Human Services

The Society of Saint Andrew, Inc.

  • Big Island, VA
  • www.endhunger.org

Mission Statement

The Society of St. Andrew envisions a world without hunger, in which physical and spiritual hungers are met through God's grace and abundance. Basing its work in core values of faith, compassion, stewardship, and service, the Society of St. Andrew's mission is to introduce people to God's grace in Jesus Christ through meeting their hungers: Food for the body; God's word for the spirit; Community of love for the heart; and Opportunity for those who desire action.

Main Programs

  1. The Gleaning Network
  2. The Potato and Produce Project
  3. Harvest of Hope
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

The Society of St. Andrew works within the continental United States, recovering and distributing fresh produce. At the present time, the Society of St. Andrew's Gleaning Network operates in 22 states, sending volunteers into fields and orchards to glean (pick, dig, or gather) what's leftover after harvest, to share with hungry people nearby. The Society of St. Andrew's large-load transportation program, the Potato & Produce Project, currently recovers large loads of food in 35 or more states, and distributes it in 48 states. Harvest of Hope, the Society of St. Andrew's mission workcamp arm, offers educational gleaning retreats in 7-12 states each year.

ruling year

1985

Executive Director since 2017

Self-reported

Ms. Lynette E Johnson

Keywords

Self-reported

hunger, food, feeding the hungry, food bank, nutrition, gleaning

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014.
Register now

Also Known As

Society of St. Andrew

EIN

54-1285793

 Number

7740246333

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The Society of St. Andrew (SoSA) has been engaged in all of these tasks for more than 30 years. Recognized as one of the most effective and efficient hunger relief organizations in the country, SoSA has demonstrated capacity to (1) Keep 15,000 or more tons of fresh produce out of landfills each year; (2) Provide 90-100 million servings of fruits and vegetables to agencies feeding hungry people in 48 states; (3) Work with 1,000 or more produce providers each year (some of these providers have shared excess and unmarketable produce with SoSA for more than 30 years); (4) Engage 30,000-40,000 volunteers each year in at least 22 states in simple, hands-on service to reduce food waste and feed hungry people; (5) Offer volunteers opportunities for study, reflection, and action on root causes and long-term solutions to food waste and hunger, 700+ each year through Harvest of Hope mission/work camps and thousands more through the use of print and online resources developed and distributed by SoSA. (6) Do all of this at a cost of just over 3¢ per serving of food distributed (2016), by generating funding and support from individuals, faith communities, corporations, and foundations across the United States.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

The Gleaning Network

Whether harvested mechanically or by hand, millions of tons of produce that does not meet top market specifications are left behind in the fields during harvest. SoSA coordinates with hundreds of farmers across the country who generously donate their leftover crops to feed the hungry. We then coordinate and supervise field gleaning events where our tens of thousands of volunteers simply pick-up the good crops left behind. Each year, about 3,000 gleaning events are conducted that result in millions of pounds of nutritious produce being saved and distributed to the hungry. SoSA volunteers then take this fresh produce directly to hundreds of feeding agencies and programs right in the local area where the gleaning is conducted. SoSA provides all the coordination and supervision among farmers, volunteers, transportation, and vital feeding programs that receive the food at no cost. Those receiving this nutritious food include: Food Banks (large and small), soup kitchens, homeless shelters, AIDS hospice homes, Salvation Army feeding programs, Senior feeding centers, and a host of other essential feeding programs in local areas. All are in desperate need of the fresh produce that this program provides in order to meet the nutritional need of those they serve.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$10,156,287

Program 2

The Potato and Produce Project

After being harvested, fresh produce is sent to a packing facility where it undergoes another ""grade out"" process before it is packaged for final shipping. Once again, millions of pounds of produce that is perfectly good to eat are discarded as not meeting top market grade. This excess bounty is normally dumped in our nation's landfills when it could be used to feed the hungry instead. SoSA intercepts as much of this food as possible and ships truckloads of this perfectly good, but rejected, produce to all 48 contiguous states. The produce is donated at no cost, but SoSA must pay the packing and freight cost associated with shipping it to feeding agencies across the country. Each truckload saved is about 45,000 pounds of produce that will result in over 135,000 nutritious servings.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$5,436,404

Program 3

Harvest of Hope

Harvest of Hope is a retreat-based program that engages individuals (primarily young people) in gleaning to feed hungry neighbors, and then in study and reflection about causes and solutions to the issues of hunger and food waste in this country. Harvest of Hope encourages participants to make lifelong commitments to engaging in acts of voluntarism that meet short-term hunger needs and in acts of advocacy that address long-term hunger needs.

Category

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$208,449

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of tons of food kept out of landfills

Target Population
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Every ton of food kept out of landfills reduces harmful methane gas emissions by the equivalent of keeping 2.236 cars off the road for a year.

2. Number of servings of fresh fruits and vegetables shared with hungry people in the US

Target Population
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
All of this food is perfectly fresh, tasty, nutritious, and safe to eat. It is simply excess or unmarketable for cosmetic or marketing reasons.

3. Number of volunteers engaged in simple, hands-on service

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Volunteers come from all ages and all walks of life. It's not uncommon for a banker to be gleaning side by side with a homeless person, or a senior to glean beside a parent and her young children.

4. Number of produce providers

Target Population
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Providers share their excess & unmarketable produce in the way it's most convenient for them, whether that's inviting gleaners into their fields or calling when they have a truckload for us to pickup

5. Number of agencies receiving food to share with clients/guests

Target Population
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Agencies "on the ground" in locales across the country receive this good food to share with their clients. Because they receive it at no cost, this frees agency budgets for other critical client needs

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    A. Reducing food waste by keeping fresh, but commercially unmarketable fruits and vegetables out of landfills.
    B. Ending hunger by meeting the short-term nutritional needs of our country's most vulnerable residents, providing fresh, healthy fruits and vegetables to supplement their diets, at no cost.
    C. Engaging volunteers from all walks of life in simple, hands-on service that both reduces food waste and feeds hungry people
    D. Empowering concerned individuals and faith communities to act and advocate for long-term, sustainable solutions to the entrenched environmental problem of food waste and the entrenched socio-political problem of hunger in this country.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    A. Reducing food waste by keeping fresh, but commercially unmarketable fruits and vegetables out of landfills.
    1. Building relationships with farmers, growers, packing houses, and trucking companies, by
    2. Introducing the Society of St. Andrew and its work, and encouraging and/or incentivizing produce providers to work with the Society of St. Andrew to keep food they have grown or transported from going to waste by allowing diversion at the point where waste would occur.
    B. Ending hunger by meeting the short-term nutritional needs of our country's most vulnerable residents, providing fresh, healthy fruits and vegetables to supplement their diets, at no cost.
    1. Charting a nation-wide network of receiving agencies (soup kitchens, shelters, small local food pantries, large regional food banks, senior and child nutrition programs, emergency and disaster relief programs, etc.) to share or prepare and serve this good food with their clients/guests.
    2. Developing a safe, simple, scalable, efficient, cost-effective, timely, replicable, and flexible process for getting food from the point of acquisition to the point of distribution that does not place undue burdens on either the produce donor or the produce recipient.
    C. Engaging volunteers from all walks of life in simple, hands-on service that both reduces food waste and feeds hungry people
    1. Establishing a simple, local, scalable, efficient, cost-effective, timely, replicable, and flexible system for mobilizing, notifying, training, engaging, supervising, and thanking volunteers in locations across the country to glean (pick, dig, or gather) or bag fresh fruits and vegetables at farms, packinghouses, or other point of acquisition near their home.
    2. Continually and seasonally re-engaging volunteers in this work, maintaining contact in a way that continues to keep them interested in and energized about the work.
    D. Empowering concerned individuals and faith communities to act and advocate for long-term, sustainable solutions to the entrenched environmental problem of food waste and the entrenched socio-political problem of hunger in this country.
    1. Creating opportunities for volunteers to have hands-on involvement in reducing food waste and ending hunger through gleaning, correlated with opportunities for study, reflection, and action on root causes and long-term solutions.
    2. Systematically connecting volunteers with partner 501(c)(4) organizations focused on advocacy around long-term, sustainable solutions to food waste and hunger.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The Society of St. Andrew (SoSA) has been engaged in all of these tasks for more than 30 years. Recognized as one of the most effective and efficient hunger relief organizations in the country, SoSA has demonstrated capacity to
    • Keep 15,000 or more tons of fresh produce out of landfills each year
    • Provide 90-100 million servings of fruits and vegetables to agencies feeding hungry people in 48 states
    • Work with 1,000 or more produce providers each year (some of these providers have shared excess and unmarketable produce with SoSA for more than 30 years)
    • Engage 30,000-40,000 volunteers each year in at least 22 states in simple, hands-on service to reduce food waste and feed hungry people
    • Offer volunteers opportunities for study, reflection, and action on root causes and long-term solutions to food waste and hunger, 700+ each year through Harvest of Hope mission/work camps and thousands more through the use of print and online resources developed and distributed by SoSA.
    • Do all of this at a cost of just over 3¢ per serving of food distributed (2016), by generating funding and support from individuals, faith communities, corporations, and foundations across the United States.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Quantitatively, the Society of St. Andrew measures progress by tracking a number of Measures of Effectiveness, including: pounds of food recovered/distributed; geographic reach of operations; number of volunteers, gleaning events, produce providers, receiving agencies; users of programmatic materials (studies and guidebooks); and number of participants in Harvest of Hope mission/work camps.
    Qualitatively, the Society of St. Andrew measures progress anecdotally, through occasional surveys of constituencies (agencies, recipients, volunteers, providers, etc.) and through the geographic reach of its network.
    The Board of Directors considers both quantitative and qualitative factors in its bi-annual Effectiveness review.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Though we long for, and work day after day, for the time when there will be no hunger in this country, toward the time when no food will be waste, we know that the Society of St. Andrew's work will continue to be necessary and important to meet the short-term needs of millions of people who are struggling to get by.
    We know that the fresh fruits and vegetables the Society of St. Andrew provides supply both calories and critical nutrients for hungry people, and we know that providing this good food to low-income individuals at no cost eases the burden of household expenses. It may also lead to better short- and long-term health outcomes, as it improves the quality of nutrition available to them.
    We also know, through the work of the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the ReFED report, and other recent, well-researched reports, that the volume of food waste in this country is staggering: more than 20 billion pounds of healthy, fresh, edible produce each year is left behind in fields and packing houses, graded out because it isn't pretty enough for grocery store sale, mispackaged, mislabeled, or misdirected in shipping, or even rejected at a distribution center or warehouse. This is food that, without intervention, will simply be left to rot in the field or dumped in a landfill.
    We know the food is available, and we know there are hungry people in every part of the United States who would welcome the opportunity to eat it.
    The challenges in diverting this food to share with hungry people are logistical and financial. 30+ years of consistent work and proven results demonstrate that the Society of St. Andrew has the knowledge, experience, geographic range, and flexibility to meet nearly every logistical challenge. That our produce recovery and distribution has been limited to 25-35 million pounds of food a year reflects solely financial constraints on our work. Our work is replicable and scalable, with no loss of efficiency. Growing the work depends solely on increasing the financial resources available to the Society of St. Andrew to do this work.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

The Society of St. Andrew works within the continental United States, recovering and distributing fresh produce. At the present time, the Society of St. Andrew's Gleaning Network operates in 22 states, sending volunteers into fields and orchards to glean (pick, dig, or gather) what's leftover after harvest, to share with hungry people nearby. The Society of St. Andrew's large-load transportation program, the Potato & Produce Project, currently recovers large loads of food in 35 or more states, and distributes it in 48 states. Harvest of Hope, the Society of St. Andrew's mission workcamp arm, offers educational gleaning retreats in 7-12 states each year.

Social Media

Funding Needs

Though we long for, and work day after day, for the time when there will be no hunger in this country, toward the time when no food will be waste, we know that the Society of St. Andrew's work will continue to be necessary and important to meet the short-term needs of millions of people who are struggling to get by. We know that the fresh fruits and vegetables the Society of St. Andrew provides supply both calories and critical nutrients for hungry people, and we know that providing this good food to low-income individuals at no cost eases the burden of household expenses. It may also lead to better short- and long-term health outcomes, as it improves the quality of nutrition available to them. We also know, through the work of the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the ReFED report, and other recent, well-researched reports, that the volume of food waste in this country is staggering: more than 20 billion pounds of healthy, fresh, edible produce each year is left behind in fields and packing houses, graded out because it isn't pretty enough for grocery store sale, mispackaged, mislabeled, or misdirected in shipping, or even rejected at a distribution center or warehouse. This is food that, without intervention, will simply be left to rot in the field or dumped in a landfill. We know the food is available, and we know there are hungry people in every part of the United States who would welcome the opportunity to eat it. The challenges in diverting this food to share with hungry people are logistical and financial. 30+ years of consistent work and proven results demonstrate that the Society of St. Andrew has the knowledge, experience, geographic range, and flexibility to meet nearly every logistical challenge. That our produce recovery and distribution has been limited to 25-35 million pounds of food a year reflects solely financial constraints on our work. Our work is replicable and scalable, with no loss of efficiency. Growing the work depends solely on increasing the financial resources available to the Society of St. Andrew to do this work.

Accreditations

Videos

photos


External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

The Society of St Andrew Inc
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

Sign In or Create Account to view Revenue and Expenses information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

The Society of Saint Andrew, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Executive Director

Ms. Lynette E Johnson

BIO

Lynette Johnson has been with the Society of St. Andrew since 2010. Her first assignment with the organization took her to Nashville, where she served as Regional Director for Tennessee and Alabama. She extended SoSA's gleaning network into Tennessee and oversaw day-to-day operations in both states, putting 14 million servings of nourishing produce on the tables of Alabamians and Tennesseans at risk for hunger in just three years. In 2013, she was called to SoSA's national headquarters as the organization's Director of Church Relations. In this role, she worked with congregations throughout the country, promoting the Society of St. Andrew's ministry, resources, and giving and volunteer opportunities.

Prior to joining the Society of St. Andrew's staff, Lynette enjoyed an 18-year first career as a church educator and supply pastor, and an 8-year second career as a magazine editor and art director. She is a Certified Christian Educator and Ruling Elder in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Lynette grew up in Huntsville, Alabama, one of five children in a NASA family. She holds a BA in Religion from the College of William & Mary (1982) and an MA in Christian Education from Scarritt Graduate School (1986).

STATEMENT FROM THE Executive Director

"For nearly 40 years, the Society of St. Andrew (SoSA) has led the way in sharing healthy food with hungry people throughout the United States. Through its dynamic, grassroots, neighbor helping neighbor model for food recovery and distribution, SoSA keeps healthy fruits and vegetables out of landfills and shares God's abundance with those in greatest need.
By staying laser-focused on our core mission, the Society of St. Andrew is both extremely effective and extremely efficient, recovering and distributing 25-35 million pounds (75-105 million servings) of food each year, at a cost of about 9¢ a pound or 3¢ per serving. With a lean, talented, and dedicated staff, a committed Board of Directors, a huge cohort of willing volunteers all across the country, a broad network of produce providers and an even broader network of agencies ready to receive good food to share with their clients, the Society of St. Andrew is poised for growth—and with 42 million people in this country who don't always know where their next meal is coming from, we know there is great need. We believe God is calling and equipping us to do more.
I look forward to meeting you and to sharing stories with you about how your gifts can make a difference in people's lives through the work of the Society of St. Andrew. We are so grateful for all the partnerships and prayers that, across time and distance, have built this ministry and shared health and hope with so many, in Christ's name.
"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Ms. Ann Vest

Episcopal Relief and Development, Retired

Term: Jan 2016 - Dec 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?