Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Carolinas

Changing Perspectives. Changing Lives. Our Commitment is to Empower Potential!

aka BBBSCC   |   Charlotte, NC   |  https://bbbscentralcarolinas.org/

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Carolinas is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported, one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.

Ruling year info

2001

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Donna Y. Dunlap

Main address

3801 East Independence Blvd

Charlotte, NC 28205 USA

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EIN

56-2264009

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Founded in 1972, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Carolinas has operated under the belief that inherent in every child is the ability to succeed and thrive in life. We currently serve more than 1,500 children each year in Mecklenburg, Cabarrus and York counties. By partnering with parents/guardians, volunteers, and others in the community, we are accountable for each child in our program achieving: Higher aspirations, greater confidence, and better relationships Educational Success Big Brothers Big Sisters effectively improves the lives of youth and deeply engages communities through involvement with families, mentors, community funders, schools and other partners. Our proven methodology for serving children through one-to-one mentoring relationships produces measurable positive outcomes in the areas of: Educational success Avoidance of risky behaviors Socio-economic competence

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Traditional Mentoring

Community-Based
Allows the Big and Little to meet at their convenience, typically on weekends or after school. This continues to be our largest group of mentoring relationships.

School-Based
Where Bigs have limited flexibility, or Littles specifically desire school help, this structure requires Bigs and Littles to meet at school during the lunch hour.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Board of the Year 2019

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

National Quality Award 2019

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

National Quality Award 2018

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

NonProfit of the Year 2019

Cabarrus Regional Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Member of MENTOR 2021

Safe Space Partner 2019

YearUp Partner 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have the ability to seek help from and respond appropriately to adults

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Traditional Mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of participants who do not become involved in the juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Traditional Mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Participants that avoided the juvenile justice system

Number of high school seniors who graduate from high school on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Traditional Mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number relates tp percentages

Number of high school graduates who are persisting in college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Traditional Mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

* Number relates to percentages

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Traditional Mentoring

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Information covers Mecklenburg County, Cabarrus County in North Carolina and York County in South Carolina

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Traditional Mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

SOCIAL COMPETENCY & SOCIAL ACCEPTANCE 92% maintain or improve relationships, conduct, and self-confidence

Number of students with good social and leadership skills and self-discipline

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Traditional Mentoring

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

EDUCATION ASPIRATIONS: Maintained or improved educational expectations

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Carolinas aims to create mentoring relationships that empower youth to reach their full potential. Our programs are designed to help youth increase their self-esteem, excel in school, improve relationships with parents, avoid risky behaviors (such as smoking and drinking), and avoid involvement in the juvenile justice system.

Our mission inherently focuses on a collaborative approach that convenes community stakeholders that include thought-partners across race, gender, and generations to resolve historical and contemporary barriers to access and opportunities. Our programs create an ecosystem of change; hence we continuously "defend potential."

BBBSCC is committed to working toward more just, diverse, equal, and inclusive opportunities, that support the needs of the youth that we serve. To that end, the organization is committed to excellence, consistently measuring program impact and creating strategies that support our aims.
We use programmatic results to inform and strengthen future programming and operations by annually reviewing data and reinterpreting it to ensure that programs respond to current needs and trends.

BBBSCC works to establish communications channels, mutual understanding, and goals that actively promote holistic offerings that meet the needs of those we serve. The organization is also aware that community input is imperative as it supports the alignment of respective objectives, assets and maximizes collective impact on social justice and racial equity.

This is why our staff's structure and dedicated Board of Directors reflect a microcosm of diversity in the areas in which we serve. Our team and Board of Directors are culturally competent leaders who understand our community's rich and complex history and make fair and just decisions that act with an equity lens.

Since 1972, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Carolinas has been matching youth in one-to-one mentoring relationships with volunteers and supporting those relationships to make sure youth are on a path to reaching their full potential.

In the future our aim is to continue to be the gold standard of youth mentoring and to continually improve our data, our programs, and our outcomes. We also aim to strengthen and build our capacity to serve more youth and creating a strong foundation through generous supporters to remain sustainable.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    BBBSCC serves mainly low-opportunity youth primarily attending Title-I schools with single-parents. 70% of households earn less than $25,000 a year, and 90% are minority (67% identify as African American and 49% identify as male). Many that we serve live in the zip codes identified as Lower-Opportunity Neighborhoods. We specifically assist with their health and education and support their access to higher education.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have successfully pivoted to a safe and genuine engagement model between our Littles and Bigs during the global Covid-19 pandemic. We aim to maintain connections while ensuring safe physical distancing. We are determined not to have a pandemic cause a social or emotional disconnection among our matches.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The organization develops successful relationships with key stakeholders to share knowledge, resources, influence policy, reduce redundancy, and improve programs and operations. We seek feedback achieve our goals, increase impact, and/or strengthen connections with constituents and others in the communities we serve. Feedback has allowed us to stay abreast of trends and changes in the field by openly communicating to gather and share information on lessons learned and best practices to promote overall accountability.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Carolinas
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Carolinas

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Donna Julian, Board Chair

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/16/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/04/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.