Human Services

New River Community Action, Inc.

  • Radford, VA
  • http://www.newrivercommunityaction.org

Mission Statement

Community Action was established over fifty years ago by Congress as a centerpiece of the War on Poverty.
New River Community Action (NRCA) is a non-profit organization working hand-in-hand with local communities to address conditions of poverty. We operate programs that help meet basic needs as well as programs that help young children and their families.
NRCA holds the conviction that poverty and hunger are not acceptable conditions in communities and believe that ending poverty is an attainable goal through joint community efforts.
NRCA serves the New River Valley section of Virginia (Floyd, Giles, Montgomery, Pulaski and Radford) serving about 12,000 local residents each year.

Main Programs

  1. Head Start
  2. Emergency Services Program
  3. Homeless and Housing Programs
  4. Virginia Community Re-Entry System (VA CARES)
  5. Children's Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP)
Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

NRCA serves the New River Valley section of Virginia (Floyd, Giles, Montgomery, Pulaski and Radford) serving about 12,000 local residents each year.

ruling year

1966

Chief Executive Officer since 1988

Self-reported

Ms. Terry Smusz

Keywords

Self-reported

Head Start, homeless, children, family, emergency, hunger, food, volunteer

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Also Known As

NRCA

EIN

54-0793072

 Number

4118676557

Physical Address

1093 East Main Street

Radford, 24141

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

New River Community Action, with the assistance of 1,923 volunteers who worked 65,814 hours, provided the following services to 13,538* unduplicated individuals in 2014-2015:

EMERGENCY FOOD was provided to 5,644 individuals in 2,566 families through six food pantries.

• VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE (VITA) was provided free of charge for 601 families who saved $120,200 in tax preparation fees.

• The HEAD START PROGRAM provided comprehensive education, nutrition, health, parent involvement and social services to 365 pre-school children.

• EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE was provided to 2,627 families (6,407 individuals) alleviating their financial crises. Assistance with applying for electric bill payments through Neighbor-to-Neighbor was provided to 1894 families consisting of 4,472 individuals.

• HOUSING COUNSELING was provided to 101 households (208 individuals) leading to improved housing.

• HOMELESS and HOUSING PROGRAMs assisted 70 households (149 individuals) to obtain or maintain permanent housing through assistance with utility and security deposits, moving costs, and temporary rental assistance ($170,213).

• CHILDREN'S HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP (CHIP) of the New River Valley provided 136 families with 232 children (age 0-6) with improved health care, parent education and case management.

• VIRGINIA CARES provided assistance to 146 ex-offenders to promote successful transition from prison or jail to society.

• INFORMATION AND REFERRAL SERVICES were provided to 5,936 families.

• FORMAL and INFORMAL PARTNERSHIPS were maintained with 174 organizations.

• STAFF SUPPORT OR OFFICE SPACE was provided to three agencies or organizations; 6,452 low- income individuals benefited.

• FLOYD BACK PACK PROGRAM served 179 children in 83 families.

• FAMILY OUTREACH CONNECTIONS screened and referred 65 families to local home visiting programs and facilitated 187 visits to the Baby Shops.

• TO OUR HOUSE winter shelter served 52 homeless men providing 1,141 bed-nights, and a total of 3,423 meals. Fourteen host churches and 36 support churches/organization participated in the program. Nine hundred thirty-three volunteers provided 8,663 hours of service to men experiencing homelessness.

• Eighteen AMERICORPS MEMBERS provided a combined 10,848 service hours in these program areas: Head Start, Homeless and Housing Programs, VITA, MCEAP, and To Our House.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Head Start

HEAD START provides comprehensive developmental services to eligible pre-school children and their families. Family-focused services emphasize education, nutrition, parent involvement, social services and preventative health care.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Budget

$3,021,544.00

Program 2

Emergency Services Program

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE / FOOD PANTRIES AND CLOTHING provides assistance for clothing, utilities, heating fuel, health needs, rent or mortgage plus access and referral to other organizations. Food pantries are available for those in need.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Homeless

Budget

$871,735.00

Program 3

Homeless and Housing Programs

The mission of HOMELESS AND HOUSING PROGRAMS is to prevent and alleviate homelessness by providing temporary rental assistance, stabilization case management, group education, and housing counseling to individuals and families that allows them to obtain or maintain permanent housing.
HHP provides three services: Financial assistance through Prevention, which provides grants to clients who are up to six months behind in their rental payments, and through Rapid Rehousing, which provides grants to clients who are homeless to obtain permanent housing; Counseling in pre-purchase, post-purchase, foreclosure prevention, rental and homeless issues; and Education through renter workshops.

Category

Housing

Population(s) Served

Homeless

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$278,537.00

Program 4

Virginia Community Re-Entry System (VA CARES)

The VA CARES program provided 87 ex-offenders with assistance to promote a successful transition from prison or jail to society.

Virginia Community Re-Entry System (VA CARES) is a community-based effort to assist ex-offenders. 

The program focuses on the community perspective, to prevent further criminal activity and restore the fabric of the family and community in crisis as a result of imprisonment. VA CARES has been shown to reduce recidivism, thereby minimizing individual criminal involvement and saving taxpayer dollars. Through guidance and linkages with employment and other community resources, Virginia CARES provides opportunities for ex-prisoners to become self-sufficient, law-abiding, taxpaying, family-oriented citizens of society.

A local 15-member Advisory Board supports NRCA’s VA CARES program through community advocacy and resource collaboration.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Offenders/Ex-offenders

Budget

$104,813.00

Program 5

Children's Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP)

CHIP provides access to primary health care to families with children birth to age six. Parent education and support for family goals is provided through home visiting case management services.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    NATIONAL COMMUNITY ACTION GOALS

    GOAL 1: HELP LOW-INCOME PEOPLE BECOME MORE SELF-SUFFICIENT
    Employment and Education are the two most important factors leading to self-sufficiency.
    Program staff works with customers to find permanent employment, healthcare, transportation, and childcare.

    GOAL 2: IMPROVE CONDITIONS IN WHICH LOW-INCOME PEOPLE LIVE
    NRCA helps low-income families and individuals to obtain or remain in safe and affordable housing.

    GOAL 3: ENCOURAGE LOW-INCOME PEOPLE TO OWN A STAKE IN THEIR COMMUNITY
    Staff and customers are invited to take part in volunteer activities, councils, and committees that have positive impact on the community. Participation in program advisory councils and committees give our customers a chance to contribute their ideas.

    GOAL 4: CREATE PARTNERSHIPS AMONG SERVICE PROVIDERS AND LOW-INCOME FAMILIES
    NRCA builds committed partnerships and agreements with organizations, area services, and community supporters to ensure our customers' success. These partnerships are essential for comprehensive customer care.

    GOAL 5: INCREASE AGENCY CAPACITY TO HELP MORE LOW-INCOME FAMILIES
    As the pressure for limited resources increases, NRCA must successfully manage its finances and raise additional funds to continue providing essential services. These realities call for NRCA to bring forth its collective experience and expertise to meet new demands through innovative, pro-active cost containment, financial management, and fund development strategies.

    GOAL 6: STRENGTHEN LOW-INCOME FAMILY SUPPORT SYSTEM
    NRCA builds strong families by providing supportive services that give families the tools and resources to succeed and achieve financial independence, while embracing core family values. NRCA believes in building strong families to build strong communities.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Goal 1: Develop/expand relationships with faith-based organizations, human services and colleges and universities in their communities to address areas of need.
    Goal 2: Explore income producing opportunities such as special events and for-profit ventures.
    Goal 3: Tell our poverty story better (causes, cycle, etc.) “No Stories Without Data, No Data Without Stories"
    Goal 4: Utilize latest technological resources for internal and external business (i.e. social media)
    Goal 5: Increase utilization of Board resources (i.e. Board skills assessment)
    Goal 6: Develop additional ways to reward staff (non-monetary) including professional growth opportunities.
    Goal 7: Identify one improvement for each program that would reduce stress (increase efficiency) in that program.
    Goal 8: Improve staff salaries and fringes.



  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    1A. The NRCA staff and Board will increase by 30% the number of faith-based organizations engaging with NRCA to support our mission.
    1B. The NRCA staff will increase by 30% the number of human service agencies engaging with NRCA to support our mission.
    1C. The NRCA staff will increase by 30% the number of agency activities with colleges and universities.
    2A. Board of Directors will determine NRCA's suitability for adding one revenue-producing special event to support the NRCA General Fund.
    2B. Board of Directors will determine NRCA's suitability for adding one revenue-producing for-profit venture to support the NRCA General Fund.
    3A. The NRCA staff will track and report data for at least two outputs or outcomes per program utilizing national community action ROMA performance indicators.
    3B. The NRCA staff will incorporate at least one web-based poverty education resource to agency website and Facebook pages.
    3D. The NRCA staff will apply to at least three funding sources for resources to purchase digital story telling training and equipment.
    3F. Public Relations and Resource Development Committee will develop the NRCA elevator speech for use by staff and leadership volunteers.
    3G. Public Relations and Resource Development Committee will develop a NRCA and NRCA Head Start 50th Anniversary Celebration Committee that will be responsible for planning and carrying out anniversary activities during 2015.
    4A. NRCA staff will centralize IT services as much as possible for NRCA's one-person department.


    4B. The NRCA MIS Committee will develop an IT budget for FY 2015-16 and annually thereafter.
    4C. The MIS Committee will implement an effective user- friendly collaborative communication tool for use by all NRCA staff.
    4D. NRCA staff will increase by 30% number of social media tools utilized by NRCA.  
    5A. Staff, working with Board, will compile a list of Board skills, including availability of time to share skills at NRCA.
    5B. Staff will share agency volunteer needs with Board of Directors monthly.
    6A. Senior Management will reward high performing line staff with conference opportunities.
    6B. Staff Total Appreciation & Recognition Committee will develop and implement monthly employee recognition program.
    6C. STAR Committee will develop annual employee yearbook.
    6D. STAR Committee will research the possible return of the NRCA All Staff Recognition Day.
    6E. Senior Management will oversee NRCA jurisdiction -wide staff gatherings for purposes of networking and information sharing.
    8A. Staff and Board will review Affordable Care Act and other fringe benefit options, and review implications for staff and budgets.
    8B. Staff will research salary determination tools, compare to NRCA's current tool and develop recommendation.
    8C. Senior Management will review program and department restructuring with a goal of freeing up money to improve staff salaries.
    8D. Senior Management will coordinate with outside volun
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Outcomes and measurements are reviewed bi-annually by the Board of Directors oversight committee(s): Public Relations and Resource Development, Program Planning and Evaluation, Personnel and Finance.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Action Steps Outcome Measurement
    The Public Relations/Resource Development and Finance Committees will coordinate with staff to develop a survey to assess the characteristics of successful revenue-producing special events. Completed May 2015 Survey instrument
    Staff will conduct internet research on characteristics of successful revenue-producing special events. Completed May 2015 Summary document
    Staff and Board members will brainstorm for-profit venture ideas that complement the NRCA mission and compile a list. Staff surveyed; discussion held with Board Nov. 2914 List of for-profit venture ideas
    Finance Director will coordinate with the NRCA auditor and attorney to explore the legal issues and auditing laws related to operating a for-profit venture within a non-profit. Written findings will be shared with the full Board. Revision: If a proposed project is selected, seek attorney review at that time. Auditor recommends projects should align with NRCA mission; attorney will be contacted if NRCA pursues idea October 2014 Finance Committee minutes
    Planning Director will train key program staff leaders on tracking and reporting program outputs and outcomes according to ROMA (Results Oriented Management and Accountability) performance indicators as required by federal and state community action funding agencies. Training completed fall 2014
    Each key program staff leader will select at least two or more ROMA performance indicators for tracking and reporting. Indicators selected fall 2014 Indicators in CSBG work plan & reports
    Staff and Board will recruit staff and Board volunteers to form the 50th Anniversary Committee. Completed summer 2014 List of members, Committee minutes
    3G. Public Relations and Resource Development Committee will develop a NRCA and NRCA Head Start 50th Anniversary Celebration Committee that will be responsible for planning and carrying out anniversary activities during 2015. COMPLETE
    4A. NRCA staff will centralize IT services as much as possible for NRCA's one-person department. COMPLETE
    4C. The MIS Committee will implement an effective user- friendly collaborative communication tool for use by all NRCA staff. Revision: IT consultant will work with senior management to implement an effective user- friendly collaborative communication tool for use by all NRCA staff.
    Revision objective target date: December 31, 2016
    5A. Staff, working with Board, will compile a list of Board skills, including availability of time to share skills at NRCA. COMPLETE/UPDATE ANNUALLY
    5B. Staff will share agency volunteer needs with Board of Directors monthly. COMPLETE/UPDATE MONTHLY
    6A. Senior Management will reward high performing line staff with conference opportunities. COMPLETE
    8A. Staff and Board will review Affordable Care Act (ACA) and other fringe benefit options, and review implications for NRCA staff and budgets. COMPLETE
Service Areas

Self-reported

Virginia

NRCA serves the New River Valley section of Virginia (Floyd, Giles, Montgomery, Pulaski and Radford) serving about 12,000 local residents each year.

Social Media

Funding Needs

Even before the economic downturn, average Americans struggle to avoid joining the millions of unemployed. Even in “good times,” more than a third of Americans lacked health insurance and millions were unable to afford food. Now, more employers are dropping health care coverage and food banks cannot keep up with rising demand. Energy costs are soaring. Foreclosures are at record levels.  NRCA is facing severe budget gaps that make it harder to respond to needs.   NRCA programs are supported in part by federal, state and local government and private grants, but this funding alone is insufficient to accomplish our goals.  As pressure on resources increase, it is critical that NRCA successfully raise additional funds to ensure its future viability and ability to continue essential services. We rely heavily on the community to maintain and strengthen our programs. New River Community Action was recently highlighted in Washington Post(http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/in-southwest-va-as-more-need-help-aid-organization-has-less-to-give/2011/04/13/AFbvKyqD_story_1.html) .

Videos

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External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

NEW RIVER COMMUNITY ACTION INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

New River Community Action, Inc.

Leadership

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Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Terry Smusz

BIO

Ms. Terry D. Smusz has been Executive Director for NRCA since 1988. She received her Masters from the Florida State University School of Criminology where she studied juvenile delinquency prevention and treatment and her Bachelor's Degree in Sociology from Virginia Tech. She was the previous Executive Director of Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New River Valley. Ms. Smusz received the "Public Citizen of the Year Award" in 1997 presented by the Virginia Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers.

STATEMENT FROM THE Chief Executive Officer

"During the 2013-14 program year, 12,101 New River Valley residents made positive changes in their lives through participation in services provided by New River Community Action.

With assistance from 2,439 volunteers, New River Community Action offered hope and help through services that meet basic needs, strengthen families, promote school readiness and economic stability. NRCA programs are community-based, designed in collaboration other human service agencies, faith-based and civic organizations. We extend assistance to those in need, serve as a catalyst for opportunity and a voice of advocacy.

We are able to carry forward our mission only with the assistance of our dedicated staff and many volunteers and supporters. They include members of our hardworking Board of Directors, advisory boards and councils, federal, state and local governments, foundations, United Way/United Fund and our donors. Your support is vital and we thank you."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. John McEnhill Jr.

NEW RIVER COMMUNITY ACTION INC

Term: June 2002 - June 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies
Yes
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity