campaigns to raise wages across the country. Successes in these efforts include in Missouri, where our affiliate MO Jobs With Justice led a successful campaign to boost the minimum wage in St. Louis City to $11. In New York State, our coalitions were part of our cohort that helped to establish a Wage Board that won approval for a proposal recommending the state of NY require large food franchises to pay workers a $15 minimum wage. And Massachusetts, our MA Jobs With Justice affiliate played a key role in winning an agreement for a $15 an hour starting wage for more than 35,000 personal care attendants making MA the first state to guarantee a living wage for home-care providers.

Financials

Jobs with Justice Education Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Jobs with Justice Education Fund

Board of directors
as of 10/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Denise Diaz

Central Florida Jobs With Justice

Todd Crosby

United Food and Commercial Workers

Nicole Berner

Service Employees International Union

John Bielak

Ironworkers

Tefere Gebre

AFL-CIO

Jojo Morinvil

United Students Against Sweatshops

Caitlyn Adams

Missouri Jobs With Justice

John Cavanagh

Institute for Policy Studies

Elissa McBride

AFSCME

Chris Sanders

Chris Sanders Law PLLC

Maritza Silva-Farrell

ALIGN

David Blumenstein

Segal Company

Raquel Laviña

National Domestic Workers Alliance

Brian Hale

Ullico

Erica Smiley

Jobs With Justice Education Fund

Deepak Pateriya

Community Change

Ken Rigmaiden

International Union of Painters and Allied Trades