WINGS for Kids

helping kids soar

aka WINGS   |   Charleston, SC   |  http://www.wingsforkids.org

Mission

Our mission is to equip at-risk kids with the social emotional skills to succeed in school, stay in school and thrive in life.

Ruling year info

1996

CEO

Ms. Bridget Durkan Laird

Main address

476 Meeting Street Suite E

Charleston, SC 29403 USA

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EIN

57-1055054

NTEE code info

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

WINGS after school program

WINGS Afterschool is an education program that teaches kids how to behave well, make good decisions, and build healthy relationships. We do this by weaving a comprehensive social emotional learning curriculum into a fresh and fun afterschool program. Kids get the life lessons they need to succeed and be happy, and they get a safe place to call home after school.


We operate afterschool programs in Title I elementary schools. Kids are referred to the program by principals and teachers based on their struggles in school or at home. The program operates at the school site and kids attend three hours per day, five days a week during the school year. There is no cost to attend the program, but full time attendance is required. Kids receive an afterschool snack, help with their homework, dinner, and bus transportation home.


Sequential learning objectives are taught throughout the school year to provide an opportunity to develop the five core competencies of SEL (self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, responsible decision-making and relationship skills) through practice, reflection, and positive reinforcement. Kids learn about themselves and others through group activities and discussions while developing the capacity for empathy and respect.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Theory of Change states:

When kids get WINGS for just two years:
• They develop strong social and emotional skills
• They improve behavior and school attendance in elementary school
• They have better behavior and school attachment in middle school
• They graduate from high school and avoid teenage pregnancy and jail

When our college-aged staff serve as WINGSLeaders for a year or more:
• They strengthen their own social and emotional skills
• They gain success professionally as educators, youth leaders, and business leaders
• They gain success personally as partners, parents, and youth mentors.

WINGS is the only U.S. organization focused solely on developing and improving social and emotional skills within after school programming. We see the hours after school as a tremendous opportunity to fortify our kids with the skills they need to stay in school and stay out of trouble. We provide direct service to low-income, at risk elementary school kids and their families.

The core WINGS program runs 3-hours per day, 5-days per week (not on a drop-in basis) and students receive more than 500 hours of direct programming per year. Using our research-based curriculum, we incorporate 30 learning objectives and the WINGS Creed (which is recited by staff and kids daily) into every activity we teach in order to develop the five core competencies of social and emotional learning (SEL): self-awareness, relationship skills, social awareness, self-management, and responsible decision making skills.

Our organization offers a number of relative advantages over other education and after school programs. We use a codified, research-based curriculum that requires we enter data on a daily basis to track our kids' progress and to ensure we are able to deliver on our documented outcomes--that we are proving our effectiveness at increasing social and emotional skills, behavior, attendance, and academic performance.

Organizationally, we have a documented history of financial solvency, strong leadership, an active Board of Directors, and the WINGS program offers high compatibility and support from our clients and customers. We've experienced a high level of parental involvement during our first year in Atlanta and have taken advantage of the opportunity to enhance our parent component to meet this new demand. Parents are highly supportive of programs that improve the well-being of their kids, and kids want to return day after day to WINGS. Even if the social and emotional learning (SEL) components of WINGS were removed, the high-quality, free childcare being provided is valued by our families. By proving positive effects on attendance and academics, we are aligned with the organizational objectives of school districts and we continue to receive district support year after year.

WINGS kid continue to demonstrate lower rates of chronic absenteeism compared to their counterparts. Around 9%* of kids in the WINGS Programs are chronically absent compared to the national average, 13.4%**, of the same population (African-American, Elementary students). There are Regions that WINGS serves whose kids attending the WINGS Programs have chronic absenteeism rates around 5-6%*.

· External evaluations show WINGS kids have greater executive function skills, applied problem solving skills, better classroom behavior, improved school attendance, reported higher self-esteem and less anxiety than non-WINGS students. Increases in these areas are predictors for positive long-term outcomes, such as improved academic achievement, positive high-school graduation rates, and reduced rates of criminal behavior.

Both executive function skills improved and applied problem solving skills improved for WINGS students. Increases in these areas are predictors for positive long-term outcomes, such as improved academic achievement, positive high-school graduation rates, higher income, and reduced rates of criminal behavior.

Positive external evaluation results led to a four-year, $2.8 million impact study or randomized control trial (RCT) study - the gold standard in program evaluation. The RCT will not be finalized until 2017, but there are positive trends emerging:

· WINGS kids received higher ratings from their teachers across all SEL competencies

· WINGS kids were rated as having better classroom relationships and behaviors by their teachers

· WINGS kids performed better on a measure of executive functions

*2015-2016 school attendance data provided by school districts affiliated with the WINGS for kids Programs.

** Chronic Absenteeism in The Nation's Schools. (2016, 9/30). Retrieved from https://www2.ed.gov/datastory/chronicabsenteeism.html.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    WINGS serves elementary-aged students who attend Title 1 schools, and their families. Approximately 98% of the students are African American or Hispanic/Latino and live 150% below the federal poverty level. Students reside in urban and rural areas in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Sample student surveys are completed throughout the year during program site visits, and formal student surveys are completed at the end of the year from all students. In addition to asking questions about the climate/culture of the WINGS program, relationship with WINGS Leaders (aka mentors), and the lessons they have been learning, WINGS inquires about their interests in enrichment programming. In one of our regions, there was an overwhelming number of students across program sites who wanted more enrichments involving cooking and food nutrition. As a result, WINGS sought specific grants to support this enrichment to buy supplies, partner with local cooks and chefs, host cooking competitions, develop cookbooks, and build in math facts into each of the lessons.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback lies at the core of how WINGS operates and who we are. In an effort to continually strive for greater outcomes for our families and students, we know that listening, learning, and changing is a must. These efforts create a true partnership with the families and students we serve as we collaborate together in shared goals.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

WINGS for Kids
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WINGS for Kids

Board of directors
as of 06/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. David Morley

Judith Ranger Smith

Marc Brackett

Pat Ilderton

Becky Marson

Steve Parker, Jr.

John Roberts

Mike Tollin

Deborah Kennard

Suzan Zoukis

Lucy Weathers

Arthur Rosen

Toya Hampton

Steve Ward

Allie Simmons

Wenda Millard

Sh'Kur Francis

Carole Rawle

Nicole St. Pierre

Rebecca Ufkes

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/13/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.