SILVER2021

YWCA Central Carolinas

Eliminating Racism, Empowering Women

aka Young Womens Christian Association Of The Central Carolinas Inc   |   Charlotte, NC   |  www.ywcacentralcarolinas.org

Mission

YWCA Central Carolinas is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all.

Ruling year info

1969

Chief Executive Officer

Kirsten D. Sikkelee

Main address

3420 Park Road

Charlotte, NC 28209 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Charlotte's YWCA

EIN

56-0532139

NTEE code info

YMCA, YWCA, YWHA, YMHA (P27)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In 2013 a Harvard University/UC Berkeley study reported the Charlotte-Mecklenburg community ranked 50th out of 50 in economic mobility among the largest U.S. cities. By focusing on education, financial stability and housing, YWCA Central Carolinas works with our community partners to provide comprehensive and coordinated services that improve the economic mobility of our participants and ensure they have the opportunity to reach their full potential. This year, the annual Point-In-Time homeless count revealed that at least 1,668 people remain homeless in Charlotte on any given day, an increase of 13% from last year. Many of these individuals fall under the umbrella of people we serve: 42% of those counted identified as female and 32% were part of a family with children. Families Together serves families of three or more people with at least one minor child and Women In Transition is recognized as the primary transitional housing program in the region for single women.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Women In Transition

Our Women In Transition (WIT) Program provides safe, affordable, transitional housing and intensive support services for single unaccompanied women who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. As part of the program, participants have access to services including: case management, computer instruction, career counseling, financial planning services, educational workshops, access to our fitness center and social activities. Our goal is to support our participants while they gain the skills and resources necessary to attain permanent housing upon exiting the program, adequate income and savings to sustain long-term housing and improve their sense of self-worth and well-being. In FY 2017/2018, 95% of our participants successfully eliminated at least one identified permanent housing barrier and 83% successfully moved into permanent housing upon exiting the program. Of our participants who were six or twelve months post-exit at the time of surveying, 100% remained permanently housed!

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Women and girls

Built in 2008, Families Together consists of 10 townhouses located on YWCA’s Park Road campus. Our program provides safe, affordable housing and intensive support services for homeless families with minor children. As part of the program, participants have access to services including: case management; computer instruction; career counseling; financial planning services, educational workshops, access to our Fitness Center and social activities. Each family can remain in the program for up to 18 months.

Families Together staff seek to create a safe, nurturing environment in which each family is encouraged to meet their needs constructively and to take responsibility to gain greater self-reliance. The goals of the program include permanent housing upon exiting the program, adequate income and savings to sustain permanent housing, strengthened family systems and improved sense of self-worth and being. In FY 2017/2018, 100% of our families successfully moved into permanent housing upon exiting our program.

Population(s) Served
Families

YWCA Central Carolinas has a long history of providing high-quality after school and summer programs for children in low-income areas at no cost to their families. Over 300 children in grades K – 5 in Mecklenburg and Union Counties attend our centers located in public housing communities, neighborhood recreation buildings and fragile neighborhoods. With our centers located where our children live, the transportation barrier to attend after school programs has been removed. Our goal is to provide each student with an exemplary academic experience filled with fun, personal growth and parent participation by utilizing the following core competencies:
Literacy Focus, Parent Engagement, and Character Development and Cultural Enrichment

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

YWCA Racial Justice Initiative is designed to inform the community through interactive forums about racial and social injustices that divide our community. Factual and fair information is presented by experts in the topic area being covered and participants have the opportunity to discuss issues and ask candid questions in a safe environment. YWCA Central Carolinas also participates in the YWCA-USA annual Stand Against Racism by offering community members to take a stand against racism at our even ont he Square in uptown Charlotte the last Friday of April.

Population(s) Served
Adults

At Charlotte’s YWCA, we have amazing on-site fitness facilities available to our members. Design a personal fitness program combining workouts in any of the intimate gyms and indoor pool or join one of the 50+ group exercise classes on our monthly schedule.

We have everything you need, no matter your fitness level. From yoga and cycling, to boot camps and aquatics classes. We boast knowledgeable and certified instructors, friendly staff and competitive rates.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

YWCA USA 1902

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In Families Together and Women In Transition programs, we help single women and families with minor children facing homelessness to break the cycle of poverty, overcome financial hardship and ultimately achieve the stability of permanent long-term housing. In our Youth programs, located in our community’s most under-resourced neighborhoods, we provide year-round after school and all day summer programming at no cost to low-income families. With a main focus on reading, our learning centers provide educational, social, behavioral and cultural support and resources for students and their parents/guardians. Our neighborhood-based program seeks to bring about systemic change in high-poverty neighborhoods by encouraging the potential we find in each of our students and empowering them to break the generational cycles of poverty. YWCA knows that stability starts with safe, decent affordable housing but families at risk of homelessness also need access to useful resources to help them become independent, break the cycle of poverty, overcome financial hardship and prepare their children to succeed in school.

The objective of YWCA's transitional housing program is to help individuals and families address the root causes of their homelessness and gain the skills, knowledge and resources necessary to obtain and maintain their own permanent housing. Participants are given the chance to stabilize their lives, recover from the chaos and stress of homelessness, assess their needs, recognize their barriers to permanent housing and develop a plan to improve their situations. YWCA’s Transitional Housing offers housing and comprehensive support services to participants with the goal leading to permanent housing. Pre-enrollment assessments determine ability and willingness to engage in a structured program. Participants and case managers meet weekly to develop plans, monitor progress and re-set goals. The maximum length of participation is 18 months, with the average being 14 months. In FY 2017/2018, 83% of our Women In Transition participants and 100% of our Families Together participants successfully moved into permanent housing upon exiting the program.

Our Youth Learning Centers located in low-income communities seek to bring about systemic change in high-poverty neighborhoods by building on the potential found in each child and empowering them to break generational cycles of poverty through a reading program called iReady. Youth Programs focus on safe spaces in at-risk communities where youth participate in an academic program designed to improve reading skills as the basis of academic success. Parent activities encourage engagement in their child’s education. Field trips, activities with community partners, corporate and university volunteers, homework assistance and healthy snacks add to a well-rounded program. YWCA participates in Read Charlotte's Data Collaborative and uses iReady Student Instruction. To measure progress throughout the year, we administer a beginning-of-the-year test to determine baseline, a mid-year test and an end-of-year test to measure progress. Based on iReady assessments during the 2017/2018 school year, 25% of our Mecklenburg students (K - 5th grade) tested at grade level at the beginning of the school year (fall 2017) versus 57% at the end of the school year (spring 2018) - more than a double percentage increase.

YWCA Central Carolinas is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all. YWCA provides safe spaces to stabilize lives, targeted educational opportunities and assistance in accessing community resources. Youth Programs serves 315 at-risk youth each day in high-poverty communities in our nine Youth Learning Centers. Our Transitional Housing Programs (Families Together and Women In Transition) provide homes and comprehensive case management for unaccompanied women and families with minor children who have experienced homelessness and desire to make necessary changes to move from instability to stable housing. Both programs operate year-round. Families Together (FT) serves 10 families each day and averages serving 70-80 individuals a year with variations caused by different family size and length of participation per family. Women In Transition (WIT) serves a maximum of 66 women every day and averages 120 participants per year based on individual plans and length of stays. YWCA Youth Programs provide academically based programming 50 out of 52 weeks a year in after-school and full days when school is out including 10 weeks of summer programming. YWCA programs that are not included in this funding request are our racial justice initiatives and our co-ed fitness center.

In 2017-18, 83% of Women In Transition participants successfully graduated the program into permanent housing; 95% established or maintained financial stability; and 100% of participants remained housed 6 and 12 months after exiting. In Families Together, 100% of families successfully transitioned into permanent housing, 100% of families that were six months and one year post-exit remained permanently housed; 100% of Families Together heads of household maintained or increased their income during their participation and 83% of heads of household reduced their eviction debt and/or increased their savings.

During the 2017-18 school year, 25% of our students read at grade level in the fall of 2017 compared to 54% in the spring 2018, a more than double percentage increase.

Financials

YWCA Central Carolinas
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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YWCA Central Carolinas

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Soamoya Rankins

Bank of America


Board co-chair

Shelley Smith

TIAA

Laurie Guy

Retired Nonprofit CEO

Jean Cochrane

Community Volunteer

Brittany Conner

Spencer Pettus Machine Co.

Sally Daley

Retired Nonprofit CEO

Christie Christie Gragnani-Woods

Bank of America

Andrea Jackson

Community Volunteer

Susan McConnell

The Duke Endowment

Amy Murphy

Moore & Van Allen

Whitney Simpson

Wake Forest

Angela Witt

Wells Fargo Advisors

Karen Zapata

Zapata Engineering

Patricia Zoder

Sockwell Partners

Shelley Smith

TIAA

Kristy Teskey

My Future NC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes