CHRISTIAN FRIENDS OF KOREA INC

aka CFK   |   Black Mountain, NC   |  www.cfk.org

Mission

Christian Friends of Korea seeks to bring hope and healing in the name of Christ, by sending humanitarian aid in the form of food, medicine, agricultural supplies, bedding and blankets, medical equipment and supplies, and other needed goods to hospitals and other facilities in North Korea, regularly confirming delivery and distribution of all goods sent.

Ruling year info

1996

Principal Officer

Mrs. Heidi Linton

Main address

P O Box 936

Black Mountain, NC 28711 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-1923972

NTEE code info

Christian (X20)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The problem we are seeking to address is that of the health of North Korean hepatitis, pediatric, and tuberculosis patients. We do so by providing holistic services to address health needs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

DPRK National TB Reference Laboratory

North Korea suffers from high burdens of tuberculosis, multi-drug tuberculosis (MDR-TB), and hepatitis. CFK provides assistance to approximately 30 TB or hepatitis specialty care centers to help these places provide better care for their patients. Our assistance includes: arranging for well drilling to take place to ensure a protected supply of clean, abundant water; installing solar/gravity water distribution systems at care center; assisting with renovations of care centers (new roofing, windows/doors); supplying greenhouses and small tractors to increase local capacity for food production; supporting ongoing shipments of high protein nutritional supplements, general medicines and blankets to help patients during their recovery period; and capacity-building on the central/national level through the development of the National TB Reference Laboratory, and ongoing training to build technical capacity.

In 2015, we also started a pilot 10-year Hepatitis B treatment program that will include building local diagnostic capabilities, education and training, and introduction of antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B sufferers.

CFK programs directly serve ordinary North Koreans who are suffering from TB, MDR-TB, and/or hepatitis B, and the staff who are caring for them. CFK teams visit the DPRK at least 4 times/year, confirming the arrival/delivery/use of shipments at local care centers, working side by side with local partners to complete technical projects, and building trust and relationships along the way. Program success is measured regularly through interviews with local officials, facility staff and patients, and by direct observation at local facilities. We regularly bring major donor representatives/partners with us on visits to DPRK so they can directly observe for themselves the outcome of projects/engagement.

Population(s) Served

Provision of Hepatitis medication for patients in North Korea

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) 1999

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals to whom medicines were distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

DPRK National TB Reference Laboratory

Context Notes

This metric includes includes medication for tuberculosis and hepatitis patients living in rest homes and hospitals. Prescription medicines are provides as well as over-the-counter medicines.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Christian Friends of Korea is to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ in North Korea by means of educational, humanitarian, and religious projects and exchanges, and to promote genuine peace and reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula and throughout the Pacific Rim. Our organization aims to respond to the needs of pediatric/TB/hepatitis patients in North Korea by providing food, permanent clean water solutions, greenhouses, transportation for care centers, medicine, and construction materials for renovations. We currently provide this aid to about 30 care facilities and hospitals. In addition to providing this aid, we make regular confirming visits to ensure the aid is actively being used for its intended purposes. Additionally, we partner with Stanford University and other technical experts to provide ongoing training at the National TB Reference Lab towards the goals of accurate diagnostics and international accreditation. Our goals within the next three to five years include support toward accreditation of the National TB Reference Lab; delivery of high level medical and other technical training workshops at the CFK-constructed Training Center located next to the National TB Reference Lab for lab and medical professionals, expand the new medical library, enhance local food security through expansion of our greenhouse program, complete full clean-water distribution systems at more of our supported facilities, expand solar lighting capabilities for the provision of interior lighting to care centers, to fully develop the new hepatitis B pilot project to improve the lives of chronic hepatitis B patients, and other projects. In all of this, we work to build relationships and trust, and to live out genuine Christian witness through deed and word in DPRK.

Our goal is to create self-sustaining care facilities. The needs of each facility vary, but generally, CFK provides assistance in four main areas of health necessities: clean water, agriculture, facility upgrades, and medical supplies/training.
Water projects: Needs vary by location but generally include: drilling water wells, installing tanks, solar panels, and a gravity-fed water system. Installing water systems helps protect the water supply to multiple points of use at the facility, it saves a tremendous amount of staff time that was previously engaged in collecting water, and it greatly improve agricultural irrigation capability.
Construction projects: With the sharply rising numbers of registered TB patients, care facilities must expand in order to house and care for sick and often contagious patients. Local staff can generally build the buildings themselves, but they need help with finish materials, such as windows and doors, roofing materials, basic electrical wiring and fixtures, tile, etc. Other facilities have 30-50 year old roofs that need to be replaced; or windows that have large gaps, making it very difficult to heat the rooms in the cold of winter. After receiving specific plans from care facilities, we raise donor funds and use them to purchase and deliver supplies to specific care centers to help them complete planned renovation projects.
Greenhouses: Greenhouses have proven to be extremely successful in supplying fresh vegetables year round and in greatly enhancing local food security for health care facilities. Most greenhouses produce 2-3 metric tons of food every year – usually producing at least 3 crops in any given year. Most importantly, they are able to produce fresh greens from November – March, when it is too cold to grow anything outside, providing critical vitamins and fresh food that would not be available otherwise.
Tractors and motorized tricycles: Cargo motorcycles provide an efficient and practical means for local rest homes to carry goods and patients longer distances on poor roads while keeping them protected from the weather. Tractor sets, including a tractor, trailer, tiller, plow, and irrigation pump, are used by rural facilities 5-8 hours/day year round, and generally last 5-6 years (being rebuilt/refurbished every year) before needing replacement.
Seeds: High quality vegetable seeds improve greenhouse and field production of fresh vegetables and greens to enhance nutrition for malnourished patients.
Doctor's Training/Supplies: CFK's Doctors Kits are in high demand and greatly appreciated by North Korean doctors. They give the basic tools needed for medical personnel to carry out their vital work. A new medical training center was completed in May, 2014, next to the NTRL with expanded classroom space and a medical library. This space allows training workshops to be open to larger groups of Lab and medical professionals.

Christian Friends of Korea has been actively working in North Korea since 1995. Our initial work responded to the devastating floods of 1995 that led to a protracted famine that killed between 250,000 and 1.6 million people. In 1998, we transitioned to providing assistance to combat a growing tuberculosis epidemic that had its roots in the famine. Care centers have been challenged over the past two decades to provide even the most basic care for patients – food/shelter/water/medicine.We have tried to address these needs on both an emergency humanitarian level, and to build capacity and change for the long term. Our work is focused at about 30 pediatric, TB and hepatitis facilities throughout the provinces of North and South Hwanghae, Kaesong City and parts of Pyongyang. In 2014, these facilities cared for over 14,000 TB and hepatitis patients (long term care), over 40,000 pediatric patients (short term care), provided by more than 1,470 care center staff members.

Our organization has grown from a support staff of one person and a budget of $2.1 million in 2002 to three full-time and one part-time staff members and a budget of $11.5 million in 2013. These staff members coordinate the activities and leverage the resources of longstanding partners, donors, foundations, board members, and scores of volunteers bringing a wide range of skills and perspectives to the organization. The strength of CFK is found in our faith, and in the many highly skilled technical and other volunteers who participate regularly on CFK visits to DPRK, donating their time and expertise, and generally paying their own travel costs. Our volunteers heavily invest themselves to further Christian engagement and witness in North Korea by lending expertise, time, talents, and financial resources to develop greenhouse and clean water initiatives, construction projects, lab/medical training and relief efforts, while serving as members of the living Body of Christ. CFK volunteers have skills/training ranging from construction trades (plumbing, carpentry, electrical, etc.), to agricultural specialties, to advanced and highly technical medical/diagnostic specialties.

We partner with numerous nonprofit organizations, foundations, and churches as we pursue this work. We also partner with the Ministry of Public Health in North Korea. Stanford University Medical School has collaborated with us since 2008 in the establishment of ongoing training at the National TB Reference Lab.

CFK currently assists about 30 pediatric, tuberculosis, and hepatitis hospitals and care centers toward the goal that each facility will eventually become a self-sustaining care community. We have successfully provided greenhouses to all facilities, completed thirteen clean water system installations, successfully drilled seventeen deep water wells (with handpumps), and completed six operating theater renovation projects. Meanwhile, we continue to send ongoing shipments of canned meat and other nutritional supplements, general medicines, blankets and hygiene kits, warm clothing, patient mats and bedding, and other items to assist care centers to provide better care and nutrition to recovering patients. We have fully renovated the National Tuberculosis Reference Laborartory (NRL) and have been facilitating ongoing medical/lab training in partnership with Stanford University School of Medicine since 2008. A new medical training center was completed and the first training workshop was held in May 2014. We have provided renovation materials (including, as needed: windows, doors, roofing materials and tile) to 17 care centers and the National Lab, and also delivered 10 new cargo motorcycles, 11 new tractor sets, and 17 motorcycles. Also in 2014, 14 solar-powered lighting systems were delivered to facilities, and 27 sets of tractor tires/repair kits were delivered. As of 2015, CFK has delivered 28 solar-powered lighting systems and spare parts for cargo motorcycles and tractors, replacement plastic for 33 greenhouses, and 580 patient mat sets (4 mats per set), and provided 28 hand-cranked hospital bed sets (including: a mattress and pillow, pillow cases, and sheets). In 2014/15, eleven care centers received over $300,000 in new roofing, windows/doors, tile and other basic construction supplies to complete renovations at each location that have greatly improved patient housing.
While all of these projects are making a real difference and bringing positive change to many communities in the DPRK, the needs are simply overwhelming. The TB epidemic continues to grow in DPRK – in part because it is a highly communicable disease and basic living conditions for many people have not changed significantly. While the intense food shortages have eased, a recent (2014) UN report indicates that an estimated 70% of North Koreans are chronically food insecure. Malnutrition rates are still very high in the country, compromising people's immune systems and making them much more vulnerable to infection. While all our efforts are helping, and things are clearly changing in a positive direction in the places where we are working, there is not yet enough critical mass of change country-wide to start to bring infection rates down. The Global Fund to fight TB/AIDS/Malaria is providing some support the DPRK national TB program through UNICEF/WHO, but even those resources are not enough.

Financials

CHRISTIAN FRIENDS OF KOREA INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHRISTIAN FRIENDS OF KOREA INC

Board of directors
as of 04/29/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Rob Robinson

No Affiliation

Fred Moore

No Affiliation

John Akers

No Affiliation

Kay Rader

No Affiliation

Liana Wolfe

No Affiliation

Sissel Topple

No Affiliation

Steve Aceto

No Affiliation

Bill Moore

No Affiliation

Rick Armstrong

No Affiliation

Yeri Im

No Affiliation

Thomas Linton

No Affiliation

John Crane

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No