Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

Triangle Residential Options For Substance Abusers Inc

aka TROSA

Durham, NC

Mission

TROSA is an innovative, multi-year residential program that enables substance abusers to be productive, recovering individuals by providing comprehensive treatment, work-based vocational training, education, and continuing care.

Ruling Year

1994

Founder, President, and CEO

Mr. Kevin McDonald

Main Address

1820 James Street

Durham, NC 27707 USA

Keywords

Substance Abuse, Substance Abusers, TROSA, Drugs, Alcohol, Rehab, Treatment, Therapeutic Community, recovery, addicts, Kevin McDonald, Durham, NC, reentry, alternative to prison, incarceration

EIN

56-1861158

 Number

2558890982

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

The U.S. Surgeon General released a landmark report in 2016 declaring substance use disorders to be the most pressing health crisis of our time. Between 2002 and 2015, there was a 6.2-fold increase nationally in heroin overdose deaths and a 2.8-fold increase in overdose deaths from all opioids, including prescription medications.

Of the over 20 million Americans who suffer from substance use disorders and are in need of recovery services, less than 11% will receive the care they need. Multiply this by the families and friends also suffering from their loved ones' addictions, and the numbers of those affected by substance abuse are staggering.

TROSA serves a vulnerable population. TROSA's residents have typically struggled with chronic addiction for more than 10 years and need more intensive, long-term treatment. In addition, TROSA's residents often do not have the financial resources to pay for treatment, and TROSA alleviates this by providing services at no charge.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of participants counseled

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Number of clients served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Percent of participants who report no criminal convictions one year after program completion

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Number of service days in one year

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Number of clients participating in educational programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Total number of clients without a high school diploma or GED

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Number of people trained

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Average number of community treatment days per inpatient

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Total number of clients without health insurance and without Medicaid

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Percent of participants reporting no relapse 12 months post program

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Number of participants formerly incarcerated

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Percent of participants reporting no relapse 12 months post program

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Long-term Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

TROSA is an innovative, multi-year residential program that enables substance abusers to be productive, recovering individuals by providing comprehensive treatment, work-based vocational training, education, and continuing care. TROSA is the largest licensed residential substance abuse treatment center in North Carolina. As a multi-year residential program, TROSA helps individuals recover from chronic substance use disorder by offering services at no cost including: basic needs - food, clothing, and housing; counseling; medical care; vocational training; leadership training; education; and continuing care. We provide these services to an average of 500 residents daily.

TROSA's primary purpose is to help individuals struggling with chronic substance use disorders maintain their sobriety, and we do this through a unique treatment model. Rather than focusing solely on the sobriety of our residents, TROSA focuses on treating the "whole person" - which includes the development of skills, education, and training. Employment is one of the best predictors of successful substance abuse treatment; The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration identifies "purpose," such as employment, as a major factor supporting recovery. Research shows the more education and training individuals attain, the more successful they will be at maintaining stable employment – allowing them to return to their families and communities and to maintain recovery.

TROSA's residents typically have multiple barriers to employment that prevent them from acquiring jobs in different industries and fields. In order to overcome these barriers, TROSA provides residents with 40 hours of vocational training per week and scholarships to advance their education through classes at a local college or university. By offering residents marketable job skills, education, and experience, they will be better equipped to maintain long-term sobriety and become healthier, fully engaged, and contributing members of the community.

TROSA's long-term plan is to continue serving as a highly-regarded non-profit recovery program that continually self-evaluates and innovates to provide the best care for a growing number of individuals seeking effective substance abuse recovery programs. Since our founding, we have continued to improve our programming while aligning with best practices. We have added more specialized programs such as therapies for women and individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as continuing care services for graduates, including: relapse prevention groups; transportation to/from work or school; and safe, sober, affordable housing.

TROSA's comprehensive treatment services help people struggling with substance abuse get on the path to recovery, rebuild their lives, and reconnect with their families and communities. TROSA's residents advance through the stages of treatment by accomplishing clearly delineated milestones. Earlier program phases are designed to foster a connection with program staff and peers and to minimize negative self-images, while later phases stress the importance of independent decision-making and responsibility.

At TROSA, we believe that the best prevention and treatment systems must address the underlying problems. Our treatment model is a modified Therapeutic Community, a drug-free residential setting. The community relies on its members – both treatment staff and those in the program – as key agents of change. These change agents influence individual attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors associated with drug use. We use a range of Evidence-Based Therapies (EBTs) to help residents recognize, understand, and overcome their dysfunctional thought patterns and behaviors. Our motto, “Each One, Teach One," reflects the importance of peer support in our program and the community's vital role in achieving and maintaining recovery.

For over 20 years, TROSA has accepted residents with co-occurring mental illnesses, employing full-time licensed mental health counselors on-site and a partnership with Duke's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences to meet specific mental health needs of residents, such as therapies for women and individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Vocational training is the foundation of our program. Many residents have limited work histories, but through its vocational opportunities, TROSA helps residents gain on-the-job training and a strong work ethic, as well as a wide variety of marketable job skills.

Education is another key component of our program. After six months in the program, residents without a high school diploma or GED begin taking a GED class. After one year, residents who have attained their high school diploma or GED are eligible to take one class at Durham Technical Community College. After 21 months at TROSA, eligible residents can apply to TROSA's Scholars Program, which provides residents an opportunity to further their education while continuing to receive comprehensive treatment services at no charge.

As residents prepare to graduate, interview and job skills classes prepare them to find employment and succeed in the workplace. TROSA also offers instruction in topics such as personal finance and navigating healthcare systems. Our Continuing Care services help program graduates stay sober, employed, and crime-free as they transition into the community. Each month, more than 75 graduates benefit from these services, including transportation to and from work; access to safe, sober, low-cost housing; and bi-weekly support groups that focus on relapse prevention.

Kevin McDonald founded TROSA in 1994 and currently serves as President and CEO. TROSA's daily operations are managed by Keith Artin, Chief Operating Officer, who has worked with TROSA since 2001; Karen Kelley, Chief Program Officer, who oversees Counseling, Medical, Intake, Continuing Care, and Education, and has been with TROSA for over 15 years; Kim Chambers, Chief Financial Officer since 2011; and Kristen Rosselli, Chief Strategy Officer, who has been with TROSA since 2012. In addition, our Men's and Women's Programs are led by Jesse Battle and Sandie Alger, respectively, who together have more than 30 years of experience serving TROSA and its residents.

TROSA has nearly 20 different departments to run its operations, programming, social enterprises, and resident life. TROSA currently has about 70 full-time staff members, and over 70% are graduates of TROSA's program or a similar program. These staff members are uniquely qualified because they come from a similar background and have gone through this very program or a similar program. Staff members who are program graduates can show residents that success is attainable, as they now have stable employment, are sober, and are living successful lives.

Additionally, through TROSA's operations and social enterprises, residents are trained in various positions, creating a therapeutic sense of community and shared responsibility for individual and group successes. Residents provide support to many of TROSA's departments – such as finance, medical, administration, and kitchen services – which helps residents to develop a strong work ethic and a wide variety of marketable job skills that help secure full-time employment upon leaving TROSA.

TROSA documents all services provided to our residents. Our program staff members assess each resident's progress through ongoing observation, counseling, and motivational interviews. As a Therapeutic Community, TROSA relies on every member of the community – both treatment staff and those in the program – to evaluate one another on an ongoing basis and provide constructive feedback and peer counseling.

Observations and data for each resident are collected in TROSA's internal client database, Fresh Start, which tracks each client's progress in detail over the course of the multi-year program. We maintain detailed records on each of our clients, including, among other things: length of stay, vocational training assignments, educational classes, and group sessions attended. These records afford us the ability to document services provided to all residents at TROSA.

TROSA also maintains records of residents nearing completion of the program and tracks services offered to these residents. We conduct exit and follow-up interviews with graduates for one year after they complete treatment. This allows us to gather information and feedback on a wide range of metrics, from employment status to sobriety to involvement with the criminal justice system.

While TROSA helps individuals achieve self-sufficiency, it also has a profound impact on the community. Each dollar invested in TROSA produces considerable benefits to the community, as residents returning home after graduating do so sober and employed. An independent study conducted by RTI International found that TROSA saves the state of North Carolina $7.5 million dollars per year (conservative estimate) in criminal justice and emergency care costs. In addition, the National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that every $1 invested in substance abuse treatment yields a return of $4 to $7 in reduced drug-related crime, criminal justice costs, and theft. When including savings related to healthcare, total savings can exceed costs by a ratio of 12 to 1.

We will continue to work on improving the level of service we provide to all who come to TROSA, and historically have been open to evolution and change in the pursuit of doing better.

External Reviews

Photos

Financials

Triangle Residential Options For Substance Abusers Inc

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No