endPoverty.org

Transforming lives through microenterprise

aka End Poverty   |   Reston, VA   |  http://www.endpoverty.org

Mission

Our mission is to provide hard-working men and women with economic and spiritual resources that unleash their capacities and liberate them from the entanglements of poverty. We believe that the smartest and dignifying way to end poverty is by providing the poor with the opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty. Since 1985, we have helped individuals start more than 200,000 small businesses, who have in turn created so many more jobs in 37 different countries, helping to transform and enrich whole communities.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Mr. Peter Fry

Main address

1930 Isaac Newton Square Suite 203

Reston, VA 20190 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Enterprise Development International

Transformation

EIN

54-1371549

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

Christian (X20)

Economic Development (S30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over 767 million people in the world today live on less than a $1.9 a day. 815 million people suffer from chronic hunger. 29,000 children die every day from poverty-related illnesses. In the developing world, the majority of people live day-to-day, struggling to provide for their families' most basic needs. The level of need is overwhelming and, in many cases, assistance from the developed world produces dependence and crushes initiative, rather than building dignity and producing self-reliance.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

India - CSS India

Our partner in India, CSS India, serves thousands of very poor families in and around Kolkata by providing small loans and
business support to poor entrepreneurs, equipping them to support themselves,
their families, and contribute to their communities in ways never before
possible.  In addition to cash
loans, CSS disburses assets including van rickshaws, sewing machines and bicycles
as well as income-producing animals, such as cows, goats, and chickens, so that
businesses can be started, maintained and grown.  CSS has also initiated and supported a number of community outreach initiatives, including animal husbandry programs, two homes for poor and
orphaned children, and numerous village-level pastoral and teaching ministries. .

Population(s) Served

Our partner in the Philippines, the Center for
Community Transformation (CCT), serves urban and
rural poor communities throughout the Philippines, in pursuit of its desire to
see changed lives, strong families, and transformed communities anchored in Christian principles.  They offer training, encouragement, and very small loans to enable poor families to create small businesses that generate income to provide basic food, housing, education and health needs.  In addition to microentrepreneurs, CCT reaches out to service workers, itinerant vendors, orphans, indigenous peoples, landless agricultural workers, fisher folk and abandoned children in urban poor communities. They operate schools, childrens' homes, programs for individuals and families living on the streets, vocational training and development programs, clinics and disaster relief operations, clean water projects and a generic pharmaceutical distribution business. These service projects are supported by revenue from small fees charged for for the services and by funds generated by CCT's microenterprise loan program.

Population(s) Served

Our partner in Cameroon, the Women's Initiative for Health Education and Economic Development in
Cameroon (WINHEEDCAM), works to alleviate poverty
through the socio-economic empowerment of women and persons with disabilities in rural areas. WINHEEDCAM's programs focus on HIV, AIDS, cholera and malaria awareness, treatment and prevention  on economic development (through the provision of a micro-credit loan program which finances small scale business activities).

Population(s) Served

Our partner in Guatemala, Potter's House, serves and empowers families
living and working in the Guatemala City garbage dump (the largest dump in Latin America). More than 11,000 people live and work
in and near the dum500 of them are children. These individuals are treated as little better than the garbage that shapes their existence,
which in turn leads them to believe that they are the refuse of the world. In their own words, Potter's House Association "exists to change the living situation for these thousands, because they are
human beings, beloved children of the one true God, worthy of respect and
dignity. They are Treasures of immeasurable worth, both to our Lord Jesus
Christ and to us".  Through humanitarian aid,
life skills development, character development, vocational and technical skills
training, microloans and small business development support, Potter's House helps individuals and families build a stable, liveable environment for themselves and their community.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To provide hard-working men and women with economic and spiritual resources that unleash their capacities and liberate them from the entanglements of poverty.

We partner with faith-based grassroots organizations focused on business solutions, with the potential to change the face of poverty. By equipping these organization with the knowledge and resources to develop and scale to effectively serve the poor in the most needed regions in the world.

We also partner with sustainable and scaled faith-based indigenous organizations in the developing world to create a lasting impact in impoverished communities. We leverage our experience working with local Christian microenterprise organizations in different cultures and stages of development to provide the framework to integrate results driven economic and spiritual development activities.

End Poverty is dedicated to an effective and durable solution to end poverty! This is our Operating Model

We find enterprising poor individuals with potential and the desire to become long-term self-supporting in the most unreached locations in the world.

We fund their enterprise's and equip them with business skills, training, and discipleship. Creating holistic economic opportunities in the community.

We follow and measure the long term social, economic and spiritual impact on the client and community.

This enables each individual to FULFILL their potential to become role models for their community, while creating holistic, economic opportunities in their community.

End Poverty works with a network of grassroots non-profit organizations within the communities they serve to design and implement microenterprise programs that meet the specific economic needs of the particular community.

Since 1985, End Poverty’s indigenous microenterprise programs provide small loans and business training to people living in poor communities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. End Poverty has worked in 33 countries and invested $24M to serve over 2 million hardworking entrepreneurs.

In 2018

• We reached 18,637 people with new loans totaling $2.1 million, giving them the hand up necessary to begin their own small businesses and transform their lives. For those, nearly half a million people, the bonds of poverty are beginning to loosen. For even more, self-reliance is in reach.
• In Bangladesh, we have taken the first steps of a broad expansion of services through our local partner. We have begun designing a curriculum focusing on conflict resolution, business management, and critical thinking. This will allow us to reach 450,000 entrepreneurs, opening more branches in new locations.
• We expanded our reach in Africa by establishing partnerships in Zambia and South Africa, developing opportunities for at-risk youth, integrating them into a church community reaching 236 entrepreneurs.
• Discipleship and evangelistic efforts are paying off in all of the countries we serve. In our new service area in Zambia, there are currently 240 daily staff devotionals, and four monthly fellowship meetings in the local market.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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endPoverty.org

Board of directors
as of 09/09/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Paul Vinogradov

Deloitte

Term: 2016 -

Catherine Gilanshah

No Affliation

Laura Kent

Cornerstone Capital Management

Richard Dean

Baker & McKenzie

Stephen Clouse

Stephen Clouse & Associates

Paul Vinogradov

The Alexander Group, Inc.

Robert Metcalf

Digital Reasoning Systems

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes