Big Brothers Big Sisters of Miami

We are BIGGER together.

aka BBBS Miami   |   Miami, FL   |  http://www.bbbsmiami.org/

Mission

All youth have the ability to do BIG things. With a vision that all children achieve their full potential, BBBS Miami creates and supports one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. For over 60 years, BBBSM has been South Florida’s premier mentoring organization, defending the potential of future leaders in the community by matching at-risk youth (Littles) with committed adult mentors (Bigs). These relationships – strategically matched based on Littles’ needs and Bigs’ backgrounds and skills, as well as common interests, aspirations, and personalities – empower Littles to become productive members of the community.

Ruling year info

1965

President & CEO

Mr. Gale Sayers Nelson

Main address

Carnival Center for Excellence 550 NW 42nd Avenue

Miami, FL 33126 USA

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EIN

59-6166904

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Miami-Dade County Public Schools is the fourth largest school district in the United States, annually serving 350,000+ students. 69% of MDCPS students are eligible for free/reduced lunch. In total, Miami-Dade County is home to 550,000+ children, more than half of whom live with financial instability; 25.4% live in poverty, and additional 34% of households with children live in A.L.I.C.E., which is just above the poverty level with constant risk of falling into poverty. Poverty is associated with poor psychosocial development and increased risky behaviors, which lead to low-income children being more likely to experience teenage pregnancy and juvenile incarceration. Children who grow up in low-income households are less likely to graduate high school, and those without high school diplomas are three times more likely to be unemployed, 2.5 times more likely to rely on government assistance throughout their lives, and 3.5 times more likely to be arrested at some point in their lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

One-to-One Mentoring

Children and teens, aged 5-18 (Littles), are strategically matched with a committed adult volunteer (Big), who develops and maintains a trusted relationship, serving as a positive role model and source of reliable support. Matches are based Littles’ needs and Bigs’ backgrounds and skills, as well as common interests, aspirations, and personalities, allowing for a strong connection to grow over time. Bigs model positive behaviors, point out teachable moments, and provide guidance and inspiration. One-to-one mentoring programs are comprised of community-based mentoring, Bigs in Schools, School to Work, a Graduate Program, and Bigs in Blue – all described below.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Twice a month, Bigs and Littles explore the local community and share fun, educational and culturally enriching activities they both enjoy. BBBSM staff works with Bigs, Littles, and Littles’ families to encourage a continuous relationship through regular check-ins, as well as through coaching sessions on how to handle difficult situations for Bigs. They also coordinate fun and engaging, culturally enriching programmatic events throughout the year; these events include a back-to-school event, holiday celebrations and more.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Bigs and Littles spend time together on a weekly basis throughout the school year. Bigs visit their Littles at school or at a designated after-school program, such as BBBSM’s Group Engagement & Mentoring. Although not exclusive to younger volunteers, this program allows high school students who have mentors themselves to pass along the lessons they have learned and volunteer their time as a mentor to a younger child, serving as a positive role model who offers support and guidance throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

School to Work provides Littles in high school students with career readiness and job-shadowing experiences at an actual place of work. Working closely with MDCPS and corporate partners, BBBSM transports Littles once a month from school to a designated corporate partner site, where they are matched one-to-one with a Big. In addition to job shadowing and mentoring, students participate in customized workshops to learn basic life and employability skills, such as appropriate dress, interpersonal interactions, public speaking, time management, conflict in the workplace, personal finance and the necessity of an advanced degree for career growth.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

The Graduate Program allows Littles who would have otherwise aged out of the BBBSM programs, along with their Bigs, to continue receiving professional match support as they transition into the early stages of adulthood. Whether a Little pursues higher education, trade school, the military or a career immediately after high school, the ongoing resources and coaching allow for the mentoring relationship to continue as the Littles enters a new phase of life. With many Littles coming from low-income households, they are likely the first ones in their families to attend college, making their Big an even more critical component of their success after high school.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

Bigs in Blue is a unique subset of BBBSM programs in which Littles are matched with Bigs who are local police officers. Bigs in Blue operates throughout all other one-to-one mentoring programs – in the community, at schools and at places of work (police departments). With 99% of BBBSM Littles being from families of African American, Hispanic, or mixed/other descent, Bigs in Blue has the added benefit of establishing and strengthening trust between communities of color and law enforcement.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Group Engagement and Mentoring (GEM) provides enhanced programming for youth who are waiting to be matched with a Big, as well as for those who are already matched. Youth in the programs engage in activities that have a positive impacts in one or more of five key areas, known as the BIG5 – Academic Enrichment, Career Pathways, Digital Literacy, Health & Wellness, and Music & the Arts.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Continuing Education programs provide post-secondary readiness programming, both to Littles in high school and to those who already graduated high school. With a combination of college success coaching through Take Stock in Children, workshops and career panels at the Carnival Center for Excellence, and college fairs at local institutions of higher education, the Continuing Education programs ensure that Littles are aware of all post-secondary options available to them.

Continuing Education also includes a scholarship component. Littles who are served through Take Stock in Children receive a full scholarship through the Florida Pre-Paid Program, and all graduating seniors have the opportunity to apply for a variety of scholarships through the Five Millers Scholarship Program, which includes scholarships from the Carnival Foundation, the Take Charge Foundation, the Lori Brener Memorial Scholarship Fund, and more.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Miami
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Miami

Board of directors
as of 08/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr Allan Prindle

Power Financial Credit Union

Term: 2022 - 2024


Board co-chair

Ms. Tina Van der ven

NewStar Media

Term: 2021 - 2023

Matt Gorson

Greenberg Traurig

Richard Kohan

AFO, LLC

Carolina Menendez

Iberia Bank

Gary Saslaw

Gary R. Saslaw, P.A.

Natalie Norfus

MDO Partners

Allan Prindle

Power Financial Credit Union

Asha Elias

Tina Van der Ven

NewStar Media

Linda Coll

Carnival Foundation

Amanda Israel

Burger King McLamore Foundation

Bonnie Crabtree

Korn Ferry International

Julie Grimes

Hilton Bentley Hotel

Ricardo (Rick) Fernandez

Northern Trust

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data