National Peace Corps Association

A United Force for Good

aka NPCA   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.peacecorpsconnect.org

Mission

The National Peace Corps Association's mission is to champion lifelong commitment to Peace Corps ideals.

Our Goals:
1) Help the Peace Corps be the best that it can be.
2) Empower members and affiliate groups to thrive.
3) Amplify the Peace Corps community's global development impact.

Ruling year info

1981

President & CEO

Mr. Glenn Blumhorst

Main address

1900 L Street NW Suite 610

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

National Council of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers

EIN

58-1431113

NTEE code info

Promotion of International Understanding (Q20)

Mutual/Membership Benefit Organizations, Other N.E.C. (Y99)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Q01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Peace Corps community is a 250,000 strong, coming together to increase our collective impact through domestic and global projects.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Advocacy

Our heightened advocacy effort aims for an increase in federal appropriations for the Peace Corps from $410 million in 2017 to $600 million in 2022, sufficient to expand the number of serving Volunteers from 7,000 in 2017 to 10,000 and build the support programs they need to thrive. We seek not only funding but also legislation reforms necessary to protect Volunteers and pave the way for their success during service and beyond.

In 2016, NPCA built the Peace Corps community’s capacity for advocacy impact by launching an innovative email-campaign tool and multiplying face-to-face meetings with Members of Congress, resulting in record-breaking signatures on the annual Peace Corps Funding Letter as well as unprecedented healthcare legislation.

Population(s) Served

Over the last 36 years, NPCA has helped to build a robust network of more than 170 affiliate groups that provide a tangible sense of community for RPCVs, friends, and family as well as a vehicle to act on their commitment to Peace Corps ideals. These groups are increasingly cause oriented, focusing their efforts and expertise on society’s most pressing issues. At the center of this community, NPCA serves as a vital catalyst for affiliate groups and an amplifier of their efforts.

In 2016, community members contributed thousands of hours - through petitions, letters, emails, phone calls, and visits to legislators - to ensure that Peace Corps not only survives, but thrives. Record numbers became members of NPCA affiliate groups including 15 new ones – increasingly formed around causes like Peace Corps Community for the Support of Refugees. And thanks to our nascent Community Fund, members contributed nearly $400,000 to 137 development projects led by PCVs and RPCVs since 2015.

Population(s) Served

Reaching our target of 10,000 PCVs will allow us to increase our impact exponentially. By fielding many more PCVs, we will raise the quality of life in more communities around the globe through better access to education, health, water and sanitation, technology, and agricultural services. More PCVs will instill democratic ideals in more future leaders and institutions. Eventually, more RPCVs will serve as teachers, aid workers, diplomats, public officials, and social entrepreneurs. They will share the unique knowledge, skills, and cultural insight they gained abroad and continue to make our country and our world a better place.

NPCA's new impact-oriented business model has attracted investment from growing number of generous philanthropists. The Sargent Shriver Leaders Circle has swelled to nearly 200, reflecting a firm commitment to the causes at the heart of our mission.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new champions or stakeholders recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy

Context Notes

NPCA has seen steady growth in the recruitment of our volunteer advocacy coordinators, from 24 in 2013 to 44 as of August, 2017.

Number of new advocates recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

Our new electronic click-to-send advocacy site has experienced strong growth. From August through December 2015, the site had 993 users. In 2016, the number of users grew to 4,263. As of mid-August, u

Number of votes for or against specific policies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Impact

Context Notes

Our best measure for tracking is our annual Dear Colleague letters supporting Peace Corps funding, held every year in the House of Representatives and most years in the Senate. In the House, the sign

Number of meetings with policymakers or candidates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy

Context Notes

District meetings have increased from 53 in 2013, to 80 through August 2017.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

-A bigger, better Peace Corps with increased funding to support 10,000 volunteers and the programs and policies they need to thrive during their service and beyond

-A thriving community with a network of 250 affiliate groups with the capacity to engage 225,000 members who are empowered to act on their ideals

-Amplified development impact through partnerships that increase access to financial/technical resources, expanding impact opportunities for individuals and groups

A bigger, better Peace Corps: In 2017, NPCA expanded the Peace Corps community's capacity for advocacy impact through an innovative email-campaign tool and multiplying face-to-face meetings with Members of Congress, resulting in record-breaking signatures on the annual Peace Corps Funding Letter as well as unprecedented healthcare legislation.

A thriving community: In 2017, 16 new groups formed, expanding the size and diversity of our affiliate network. NPCA provides these nascent groups with mentoring in organizational development as well as technical support, while promoting and championing their causes. Affiliate groups seek greater impact, and for this they need improved member engagement and connectivity with other groups. Enter NPCA's website and community builder platform. Following the 2016 rollout, the demand to join the platform has been overwhelming, with dozens of affiliate groups already in the pipeline.

Amplified development impact: In 2017, NPCA expanded the Community Fund-a bold resource-mobilizing, cause-oriented investment vehicle that catalyzes the Peace Corps community as a movement for peace and prosperity. The Community Fund focuses resources for PCV and RPCV development initiatives in three impact areas: water and sanitation, girls' empowerment and education, and microenterprise.

To achieve our ambitious goals, NPCA will implement an unprecedented organizational capacity-building action plan, extending the flagship capacity-building investments as follows:

-Board Development-Led by a board of directors that includes experts in the fields of advocacy, social entrepreneurship, and public-private partnerships, NPCA will adopt a realigned governance and management structure

-Staff development-Over the next five years, we will expand our skeleton staff by hiring innovative and entrepreneurial professionals in administration, finance, communications, and IT that will permit us to make our community the best it can be

-Technical development-we will acquire essential new technology to innovatively engage our growing community, particularly millennials and generation Xers. We will also build an improved cloud-based informational backbone to fuel productivity

Our organization strives for:

-A Peace Corps of 10,000 strong. Key Strategies: 1) Building Peace Corps community capacity for sustained advocacy and 2) Engaging with Congress, the Office of Management and Budget, the White House, and the private sector to achieve a larger Peace Corps budget and the legislation needed to improve and expand its operations. Impact: 3,000 more PCVs annually who can effectively advance sustainable human development and cross-cultural understanding and a corresponding surge in RPCVs with potential for lifelong commitment to Peace Corps ideals.

-A Network of 250 affiliate groups engaging 125,000 individuals acting on their ideals. Key strategies: 1) Increase the number of affiliate groups, 2) Provide technical and organizational support to affiliate groups, and 3) Facilitate leadership of community-based and nation-wide campaigns on issues that members care about most, so as to build our community's capacity for collective action. Impact: A thriving community mobilized to act on their ideals of greater prosperity, understanding, and peace.

-Exponentially increase our Peace Corps community's impact. Key strategies: 1) Partner with like-minded organizations who will engage (R) PCVs in their projects and programs, 2) Build a powerful vehicle to attract and disperse funds, and 3) Ensure that these community-based initiatives have the technical support they need for success, so that more individuals, corporations, and foundations will have expanded opportunities to advance Peace Corps ideals.

Financials

National Peace Corps Association
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Peace Corps Association

Board of directors
as of 6/18/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

J. Henry Ambrose

Retired

Term: 2017 - 2018

J. Henry (Hank) Ambrose

Retired

Jayne Booker

David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Sandra Bunch

ACDI/VOCA

Randolph (Randy) Adams

Virginia International University

Keith Beck

Visiting Angels / Proforma Pacific Systems

Glenn Blumhorst

Ex-Officio

Bridget Davis

Homemaker / Fundraiser

Patrick Fine

FHI 360

Corey Griffin

Global Government and Industry Partners, LLC (2GIP)

Madeleine Kadas

Beveridge & Diamond

Chip Levengood

Retired

Katie Long

Friends of Patterson Park

Jed Meline

USAID

Mary Owen

ABC7 Chicago

Tom Potter

Retired

Sue Senecah

Groundwork

Maricarmen Smith-Martinez

Bixal

Linda Stingl

Write On, llc

Tai Sunnanon

si3 group

Rhett Power

Wild Creations

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes