GOLD2022

District of Columbia Appleseed Center for Law and Justice, Inc.

DC Appleseed Center for Law and Justice 1111 14th Street NW, Suite 510 | Washington, DC 20005

aka DC Appleseed Center   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.dcappleseed.org

Mission

For over 25 years, through litigation, teamwork, and advocacy, DC Appleseed has helped make the District of Columbia a better place to live and work. Throughout our history, we have taken on some of the District’s toughest problems, developed proposed solutions to those problems, and then worked to get our proposed solutions adopted and implemented. Our efforts, however, continue beyond implementation. We monitor the implementation to make sure that policies designed to benefit District residents, particularly low-income residents and people of color, actually work as intended. The thousands of hours of pro bono time donated by our volunteer attorneys, business leaders, and community experts multiply the impact of our financial support with us on numerous projects over the past 25 years.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Mrs. Vanessa Batters-Thompson

Main address

1111 14th St. NW Ste 510

Washington, DC 20005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1891162

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Public Finance, Taxation, Monetary Policy (W22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

DC HIV/AIDS Project

The District of Columbia has one of the highest rates of new AIDS cases in the country. DC Appleseed annually issues a report card assessing the District’s progress in tackling the epidemic. DC Appleseed also participates in the D.C. Syringe Access Working Group to address policy challenges regarding syringe access and complementary services. Pro bono partners: Hogan Lovells LLP and Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

D.C. residents continue to be denied voting representation in Congress, even though Congress is the city’s ultimate governing body. DC Appleseed has served as the primary legal architect of the effort to give the District voting rights, and is devising both local and federal strategies to bring full democracy to D.C. residents.
Pro bono partners: Arent Fox LLP; Jenner & Block; Latham & Watkins LLP; Perkins Coie LLP; and Sidley Austin LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed is working to transform the Anacostia River from one of the nation’s most polluted into a national model for urban river revitalization by advocating for reductions in stormwater pollution, sewer overflows, and toxic contamination. Pro bono partners: Covington & Burling LLP; Gilbert LLP; Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP; Squire Patton Boggs LLP; and Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

Because two-thirds of the working poor families in the District are headed by single women, DC Appleseed is working to design career ladders, raise wages and improve working conditions in occupations dominated by women, in particular home health care. This work is part of DC Appleseed’s participation in The Working Poor Families Project. Pro bono partners: Arnold & Porter LLP.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth

Despite having some of the highest health insurance coverage rates in the nation, D.C. children suffer disproportionately from a host of chronic health problems, including asthma and obesity. DC Appleseed has partnered with Children’s National Medical Center, the Urban Institute, and the DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative (DCPNI) to address disparities and improve health outcomes for children, particularly in low-income families. Pro bono partner: Mayer Brown LLP and Skadden.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

For many years we have advocated for enhancing the integrity and independence of the D.C. Office of the Attorney General. We urged letting voters decide whether they wanted an elected Attorney General in a 2010 referendum. After voters decided that they did, we worked to ensure that the first election takes place in 2014, successfully arguing in an amicus brief that the D.C. Court of Appeals should consider that this was the people’s intent in the referendum. Pro bono partners: Goldblatt Martin Pozen LLP; Latham & Watkins LLP; Perkins Coie LLP; and Troutman Sanders LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people
Economically disadvantaged people

DC Appleseed is advocating for publicly financed elections in D.C, so that local government is more responsive to the public interest, to lessen corporate involvement in elections, and to help restore public trust in government.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

CareFirst—the largest health insurance company in the region—was chartered by Congress as a “charitable and benevolent” non-profit, and under District law must maintain a surplus consistent with its obligation to maximize community health reinvestment. In 2012, we won a sweeping decision by the D.C. Court of Appeals that the former D.C. Insurance Commissioner failed to apply that law. We are now participating in the current Commissioner’s review of the company’s nearly $1 billion surplus. Pro bono partners: Covington & Burling LLP; Harkins Cunningham LLP; and Mathematica Policy Research.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

Child support helps lift children out of poverty, but most of the children in the District’s child support system—30,000 out of 50,000—do not receive the child support they are owed. DC Appleseed is working to increase collaboration between the District’s workforce development and child support enforcement systems to help low-income parents earn sufficient incomes to pay their child support. Pro bono partner: Crowell & Moring LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed is helping the District raise the quality of its early childhood education system by advocating better compensation and access to higher education for early childhood teachers, especially those who work in community-based programs. This work is part of our Working Poor Families initiative. Pro bono partners: Squire Patton Boggs LLP and Zuckerman Spaeder LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed is working to improve D.C. residents’ opportunities to make timely, informed choices about the nature of care they wish to receive at the end of their lives. We also seek to improve the medical community’s ability to respond to these choices. Pro bono partners: Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP; Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP; and Shipman & Goodwin LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed is advocating for the Council’s authority to enact sensible gun control measures consistent with the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in District of Columbia v. Heller. We seek to defend the District’s gun laws from undue congressional interference.
Pro bono partners: Arent Fox LLP; Harkins Cunningham LLP; and Hogan Lovells LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed is advocating for ensuring that affordable housing is provided whenever the District disposes of public land for private residential development. A D.C. Council committee unanimously approved a bill establishing this requirement, and it will likely go before the full body this fall. This proposal was guided by our experience monitoring development along the Anacostia Waterfront to ensure that legal obligations for affordable housing are met there. Pro bono partners: Deloitte & Touche US LLP; Holland & Knight LLP; Steptoe & Johnson LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

Much of the District’s drinking water flows through lead pipes, creating the potential for spikes in lead levels that can pose a special threat to the health and development of young children. DC Appleseed is advocating for better monitoring and public reporting of lead levels, improved communication when elevated lead levels are suspected in a community, greater education on the dangers of lead exposure and measures residents can take to reduce exposure. Pro bono partners: Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLP and Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed continues to advocate for strategies that will reduce the District’s reliance on litigation to resolve special education disputes, in order to help special education students get the services they need and get them more quickly. Our current effort focuses on improving the likelihood of success for special education students who are returning to the District from non-public schools. Pro bono partners: DLA Piper LLP and Reed Smith LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed is advocating for the District to reform its federally-funded workforce development system—including its one-stop career centers—to better meet the needs of both job seekers and businesses. Pro bono partner: Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

DC Appleseed worked with the District to create a Workforce Intermediary to match hospitality and construction employers with qualified District residents as new jobs become available. Pro bono partner: Steptoe & Johnson LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

In 2013, D.C. voters overwhelmingly ratified a Charter amendment giving the District the right to spend local revenue without an affirmative act of Congress. We developed the legal theory behind the amendment and successfully advocated for its approval by the D.C. Council and the Board of Elections. We are now supporting the Council’s lawsuit to enforce the new law and coordinated the filing of several amicus briefs. Pro bono partners: Arent Fox LLP; Goldblatt Martin Pozen LLP; Latham & Watkins LLP; and Perkins Coie LLP.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Awards

Distinguished Community Advocate Award (for ED Walter Smith) 2008

DC Primary Care Association

Distinguished Service Award 2007

Gay and Lesbian Activist Alliance

90 Greatest Washington Lawyers of the Last 30 Years (for ED Walter Smith) 2008

Legal Times

Dace Stone Memorial Leadership Award 2005

PreventionWorks

Presidential Award of Excellence 2005

District of Columbia Hospital Association

Financials

District of Columbia Appleseed Center for Law and Justice, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

District of Columbia Appleseed Center for Law and Justice, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Annemargaret Connolly

Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

Deborah Chollet

Mathematica

Bill Stein

Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP

Hank Brothers

Hank Brothers Law

Lorelie Masters

Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP

Robert Bobb

The Robert Bobb Group

Victor Bonett

Amazon

Sean Krispinsky

American Beverage Association

Apera Nwora

Washington Gas

Robert Peck

Gensler LLP

Thorn Pozen

Goldblatt Martin Pozen LLP

Michele Blackwell

Uber

Gary Ratner

Citizens for Effective Schools, Inc.

Chris Wright

Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis LLP

Eleanor Smith

Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

Steven Stanton

Deloitte Advisory

Josh Wyner

The Aspen Institute

Rick Bress

Latham & Watkins LLP

Marialuisa Gallozzi

Covington LLP

Jeffrey Handwerker

Arnold & Porter LLP

Beth Halpern

Hogan Lovells US LLP

Karen Hardwick

Washington Gas

Katherine Broderick

UDC - David A. Clarke School of Law

Olivia Byrne

K&L Gates LLP

Patrick Campbell

Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP

Rev. Kendrick Curry

The Pennsylvania Ave Baptist Church

Peter Denton

Steptoe & Johnson LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No