International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security

International Justice Mission

aka IJM

Washington, DC

Mission

To protect the poor from violence by rescuing victims, bringing the criminals to justice, restoring survivors to safety and strength, and helping local law enforcement build a safe future that lasts. Our long-term vision is to rescue millions, protect half a billion and make justice for the poor unstoppable.

Ruling Year

1995

CEO

Mr. Gary Haugen

Main Address

PO Box 58147

Washington, DC 20037 USA

Keywords

Justice, International, Mission, Slavery, Sex Trafficking, Forced Labor, Bonded Labor, Gender-based Violence, Rape, Sexual Violence, Property Grabbing, Widows, Orphans, Police Abuse, Poverty

EIN

54-1722887

 Number

0437649960

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

International Human Rights (Q70)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Q01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

Today, more children, women and men are held in slavery than were taken out of Africa over the course of the entire trans-Atlantic slave trade. Experts estimate one woman in five will suffer from rape or attempted rape in her lifetime, and trafficking in humans is estimated to generate profits of $150 billion per year. Slave owners and other criminals often prey on and exploit the most vulnerable—the poor, the young, and those from disadvantaged, marginalized communities—because law enforcement and justice systems do not effectively protect or fight for them. Established laws are rarely enforced in the developing world, so criminals continue to enslave and abuse the poor without fear or accountability. In the face of this epidemic of violence, IJM brings the protection of the law to vulnerable children, women and men by rescuing victims, bringing the criminals to justice, restoring survivors to safety and strength, and helping local law enforcement build a safe future that lasts.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Justice System Transformation

Education and Mobilization

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of victims rescued by IJM and trained partners

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Justice System Transformation

Context notes

We collaborate with local authorities to rescue victims from ongoing violence and bring them to safety.

Number of criminals convicted in local courts

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Justice System Transformation

Context notes

We partner with local police to restrain criminals, and we work alongside prosecutors to represent survivors of violence in court, no matter how long justice takes.

Number of people trained

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Justice System Transformation

Context notes

We train and mentor justice system officials to protect the poor from violence, and we equip local communities to understand violent crimes and how to stop them.

Survivors and their family members currently receiving aftercare services

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Justice System Transformation

Context notes

We join with social workers to restore survivors of violence to safety and strength.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Through over 20 years of field work, IJM staff have witnessed that in developing countries, violence is as much a part of poverty as hunger, disease or homelessness. When basic criminal justice systems are too broken and corrupt to protect the poor, this predatory violence persists unchecked. Criminals know they can rape, enslave, traffic and abuse the poor without fear of police, courts or the law. By stopping criminals and fixing the broken systems so the entire community is safer, we empower families to build better lives for themselves and their children. Additionally, we seek to fuel a global movement of individuals, churches, governments and other institutions engaged in this fight for justice. IJM seeks to change the way the world understands and addresses global poverty and violence against the poor – providing hope and practical solutions to the problem of violence in order to secure a safe path to prosperity for the global poor in the 21st century.

In the communities where we work, we focus on a specific form of violence plaguing the poor. As we defend individual victims, we learn where the justice system is failing to provide protection—and we develop comprehensive plans to partner with local authorities on ways to improve it. Our day-to-day field operations consist of four strategies to combat violence: 1) RESCUE VICTIMS: We help local authorities find individuals and families suffering from violence and bring them to safety; 2) BRING CRIMINALS TO JUSTICE: We work in local courts to ensure traffickers and other criminals are prosecuted and restrained from hurting others; 3) RESTORE SURVIVORS: We provide trauma therapy and counseling to survivors of violence and give survivors education, training and tools to thrive; 4) STRENGTHEN JUSTICE SYSTEMS: We identify gaps in the systems that protect the poor, and then work with police and courts to address these challenges.

For over 20 years, IJM global teams have been on the front lines fighting some of the worst forms of violence in Africa, Latin America, South Asia and Southeast Asia. More than 850 IJM staff work through 17 field offices to combat violence—95% of whom are nationals of the countries where they work. One of IJM’s core values—and the key capacity on which our mission rests—is our ability to build bridges with others. IJM works with government and law enforcement officials, local community-based organizations, and aftercare partners to rescue victims of injustice, restrain criminals, restore survivors and strengthen justice systems. We have also developed rigorous monitoring and evaluation to assess whether our programs are effectively protecting the poor, and how to improve them even more. IJM is a registered 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization and complies with standards set by the Better Business Bureau (BBB).

At IJM, we continually assess our programs through robust monitoring and evaluation. We evaluate our final impact so we can refine and replicate our successful model in other communities where our help us needed. Our ultimate goal is to see overburdened justice systems transformed to protect entire communities from violence. IJM measures progress by setting annual targets for a wide array of metrics including: Victim Rescue, Perpetrator Accountability (Number of Perpetrators Arrested, Charged and Convicted), Abusive Establishments (i.e. trafficking fronts) Closed, and Survivors of Violence Restored. To understand our overall impact in a community, we measure the reduction in the prevalence of the crime and monitor improvements in the local public justice system.

More than 45,000 people have been rescued from violent oppression by IJM and IJM-trained partners. In addition to these individual victims, as a result of IJM's work, justice systems in the communities we have worked are holding criminals accountable and protecting the poor right from the start. For example, in 2006, IJM initiated a Gates Foundation-funded operation called Project Lantern in Cebu, the Philippines, to test a powerful question: When laws are enforced and criminals held accountable, are fewer children exploited in sex trafficking? After four years of IJM's partnership with the justice system, independent auditors found a stunning 79% decrease in the availability of children being sold for sex in Metro Cebu. As a result of Project Lantern, thousands of children in Metro Cebu will never be victims of sexual exploitation. Based on this successful model, IJM measured similarly massive reductions in children being exploited in other project areas in the Philippines in 2016.

External Reviews

Awards & Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance

Charity Navigator

Photos

Financials

International Justice Mission

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2016, 2016 and 2015
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No