Child Abuse Prevention Association

aka CAPA   |   Beaufort, SC   |  www.capabeaufort.org

Mission

CAPA exists to break the destructive cycle of child abuse and neglect by equipping parents, children and their caregivers with necessary skills, knowledge, and values.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Mrs. Christina Wilson

Main address

Post Office Box 531

Beaufort, SC 29901 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

57-0722206

NTEE code info

Child Abuse, Prevention of (I72)

Group Home (Long Term (P73)

Foster Care (P32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Children continue to be abused and neglected. Some families do not have the resources or support they need to prevent their children from being removed. South Carolina has a critical shortage of suitable foster beds for children removed from their caregivers. 1. Children, and adults that work with them, need to know how to recognize child abuse/neglect and where to report cases. 2. In addition to our Open Arms Children's Home, CAPA needs to recruit, train, and license new foster homes to meet the need. 3. Families need training and support to prevent children from being removed from their homes and to prepare them for the children to return home.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Open Arms Children's Home

CAPA's Open Arms Children's Home serves children from birth to 21 who have been removed from their parents or caregivers due to allegations of abuse and/or neglect.  We have served over 2,300 children since 1985. Our residential home is a 4,600 sqft, 15-bed facility staffed 24 hours a day. We provided case management, clothing, family-style meals, school tutoring, encouragement, and love. In 2021, Open Arms provided 3,779 days of care to 33 child victims.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Erin's Law requires all public schools to implement a prevention-oriented child sexual abuse program. CAPA's program for Pre-K through middle school is offered at no charge to the school district. Our highly trained staff uses age-appropriate videos, books, and role-playing activities to explain the difficult and uncomfortable subject matter. Take-home materials are available in English and Spanish for further discussion between parent and child. After CAPA lessons, children are able to recognize the three kinds of touch and the three safety step strategies. They are able to respond to unsafe and confusing situations reducing their risk of sexual abuse, physical abuse, and sexual assault. Children are empowered to report any abuse to a safe adult and taught to keep telling until an adult listens.

Population(s) Served
Children

Our Parent Support programs include the evidenced-based Exchange Parent Aide home-visitation program, Safe Sleep education, and Triple P parenting classes. Parent Aides are trained, professionally supervised individuals (paid and volunteer) who provide supportive and educational, in-home services to families at-risk of child abuse and neglect for up to 13 months. CAPA is a Cribs for Kids National Safe Sleep Initiative partner providing a uniform safe sleep message with the intervention of a crib if needed. Our program includes information on SIDS/SUID, identifying risk factors, and the ABCs of Safe Sleep (Alone, on the Back, in a Crib). CAPA also provides weekly parent education classes at our outreach center in Port Royal, utilizing the Triple P curriculum. Additionally, we have bi-monthly parenting classes at the Beaufort County Detention Center.

Population(s) Served
Parents

South Carolina has a critical shortage of foster beds for children removed from their homes due to allegations of child abuse and/or neglect. As a licensed Child Placing Agency, CAPA recruits, orientates, licenses, and trains Resource Families. In 2021, we received 1,764 placement requests for victims of child abuse or neglect; our families provided care for 49.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Foster and adoptive parents

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2008

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2012

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2016

National Exchange Club Foundation AAA Accreditation 2017

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2020

National Exchange Club Foundation AAA Accreditation 2021

Affiliations & memberships

Prevent Child Abuse America - Member 2013

United Way Member Agency 2013

Children's Trust of South Carolina 2000

Palmetto Association of Children and Families (PAFCAF) 2000

National Exchange Club Affiliate CAPA Center 2012

Together SC 2014

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of licensed foster families as a result of the organization's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Foster and adoptive children, Foster and adoptive parents

Related Program

Resource Family Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children in foster care who have stable placements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Resource Family Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Open Arms Children's Home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed coping skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

School-based prevention programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Stop child abuse.  CAPA will commit to educating children, families, and their communities to recognize and prevent child abuse and neglect in order to create safe environments.CAPA will embrace children and families from hard places through a diverse portfolio of in-home support, victim services, and out of home placement options.CAPA will promote awareness and our role in the community in breaking the cycle of child abuse and neglect.CAPA will collaborate with community stakeholders to influence attitudes, behaviors, and policies to prevent child abuse and neglect and deliver trauma-informed care. CAPA will practice a robust quality improvement process, employ sound organizational policies and procedures, and balance stability and growth.

Encourage and support community partners in the implementation of trauma-informed, evidence-based practices.

Embrace a culture of trauma-informed practices to ensure whole-person well-being. Continually assess and provide appropriate services and referrals.

Advocate for healthy transitions and supportive follow up care.

Create a focused marketing strategy for the agency and its programs. 

Develop informed relationships with, and influence, community decision-makers. Increase internal knowledge of pending legislation and public policy.

Raise public knowledge of issues around children and families from hard places. 

Cultivate and nurture relationships with donors, volunteers, and organizations to create stable revenue and human resource streams.

Evaluate programs, staff, policies, and procedures for continued quality improvement.

With over 30 years of experience working with children and families, CAPA has built solid partnerships with state and local agencies including the Department of Social Services and the Beaufort County School District.  We also have long-standing relationships with the community, solid partnerships other agencies, a dedicated volunteer pool, and a thriving Thrift Store. We use only best-practice, science-based curricula with quarterly and annual performance quality reviews and maintain accreditation with the Council on Accreditation.

From our humble beginnings, CAPA has learned much about the rehabilitation of children, parents, and families. Previously, the child welfare system operated by removing a child from an unsafe situation, giving parents a checklist of items to accomplish, and then, once the list was done, returning the child to the home. For our role in this system, we spent days or even months loving and healing a child for them to be returned to often the same environment. Today, the system understands the need to not only heal the child but that the healing of the parent and the family is critical to their success. Research has proven that most of the parents committing child abuse or neglect were subjected to adverse childhood experiences of their own, making it virtually impossible for these parents to be effective unless and until their own healing was complete. CAPA has realigned our strategic emphasis to view the family as a complete unit and to focus on the connected and attuned relationships that must exist between its members. Today, we are expanding our focus to try to help all caregivers of children from hard places understand that behavior is often not a choice and that what happened to them has a lasting impact on who they are.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve children and the adults who care for them.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Clients in our Triple P parenting classes are assessed at enrollment using the Adult Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI-2) and Adverse Childhood Experiences test (ACE). Even though the parents received their scores, they weren't translating the numbers into problem behaviors or attitudes. After feedback from facilitators and clients, the Director of Programs now meets with the client prior to the first class to review the scores and identify areas for growth.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Child Abuse Prevention Association
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Child Abuse Prevention Association

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Reece Bertholf

City of Beaufort

Term: 2021 - 2022

Stacey Canaday

Law Firm of Tupper, Grimsley, Dean & Canaday, PA,

Kim Duke-Clark

May River Pet Resort

Jonathan Gray

Graybar Fence Company

Bernie Kole

retired

Nan Brown-Sutton

Lulu Burgess

Brooke Dean

Clinical Psychologist

Jesse Gavigan

Marine Corps Community Services

Gertie Washington

Gertie Washington, LPC

Reece Bertholf

City of Beaufort/Port Royal Fire Department

Darlene Douglas

retired

Bob Bible

Atlantic Marine Corps Communities at Tri-Command

Doug Massalon

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/26/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.