Triangle Land Conservancy

Improving our lives through conservation

aka Triangle Land Conservancy   |   Durham, NC   |  https://www.triangleland.org/

Mission

Triangle Land Conservancy strives to create a healthier and more vibrant Triangle region by safeguarding clean water, protecting natural habitats, supporting local farms and food, and connecting people with nature through land protection and stewardship, catalyzing community action, and collaboration. We see the Triangle region as an increasingly healthy and vibrant place to live where wild and working lands are protected and everyone has access to open space, clean water, and local food.

Ruling year info

1983

Executive Director

Sandy Sweitzer

Main address

514 S. Duke St

Durham, NC 27701 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1514406

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Farmland Preservation (K25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2021, 2020 and 2019.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

By 2035, almost a million new people will be added to the existing population of 2.1 million in the Triangle region of North Carolina. An important attraction is the region’s outdoor recreational opportunities and green spaces. It is imperative that Triangle Land Conservancy keep pace with development by ensuring that green space is protected as the population grows. TLC’s mission is to create a healthier and more vibrant Triangle region by safeguarding clean water, protecting natural habitats, supporting local farms and food, and connecting all people with nature. Our work will continue to focus on clean water on almost all our projects, as both climate change and development threaten the Triangle’s precious supplies. TLC has set an aggressive goal for 2025: Protect 25,000 acres by adding an average of 1,000 acres of conserved land each year. As of June 2020, we have protected over 20,000 acres.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Land Conservation

Land protection in the 6-county Triangle region of North Carolina; Stewardship of TLC's 10,000 acres of important conservation land; Planning and advocacy work to identify the most important lands for protection and educate landowners and government officials for more land protection in the 6 counties of the Triangle; Fundraising activities to maintain and expand TLC's membership program and continue funding TLC's critical operations.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Accreditations

Land Trust Accreditation Commission 2016

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Clean water: Identify and protect priority lands in the Neuse River and Upper Cape Fear/Jordan Lake watersheds. (A watershed is an area of land from which rain and runoff will drain to a specific river.)The Upper Neuse watershed contains nine public drinking water supply reservoirs that together serve about 500,000 people in the Triangle. The Upper Cape Fear/Jordan Lake watershed contains ten public drinking water reservoirs, portions of ten counties and serves about 700,000 people. Specifically, from 2018-2025:

• Protect an additional 5,000 acres in the Upper Neuse Watershed;
• Protect an additional 2,000 acres of land in the Cape Fear Basin;
• Increase advocacy efforts to ensure continued funding of North Carolina’s three conservation trust funds.

Connecting people to nature: Create opportunities for ALL people to deepen their connection to the natural world:

• Open our 8th public nature preserve, Bailey and Sarah Williamson Preserve, in 2020;
• Build 25 more miles of trail by 2025;
• Increase reach of educational programs by 50 percent by 2025;
• Increase ethnic diversity of TLC members, volunteers, vendors, board members, and staff by 25 percent by 2025;
• Expand existing preserves and their buffers;
• Prioritize land protection efforts along the Neuse, Haw, and Deep Rivers and designated blueways (paddle trails), like the Deep River
State Trail, and existing and future greenway corridors, like the Mountains-to-Sea Trail.

Protecting natural habitats: Protect, connect, and buffer important natural areas (as defined by NC’s Natural Heritage Program as lands or waters that are important for the natural biodiversity in the state).

• Conserve 75 percent of unprotected Natural Heritage sites;
• Add 1,000 acres to buffer existing preserves;
• Increase educational resources;
• Help manage and monitor additional inventorying by NC’s Natural Heritage Program;
• Expand Citizen Science projects.

Supporting local farms and food: Support increased opportunities for sustainable food production and protection of historic farm communities.

• From 2018 to 2025, protect 3,000 acres of high priority farmland;
• Develop Williamson Farm Preserve as a model preserve; activate NextGen project at Williamson Farm Preserve to support new farmers;
• Build on success of existing collaborations such as Transplanting Traditions Community Farm;
• Host agricultural education groups;
• Provide support and complement community efforts to fill gaps in local food systems.

TLC strives to create a healthier and more vibrant Triangle region by safeguarding clean water, protecting natural habitats, supporting local farms and food, and connecting people with nature through land protection and stewardship, catalyzing community action, and collaboration. To this end, in our Strategic Action Plan, TLC has identified specific landscapes as Conservation Initiatives:

Jordan Lake One Water (JLOW): JLOW Conservation Strategy provides a framework for protecting drinking water supply resources through land protection. Jordan Lake supplies drinking water to nearly 700,000 people.

Chatham County Working Lands: A farming community in northwestern Chatham County has supported the growing Triangle and Triad for over 100 years. TLC works with local livestock growers, dairies, and vegetable producers to conserve this critical farmland through a variety of conservation tools.

Deep River: Along the Deep River, natural treasures and historic troves lie in hiding. But nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen as well as mud and sediment degrade the river’s water quality for this important drinking water source for Chatham and Lee Counties.

Eno-New Hope Landscape Conservation Plan: This Conservation Plan focuses on the critical importance of habitat connectivity for wildlife in the Eno River and New Hope Creek watersheds in Chatham, Durham, Orange, and Wake counties.

Johnston County Farmland: Johnston County has a rich cultural history rooted in agriculture dating back to pre-colonial times. But population growth poses a serious challenge to the future of agriculture in Johnston County. The county’s population is one of the fastest-growing in the state.

Marks Creek: Only 10 miles from the state capital of Raleigh, historic homes, old barns, pastures, country stores, ponds, wetlands, forests, and rural churches line the roads. The Marks Creek watershed includes an undeveloped area of more than 7,500 acres in size -- it has the potential to be a huge natural park, larger than the very popular Umstead State Park outside Raleigh.

Neuse River Lowgrounds: South of Smithfield, the Neuse River spreads into a vast floodplain four miles wide that is one of the most extraordinary wilderness areas in the southeast – it’s completely undeveloped and roadless for 72 square miles, or 36,000 acres. It's also critical to communities downstream since the massive floodplain is so effective at filtering impurities from stormwater.

New Hope Creek: On the edge of two of the fastest-growing cities in North Carolina, New Hope Creek becomes a lazy floodplain stream meandering its way south to Jordan Lake, the drinking water supply for thousands of Triangle residents.

Upper Neuse Clean Water Initiative: UNCWI is a partnership effort to prioritize and protect those lands most critical for the long-term safety and health of all drinking water supplies for the communities in the Upper Neuse River Basin, about 500,000 people.

Triangle Land Conservancy has an impressive track record for protecting the Triangle’s most valuable conservation lands. Out of our Strategic Action Plan goal to protect 25,000 acres between 2018 - 2025, we have already protected over 20,000 acres!* We plan to continue working with our extensive list of partners, our highly motivated Board of Directors and staff members, as well as our network of generous supporters to sustain and propel our work into the future.

*as of 9/10/2020

By the end of 2019, TLC has protected almost 20,000 acres of land. We laid the groundwork to implement our new Strategic Action Plan, starting with operational excellence: We added six new positions to support our efforts to accelerate the pace of conservation in the Triangle. We also added acreage to our preserves, continued our work with partners, and developed partnerships with local farmers with an eye to recruiting farmers at Williamson Farm Preserve.

Safeguarding Clean Water
• TLC developed important frameworks and partnerships in FY19 to protect clean water throughout the region, working with the Jordan Lake One-Water (JLOW) initiative to complete the Jordan Lake Watershed Conservation Strategy. JLOW will guide local governments and land conservation organizations in their efforts to protect water quality
• What’s next: We’ve also identified 10,000 parcels of land, totaling 385,000 acres, of priority conservation lands and set a goal of protecting an astounding 35,000 acres in the Jordan Lake region

Connecting People With Nature
• TLC increased ethnic diversity of staff and board by 25% in FY19. We acquired 60 acres to expand Brumley Nature Preserve, our most-visited preserve
• Partnered with Knightdale High School, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences’ Girls in Science program, East Durham Children’s Initiative, Boys and Girls Clubs, and others to provide 29 environmental education programs
• Built 3.5 miles of new trails at White Pines Nature Preserve, doubling the trail mileage at our oldest preserve
• What’s next: mapped and began construction on more than 10 miles of trails at Bailey and Sarah Williamson Preserve

Protecting Natural Habitats:
• Conserved 304 acres of buffer land — a ten-fold increase from FY18. Buffer lands help expand habitat corridors for wildlife
• Protected 105.5 acres of Natural Heritage Sites
• Connected all of TLC’s conservation efforts along Buffalo Creek to the Neuse River by conserving 70 acres in Johnston County
• Planted 6,000 longleaf pine seedlings at “For The Love of the Longleaf,” a volunteer workday at Williamson Preserve. Longleaf pine provides habitat for a broad range of species, including the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker

Supporting Local Farms and Foods:
• Launched the NextGen Farm project at Williamson Preserve, a key component of Wake County’s Food Security Plan
• Hired a NextGen Farm Manager who is responsible for establishing successful models of sustainable and regenerative agriculture at Williamson Preserve, as well as for recruiting and supporting new farmers in partnership with the Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CEFS)
• What’s next: Continue farmer recruitment and regenerative agriculture efforts at Williamson Preserve such as farming and grazing practices that reverse the effects of climate change by rebuilding soil organic matter and restoring degraded soil biodiversity, resulting in carbon drawdown and improving the water cycle

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Suggestion box/email, social media, voting for Board Members,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Triangle Land Conservancy
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Triangle Land Conservancy

Board of directors
as of 09/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Will Morgan

Manning, Fulton, & Skinner

Term: 2020 - 2023

Jack Blackmer

Retired Sr Manager of Quality, Environment, Health and Safety, Novozymes North America

Sam Cook

Executive Director of Forrest Assets, NCSU College of Natural Resources

Norris Cotton

First Vice President, Financial Advisor, Cotton Moehrke Group at Morgan Stanley

Toni Jones

Environmental Engineer and Entrepreneur

David Morris

Attorney, Forrest Firm P.C.

Danielle Spurlock

Assistant Professor, City and Regional Planning UNC Chapel Hill

Sean Wilson

Chief Executive Optimist, Fullsteam Brewery

Will Morgan

Partner; Manning, Fulton & Skinner

Johnny Burleson

Chief Advancement Officer; NC Museum of Art

Marlena Byrne

Deputy Chief Resilience Officer; NC Office of Recovery and Resiliency

Albert Fisher

Retired President & CEO of Community Partnerships, Inc.

Jay McLeod

Senior Planner and Project Manager

Clarenda Stanley

Sr Principal Gifts Officer, The Nature Conservancy; CEO of Green Heffa Farms, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/17/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/14/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.