ATLANTA CENTER FOR SELF SUFFICIENCY INC

Inspiring Hope and Making it Real!

aka ACSS   |   Atlanta, GA   |  www.atlantacss.org

Mission

Atlanta Center for Self Sufficiency (ACSS) empowers financially vulnerable individuals in our community to become self-sufficient, sustainably employed, and economic contributors to society.

Ruling year info

1989

President and CEO

Ms. Dana B Inman

Main address

460 Edgewood Ave SE

Atlanta, GA 30312 USA

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Formerly known as

Atlanta Enterprise Center

Samaritan House of Atlanta

EIN

58-1479816

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Atlanta Continuum of Care conducts an annual census to determine the scope of homelessness within the city. According to the most recent census conducted in January 2016, there are approximately 4,000 men, women and children that go to sleep unsheltered (800) or in temporary homeless shelters (1,782) and transitional housing programs (1,443) each night. Additionally, the most recent survey of the homeless population found that the three most common reasons cited for becoming homeless were lack of a job (55%), alcohol/drug use (37%), and/or lack of money (29%). As the data indicates, there is a need in Atlanta for employment readiness training, job placement assistance and resources that help individuals get back on their feet and begin the path to self-sufficiency and permanent housing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CareerWorks

CareerWorks is the largest job readiness and training program in Atlanta exclusively serving the homeless population. It is designed to comprehensively address tangible and emotional barriers to employment by preparing individuals to identify and attain short- and long-term career goals. CareerWorks offers robust front-end assessments, a 3-Week Job Readiness Training Program, career development planning, case management, and a range of supportive services.

Population(s) Served

ACSS' Veterans Employment Assistance Program support homeless veterans in their efforts to re-enter the workforce by providing outreach, assessment, skills building, individual case planning, job readiness training, job placement assistance, referrals to housing and other supportive services. Vocational and On-the-Job training opportunities are available through our Clean Street Team (CST) and other programs.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The purpose of ACSS is to empower homeless and financially vulnerable individuals, including veterans, to become sustainably employed by providing job training, career counseling and employment placement services, and in so doing, preparing them to become confident, independent economic contributors to society. ACSS will seek to achieve the following goals by 2019:

1. Expand beyond our current target population of homeless individuals to include additional categories of financially vulnerable individuals to grow our service capacity by 20%.
2. Achieve financial stability to support our programs and services by increasing our annual budget to $1,250,000.
3. Attract, develop, and retain the best and most inspired talent among employees, board members, and volunteers to ensure that we achieve our mission-based initiatives.
4. Further the ACSS brand to be recognized by the community as playing a pivotal role in eradicating homelessness and alleviating poverty.

ACSS will employ the following strategies to achieve our strategic goals:

Expand the range of ACSS’ target population to include recipients of subsidized housing vouchers (Rapid Rehousing, SSVF, Housing Choice, etc.); young adults (aged 18-24) who are aging out of the foster care system or similar programs; and formerly incarcerated individuals returning to the community.

Focus geographic expansion via CareerWorks Access to areas in which partner agencies and employer partners can be identified (specifically North Fulton, Gwinnett, Dekalb and Rockdale counties).

Create pathways to assist all CareerWorks participants to enroll in vocational training, thus increasing their employment opportunities and potential starting wage upon placement.

ACSS plays a critical role along Atlanta's continuum of care and is uniquely positioned to assess, train and motivate individuals to achieve economic self sufficiency and thrive. A key differentiator between ACSS and other employment-focused organizations serving similar clientele is our emphasis on long-term outcomes – job placement, job retention and stabilized housing. We focus on solidly preparing our clients for permanent success, in contrast to short-term temporary placements, such as day labor. Additionally, we do not prescribe specific career paths for our clients based on predetermined programming; rather ACSS clients are encouraged to explore career paths that are relevant to their experience and training, aligned with their skills and aptitude, and viable based on the local labor market. Since 2010, ACSS has helped more than 2,530 homeless individuals obtain sustainable full-time employment and ultimately self-sufficiency.

Our 2018 outcomes will be reported at year's end.

In 2017, 250 men and women graduated from the CareerWorks employment readiness program (including 66 veterans), 187 individuals obtained full-time employment at an average starting wage of $11.80 per hour (a 14% increase over the 2016 starting average wage), and 89% of employed ACSS graduates retained their jobs for six months or more .

Financials

ATLANTA CENTER FOR SELF SUFFICIENCY INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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ATLANTA CENTER FOR SELF SUFFICIENCY INC

Board of directors
as of 09/05/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Cynthia Norville

Suntrust Bank


Board co-chair

Ms. Kandis Wood Jackson

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Mike Landry

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David Olmore

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Linda Jameson

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Sarrah Schoenewald

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Sean Fogarty

Cory Bennett

Bennett Thrasher

Alan Berry

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Michael Broaders

Andrew Wells

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Jeremy Cranford

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Ellen Schorenstein Williams

Gene Likins

Jon Pugh

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Richard Reid

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Barbara Hughes

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes