Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Heart of Georgia, Inc.

Macon, GA   |  http://www.bbbsheartga.org

Mission

The mission of the agency is to create and support one to one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.

Ruling year info

1971

President/CEO

Ms. Betsy Fitzgerald

Main address

PO Box 7362

Macon, GA 31209 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-0707593

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are over 79,000 school-age, at-risk youth living in our service area - youth who are living at or below the poverty level, attending Title I schools, living in gang infested neighborhoods, living in single parent homes, living in rural areas, living within a drug or domestic violence environment. These youth are struggling to graduate from high school, struggling to make a better life for themselves, struggling to reach for their potential. These youth need a trusted guide, a role model - someone who cares about the path they take, and cares to defend their potential.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mentoring Children

To match kids with positive role models who provide meaningful friendships and share fun experiences. We serve school age children at risk of failure or delinquency. We target children of incarcerated parents, children at risk of truancy, and children of hispanic heritage to provide positive adult role models to help the children succeed in life.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Program provides positive role models as mentors to youth who have at least one parent in prison, breaking the cycle of incarceration and encouraging academic achievement and positive social skills and decisions.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Proivdes mentors for youth who are of hispanic heritage, offering encouragement, cultural sensitivity, academic and social support.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Part of the nationwide Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Bigs in Blue program designed to help the community trust law enforcement officers by placing law enforcement personnel as mentors in the schools - not only providing mentors for at-risk youth, but helping build trust first through the youth, then their family, and the community as a whole.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Big Brothers Big Sisters Agency of the Year 2006

Big Brothers big Sisters of America

Affiliations & memberships

Afterschool Alliance 2009

RE-entry Coalition 2010

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentoring Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth served in 2018. Youth graduate and leave the program. Matches are lasting longer

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentoring Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Mentoring Children

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Mentors recruited each year including those serving youth.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid using illegal substances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentoring Children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% of the youth in the program have reported they avoided using illegal substances

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentoring Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth in active one-to-one mentoring relationships

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentoring Children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth self report on BBBS Youth Outcomes Survey. 87% of community based matches and 86% of school based matches report positive avoidance each year.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Big Brothers Big Sisters goals are to serve as many at-risk youth in our area as is possible - to help improve their education achievement, improve their social abilities, help them to realize their potential and have the support and guidance to graduate from high school, go on to secondary education or the military, and to become strong, productive, positive, giving members of our community.

Through the evidence-based Big Brothers Big Sisters program we provide carefully screened and trained mentors to work with the youth one-to-one in a strong match relationship either within the school walls or outside in the community. To ensure a long term relationship lasting a minimum of one year, we provide monthly support and monitoring for the mentor, the youth, and the parent/guardian - along with providing activities, workshops, and resources for the match and for the youth's family. We work with community partners to recruit positive volunteer mentors, and to provide workshops and activities for the matches and parents. We conduct frequent surveys with the mentors, the youth, and the parents to monitor and measure the positive effects on the child's development as well as provide aggregate data to indicate the effectiveness of our program.

The agency has been serving at-risk youth with one-to-one mentors for over 65 years. As a Big Brothers Big Sisters agency, we adhere to the evidence based "Standards of Practice" for all BBBS agencies, putting the safety of the child first in all actions. All of our core mentoring practices align with the standards outlined in the "Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring". Our staff are highly trained and have an accumulated 83 years of experience, and average of over 9 years per employee. We serve an average of 350-400 youth per year.

Over the past 18 years, the agency has provide more than 10,000 youth with one to one mentors. We have established a strong relationship with Robins Air Force Base, providing mentors for youth in the local schools. We have involved the area college students as mentors, worked with the fraternities and sororities to provide mentors and resources, and engage high school students as mentors to youth in the elementary schools. For the past several years, at least 90 of our current or former "Littles" (mentees) have graduated from high school - youth who were referred to our program because they were not on the path to graduation. And they not only graduated from high school, 905 of those youth went on to post high school education or the military. Our matches last an average of 34 months - providing support and guidance for hundreds of youth each year. In the upcoming years we will work more with youth involved with juvenile justice and youth affected by opiod abuse.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve at-risk youth and their families in Central Georgia. We gather feedback from all of our stakeholders, including partners, schools, government entities, community organizations, and law enforcement in addition to our volunteers, parents, and youth.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Heart of Georgia, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Heart of Georgia, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Gary Rosser, Jr.

Cadence Bank

Term: 2020 - 2021

Brittany Beauchamp

Rolando Dixon

Latasha Garvin

James Williams

Cassandra Cox

Amy Rowley

Joe Powers

Mike Sanford

Jade Morey

Del Moses

Dr. Tatrabian Jackson

Mallerina Marshall

Kimberly Odom

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/26/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.