Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay, Inc.

Together, we are defenders of potential

aka Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay   |   Tampa, FL   |  http://www.bbbstampabay.org

Mission

Our mission is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. We serve youth across Hillsborough, Pinellas, Polk, Pasco, Citrus, Hernando, Sumter, Marion, and Alachua Counties.

Ruling year info

1982

President and CEO

Stephen Koch

Main address

P.O. Box 21744

Tampa, FL 33622 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Tampa, Inc.

EIN

59-2173085

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Big Brothers Big Sisters wants all youth to achieve their full potential. We serve youth 5-18 years old through our evidence-based mentoring programs. We focus largely on youth at-risk for educational failure or involvement with the juvenile justice system. These risk factors include but are not limited to a child living in a single-parent home, living in kinship or foster care, living in poverty or a low-income environment, performing poorly in school, or having an incarcerated parent. Dedicated volunteers (“Bigs”) provide motivation, encouragement, and support to these youth so that each youth may achieve their full potential.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community-Based Mentoring

We serve Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Polk, Citrus, Hernando, Sumter, Marion, and Alachua counties. We match children, or Littles, starting at age 5 with background-screened and trained volunteers or Bigs.

In our Community-Based model, matches meet anywhere in the community -- the park, the beach, a sporting event, library, etc. -- for an average of 8 hours together each month.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Boys
Girls
LGBTQ people

We serve Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Polk, Citrus, Hernando, Sumter, Marion, and Alachua counties. We match children, or Littles, starting at age 5 with background-screened and trained volunteers or Bigs.

In our School-Based model, Bigs are matched with Littles in their school or afterschool site, and they meet weekly for an average of 4 hours together each month.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Girls
Boys
LGBTQ people

School-to-Work is a three-way partnership between the local school districts, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay, and our corporate and community partners to provide one-to-one mentoring in the workplace for high school juniors and seniors to help improve graduation rates. The students (Littles) visit the workplace of the employees (Bigs) one morning each month during the school year for about three hours. They spend an hour learning post-graduation skills, then spend one-to-one time with their Bigs through lunch before returning to school. This program is currently in Hillsborough, Pinellas, and Polk County.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
LGBTQ people

Bigs in Blue/Bigs with Badges is a national initiative designed to improve communication and understanding between law enforcement agencies and the communities they serve. Police officers and civilian staff (Bigs) visit an area child (Littles) at their school one hour per week to spend one-on-one mentoring time. The program was launched locally with the Tampa Police Department, where more than 35 officers and personnel are matched with elementary school children in Hillsborough County. Law enforcement agencies also have the option to host a School-to-Work program. This program serves children in Hillsborough, Pinellas, Polk, Pasco, Citrus, Hernando, Sumter, Marion, and Alachua counties.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Boys
Girls
Children and youth

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay’s Big Futures program serves Alumni Littles up to age 26 and their Mentors with additional support and guidance in helping Littles make educational and career choices. The goal of the Big Futures program is that our Alumni Littles will be enrolled, employed, or enlisted after high school so they earn a living wage by age 26 through goal setting and accountability, resources that align with their goals, skill-building workshops, and special events, and developing community relationships that result in unique education and career opportunities for Mentees. We are building an army of professionals in our community to rally around our youth! This program is available to Alumni Littles in Hillsborough, Pinellas, Polk, Pasco, Citrus, Hernando, Sumter, and Alachua Counties.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Young adults

Where we work

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Boys, Girls

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who are promoted to the next grade on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Boys, Girls

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who do not become involved in the juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Boys, Girls

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average match length in months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Boys, Girls

Related Program

Community-Based Mentoring

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All 32 of our Board Members donate financially to support Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Boys, Girls

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Boys, Girls

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay aims to empower our Littles to achieve success by defending their potential and removing barriers. We aim to increase grade promotion levels for the youth we serve as well as a decreased involvement with the Department of Juvenile Justice.

Our evidence-based model of one-to-one mentoring stands out from the rest because we provide professional support at every step of the way. This results in longer and stronger matches which means a greater positive impact. Research shows that the impact of one supportive adult in the life of a child can be world-changing. We provide that supportive adult.

We are an affiliate of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, the largest, oldest, and most recognized mentoring organization in the United States. We have a long history in the communities we serve of fiscal responsibility, quality services, and growth. We are staffed across our service area and adhere to the service delivery model set forth by our national office. The success of our mentoring programs can largely be attributed to our excellent volunteers but also the capabilities and commitment level of many of our employees, many of whom are Bigs themselves. We are passionate about mentoring. We are Defenders of Potential.

In 2020, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay matched just over 2,400 youth with a Big. We serve 8 counties in the greater Tampa Bay area and are currently planning to serve 1 additional county. Through strategic staffing and targeted service delivery, we plan to grow our impact to match even more youth in Tampa Bay with a mentor. We received the Gold Standard Award through our national office in 2017 & 2018 honoring our quality metrics as well as growth in service and financial development. We were also awarded the Pinnacle Award in 2018 for increasing their revenue and growing their overall number of Big & Little matches year-over-year for two or more consecutive years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve boys and girls (ages 5-12) who live in Alachua, Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough, Marion, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, or Sumter Counties, who want and have requested a Big Brother or Big Sister and who have been approved to do so by their parent/legal guardian, and who are typically at risk for academic failure or involvement with the juvenile justice system. Approximately 45% of the children we serve are boys, 55% are girls, and over 75% are children of color. Approximately 90% of the children we serve are growing up in families at or below the poverty level. These children are recommended to us by their school counselor, teacher, parents and other legal guardians, religious leaders, neighbors, or others.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    One recent change was to find volunteer Bigs who would be willing to work with their Littles in person, versus virtually. The parents/legal guardians of new children coming into our system, as well as those for existing children, requested in-person mentoring in almost all cases, as their children were wanting the benefits of in-person experiences and relationships. Virtual mentoring can work effectively but is not nearly as popular as in person.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Talking with all our Bigs, their Littles, and many of their parents/legal guardians on a regular basis, and conducting annual surveys on top of that, allows them to see the value we place in their opinions in terms of the training and other support they receive from us. It also has made a difference in how quickly we shifted back to in-person mentoring versus virtual mentoring. It has also impacted the amount of funds we budget for match activities and the type of those activities. In addition, allowing our funders, board, staff, community partners, and others tosee the results of our outcomes/surveys, allows them to see just how successful our mentoring programs are in improving/maintaining important areas of youth development, which contributes to better relationships with all.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tony Leavine

Brown & Brown Insurance

Term: 2021 -

Richard Salazar

Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney, PC

R. Kent Bailey

Bailey Family Foundation

Brian Auld

Tampa Bay Rays & Tampa Bay Rowdies

Stephen Koch

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tampa Bay, Inc.

Mary Ann Fullerton

Todd Fultz

SDI Construction

Kara Klinger

Deloitte, LLP

Tony Leavine

Brown & Brown Insurance

Vince Pavese

FIS Global

Kathleen Wade

Fee & Jeffries, PA

Tammy Davis

StevenDouglas

Lisa Langer

PNC

Kara LeComte

Bethlee McLaughlin

rue21

Danielle Vona

The Marketing Posse; Outback Steakhouse

Scott Walker

TD Synnex

Paul Edwards

Tampa Electric Company

John Allgeier

Moffit Cancer Center

Christopher Bauders, CFA

Bank of America

Ken Beattie

Flowbird

Chris Butler

Raymond James

Tiffany Colucci

Valley Bank

David DeWeese

Regions Banks

Isorys Dilone

Valet Living, LLC

Cristina Hale

BDO USA, LLC

Laura Hungiville

Centene Corporation

David Judd

Wehr Constructors

Shelley Powers

Transamerica

Nick Vojnovic

Little Greek

David Weinstein

Greenberg Trauig, P.A.

Casey Stein

JPMorgan Chase

Chris Nix

LCG Advisors

Alex Obenauf

KPMG

Abigail StClair

TeBella Tea Company

S. Scott Walker, Esq.

Folds & Walker, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.