Facing Hunger Food Bank

Together, We Are Facing Hunger

Huntington, WV   |  https://www.facinghunger.org/

Mission

It is the mission of Facing Hunger Foodbank to help feed hungry people by distributing nutritious food and grocery product through our network of more than 252 partner agencies throughout 17 counties in KY, OH and WV. We envision a future in which no person in our service region goes hungry.

Ruling year info

1984

Chief Executive Officer

Cynthia Kirkhart

Main address

1327 Seventh Ave

Huntington, WV 25701 USA

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Formerly known as

Huntington Area Food Bank

EIN

55-0625915

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Hunger Relief

Support for our programs comes from a variety of sources. Gifts from Individuals, Grants from Foundations, Workplace Giving Campaigns, and Corporate Sponsorship and Cause-Related Marketing are all sources from which we receive generous financial support. These funds used to carry out our mission of feeding hungry people in our seventeen county service area throughout West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Multiracial people
People of African descent
Families

FHF hosts four additional programs to reach those in our community who are most vulnerable to hunger:

• BackPack Program – FHF partners with elementary schools across five counties in its service area to feed hungry children in the area. This program insures children have enough food to eat on the weekend when they cannot access free and reduced price school meals.
• Mobile Pantry – Up to five times per month, FHF travels to areas known as “food deserts,” areas that lack access to readily available, nutritious food product. These counties experience high levels of poverty and many families struggle with hunger. FHF distributes up to 8,000 pounds of groceries to families
• Senior CSFP – One in six seniors in our community face hunger. Challenges that come naturally with aging make it difficult for the elderly to access enough food. With the Senior CSFP, the food bank distributes food to member agencies for direct distribution or travels to distribute pre-packaged boxes of food.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve 130,000 souls in need who are adults, children and families who are underemployed, unemployed, disabled, senior citizens, homeless, veterans, and people in recovery in our seventeen county service area located within the tri-state area of West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    West Virginia has many challenges with transportation as a barrier to access for those seeking emergency hunger relief. We began offering the option of proxies to allow designated folks to pick up food and program food boxes. As we have continued that, we have also identified opportunities for home deliveries to our most vulnerable populations and have a refrigerated van to assist with this service. Additionally, based on the level of chronic disease that prevails in our service area, we planned and instituted a Medically Indicated Food Box program to address End Stage Renal Disease as well as Chronic Disease such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has allowed us to make adjustments to our distribution schedules, the planning and implementation of our Mobile Pantry schedule, and to address cultural preferences of the foods we provide to the communities and popualtions we serve.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Facing Hunger Food Bank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Facing Hunger Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Maria Bronosky

Tennyson Thornberry

Walmart

Daniel Ware

Ware & Hall

Sarah Walling

Jenkins Fenstermaker

Cynthia Wiseman

AEP/Kentucky Power

Andrea Kely

Valley Health

Jeffrey Biederman

Morgan Stanley

Cynthia Dorsey

City Bank

David Jewell

William Health & Wellness

William Carpenter

Lincoln County Opportunity Center

Katheryn Hettlinger

Cabell Huntington Hospital

Velma Workman

OVP

Samuel Moore

Bishop

Wendi Adams

Kroger

Seth Young

Minister

Maggie Lane

Marshall University

Elijah Underwood

WSAZ

Natalie Ferrell

Huntington Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/8/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.