PLATINUM2023

Brighton Center, Inc.

A Community of Support

aka Brighton Center   |   Newport, KY   |  www.brightoncenter.com

Mission

The mission of Brighton Center, Inc. is to create opportunities for individuals and families to reach self-sufficiency through family support services, education, and leadership throughout the communities of Northern Kentucky. We will achieve this mission by creating an environment, which rewards excellence and innovation, encourages mutual respect and maximizes resources.

Ruling year info

1968

President & CEO

Mrs. Wonda Winkler

Main address

PO Box 325

Newport, KY 41072 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Brighton Street Center

EIN

61-0673886

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Brighton Center predominantly reaches low-income, hardworking families struggling to make ends meet or seeking a better quality of life. Our recent Community Assessment showed that close to 70% of those we serve are working. The other 30% include those on fixed incomes, such as the elderly on social security or those receiving disability. Our priority population is families under 200% of poverty. Many of the families served are single mothers with children, often with at least one child under the age of six. We also see that many of the adults served are working but not making a livable wage. We know, based on our most recent Community Assessment, that families want to make a livable wage with opportunities for advancement and to have their children healthy, happy, and successful (specifically citing education and employment). Our array of 48 programs & services is designed to eliminate barriers and help families reach self-sufficiency through individualized program bundling.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Services

Youth Services operate the Youth Leadership Development and Teen Coalition program to build leadership and life skills with youth. Older adolescents at risk of homelessness are served through Homeward Bound Shelter and Residential, and Independent Living Program. Outreach programs include Street Outreach Program and Project Safe Place, a crisis intervention program in which local businesses participate.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Early Childhood Education programs serve children and their families through child development centers Bright Days and Early Scholars. Northern Kentucky Scholar House (NKSH) is a unique two-generation approach that addresses the comprehensive needs of children and their parents together. NKSH offers safe, affordable housing, high-quality child development services, connection to family and work supports, academic help, and a supportive community of single parents all working toward a common goal.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Family Center helps families reach self-sufficiency through an emergency assistance program offering food, clothing, rent, utilities, and connection to the continuum of Brighton Center programs to support long-term stability. Every Child Succeeds provides home visitation for first-time parents. Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters provides home visitation to families with children ages 3-5.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Financial Wellness & Volunteer Engagement provides both a continuum of financial services, as well as volunteer opportunities within Brighton Center and throughout Northern Kentucky (NKY). We partner with families to develop budgets, understand credit, and create the financial literacy needed to build assets and assist with tax preparation. Volunteer engagement includes volunteers at the Center, older adults serving local non-profits through the Retired & Senior Volunteer Program, educating seniors on the issue of Medicare fraud, and providing support to seniors in our Senior Buildings.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Recovery Services includes Brighton Recovery Center, which is a 100-bed facility located in Boone County that provides residential long-term (approximately 9 months) recovery services for women 18 and older. It is part of the Recovery Kentucky Initiative in the Commonwealth of Kentucky created to help Kentuckians recover from substance abuse, which often leads to chronic homelessness. Sober Living offers a safe sober living environment for 5 women who have successfully completed a Recovery Kentucky program and need affordable housing. CENTER TABLE-Catering with a Purpose is a social enterprise catering program that offers residents the opportunity to learn the catering business and an opportunity to gain experience in the food industry. In Fiscal Year 2018, 356 women were served through the Brighton Recovery Center with 66 women completing all phases of the program. All 18 women in Sober Living completed at least 3 of 6 goals on their case plan upon 3 months of being in the program. In Fiscal Year 2018, 374 women were served through programs and services.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Adults

Workforce Development provides a variety of programs centered around obtaining living-wage employment. Center for Employment Training is a competency-based comprehensive vocational and life skills training program. City Futures is a project in partnership with The Housing Authority of Covington in which career coaching, community supports, and financial coaching are available to the residents of City Heights. Trades to Success is a pre-apprenticeship program that explores trade and apprenticeship careers, job training, and post-secondary education opportunities. Campbell County Detention Center’s Chemical Dependency Program is designed for women to provide a 6-month in-patient treatment model while incarcerated, which is followed by 24 months of supportive services by community partners.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Adults

Through the Kentucky Career Centers, Brighton Center serves as the Operator and Direct Service provider for Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) services in Northern Kentucky. Talent Development Services provides WIOA services to adult, youth, and dislocated workers, as well as employers. The Kentucky Career Center Operator coordinates the delivery of services between partners in Covington, Florence, Carrollton, and Grant County.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Young adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Students

Brighton Center has a wholly owned subsidiary known as Brighton Properties, Inc. Brighton Properties acquires real estate for the purpose of renting or leasing to Brighton Center or other non-profit charitable organizations. Brighton Properties has developed and oversees 290 units of affordable housing such as Two Rivers, Austinburg, and Saratoga Place Apartments for seniors. Other projects include Newport Commons (12 disabled rental units) and Williams Place Apartments (29 multi-family rental units). Support Services for the elderly include the Newport East Senior Center (a cooperative program with Northern Kentucky Area Development District) and social services for residents of HUD Section 202 elderly/handicapped housing.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Financial Wellness & Volunteer Engagement

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Financial Wellness & Volunteer Engagement

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Individuals received help during a crisis, had a basic need met, and received connection to other services in the community.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Everyone who seeks basic needs services through Brighton Center also meets with a Resource Advocate to receive connections to additional services/create a plan toward achieving self-sufficiency.

Number of tax returns completed by volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Financial Wellness & Volunteer Engagement

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of tax returns completed each year is highly dependent on how many volunteers we have. Volunteers are certified through the IRS to complete tax returns.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people

Related Program

Workforce Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number reflects our Center For Employment Training program which provides skill training in Health Technology Administration, Medical Assisting, and Human Resources & Payroll Specialist.

Number of youth who receive crisis intervention services through the hotline or accessing shelter for non-residential services.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Youth served through our Homeward Bound Shelter. Homeward Bound is the only homeless shelter for youth ages 11-17 in Northern Kentucky.

Children served in our early childhood education programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Early Childhood Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes our Child Development Centers and Home Visitation Programs

Individuals attained recognized credentials related to achievement of educational skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people

Related Program

Kentucky Career Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Women served by Brighton Recovery Center (long-term residential treatment center with a peer driven model for substance abuse recovery)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers

Related Program

Recovery Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Brighton Center is a community-based organization and has maintained a connection to the community since our founding in 1966. Brighton Center’s direction and growth are determined by the community. In 1968, Catherine Spaulding College recommended conducting a Community Assessment to drive the future activities of the organization. Since then, every four years, we ask the individuals and families we serve, key stakeholders, and community leaders what their hopes and dreams are for themselves, their children, and the community. That information, in addition to regional and national data, helps us determine our long-term direction. The most recent Community Assessment resulted in four key areas: Core, Capacity, Culture, and Community, which will guide our strategic goals over the next four years.

Core
Build services and strategies into our core programs that significantly improve the outcomes for the customers we serve.

Capacity
To build an organizational infrastructure that supports growth, leadership at all levels, high-performing teams, and customers as they achieve their hopes and dreams.

Culture
We strive to create a diverse, inclusive, equitable, and anti-racist organization that actively identifies and opposes racism. Ownership, leadership, and investment are expected and set the standard for our core values in action.

Community
We are engaged in the community and provide vision, leadership, and innovation to advance strategies that lead to equitable and thriving communities.

• Housing - Drive a bold community response to address the complex housing needs of Northern Kentucky families and clearly define, develop, and align our comprehensive strategy accordingly.
• Workforce Development - Expand employer services in support of job quality and ensure impactful career pathway services exist to address the unique needs of service populations such as individuals with criminal backgrounds, in recovery, immigrant/refugee, Opportunity Youth, men aged 25-54, Baby Boomers, and women with caretaking responsibilities.
• Digital Access & Literacy - Customers have access to technology and have the digital literacy necessary to use technology in the most beneficial ways.
• Early Childhood and Youth Development - Safe quality care, education, and social-emotional skill building are a priority for birth to 18-year-olds, with an emphasis and focus on special populations.
• Employer of Choice - Brighton Center is a destination employer for a diverse staff that fosters high employee engagement and retention.
• Volunteers - The critical contribution of volunteers to the achievement of our mission is recognized and fully utilized throughout the Center.
• Communication - Powerful connections through communications (internally and externally) result in strengthened strategic partnerships and authentic relationships with customers, staff, volunteers, community partners, and donors.
• Technology - Transformative technology allows the Center to adapt and grow to meet the current and future needs of our organization.
• Research and Intellectual Property - Conduct research on Brighton Center’s model and use the research to advance the work in the field and inform the development and execution of an Intellectual Property Business Plan.
• Customer Voice - Service delivery is driven by customer voice and strategies are codesigned to meet customer and community needs.
• Approach - Our approach will support service integration that offers a 2-gen, family-centered philosophy throughout our service continuum with fidelity.
• Leadership and Succession - Leadership shows up at all levels of the organization and internal succession is prioritized.
• Racial Equity - Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion are “baked in” to the culture of our organization and result in concrete action for customers.
• Strategic Partnerships - Key strategic partnerships exist that advance unified collective responses to address needs that impact families.
• Systems Change - System change initiatives are advanced, aligned, and driven by customers and the community as a whole.
• Public Policy - Brighton Center has a clear and impactful Public Policy agenda that is informed by and accountable to customers.
• Newport - Our neighborhood-based work in Newport is reimagined and redesigned to meet the changing needs of our neighbors.

Brighton Center has diverse and robust financial sources. The current Fiscal Year (FY23) operating budget of $12,848,886 is evidence of the confidence government and other funders place in Brighton Center’s financial stewardship and program effectiveness. Brighton Center has over 55 years of experience in operating grants from federal, state, and non-government funders, including United Way.

Brighton Center’s Executive Team offers years of experience serving low-income individuals and families. President & CEO Wonda Winkler has served the agency for 30 years, Senior Vice President Melissa Hall Sommer for 34 years, Vice President Ellen Bates for 10 years, and Chief Financial & Administrative Officer June Miller’s fiscal oversight has ensured compliance with federal and state agencies, private foundations, and United Way for more than 35 years.

All Executive Leadership and the majority of our seven Department Directors have been promoted from within the organization, which speaks to our culture of ownership, investment, and leadership. The Executive Team and Department Directors collaborate with a Board of Directors to ensure Brighton Center’s relevance to individuals, families, and the community. The Board of Directors reflects the diversity of the community served. The Board operates under the Policy Model of service, and committees are aligned to strengthen the effectiveness of services and administrative functions and participate in the agency’s Continuous Quality Improvement processes with the Management Team of Executives and Department Directors. Department Directors collaborate but are provided autonomy that supports innovation.

Below is our impact over the last ten years (FY09 to FY18):

• 70,988 individuals (or 33,800 families) received help during a crisis, had a basic need met, or received a connection to other services in the community.
• 9,035 children were served in our early childhood education programs, and 91% enrolled for a program year were assessed age-appropriate in cognitive and language skills.
• 2,661 homeless and runaway youth received crisis services at Homeward Bound Shelter.
• 8,730 families served with free tax preparation resulting in $12,657,297 in tax refunds.
• 71,625 individuals received workforce services such as job fairs, job readiness, training, or placement. 89% of those placed retained employment at six months.
• 2,064 women were served residentially through Brighton Recovery Center for Women.

In addition, Brighton Center is an accredited charity through the Better Business Bureau and meets all standards for charitable accountability, including governance, finance, fundraising and information, and measuring effectiveness.

Brighton Center has offered Family Support services to assist families with low to moderate incomes since 1966. Strengthening families in all 8 NKY counties through 41 programs, we are the most comprehensive non-profit agency in Northern Kentucky. We have served our neighbors for 50+ years and developed trust and credibility with them.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Brighton Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Brighton Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/26/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Tom Stoll

Union Savings Bank


Board co-chair

Dan Groneck

Retired, US Bank

Dan Groneck

Retired, US Bank

Eric Johnson

Grant Thornton LLP

Damon V. Allen

Federal Home Loan Bank

Jodianne A. Broomall

Cincinnati Children's Medical Center

Sophia Depenbrock

NKY Scholar House Resident

David R. Fleischer

Alpha + Beta Strategies, LLC

Jim Garner

Garner Insurance Agency

Fred Haas III

National Band & Tag Company

Greta Hoffman-Walker

Hoffman Walker & Smith Attorneys at Law

Sarah E. Hughes

No. Central Area Health Ed. Ctr.

Ryan King

Medical Solutions

Dave Koeninger

Retired, Millennium Group

Jay Krebs

The Procter and Gamble Company

Michael Lakin

Horan

Heidi Murley

St. Elizabeth Physicians

Shannon O'Connell Egan

Graydon Head & Ritchey LLP

Brooks A. Parker

Messer Construction Company

Leyla Pena

Cincinnati Public Schools

Laura Pleiman

Boone County Fiscal Court

Jason V. Reed

Edmondson & Associates

Jill M. Scherff

Dinsmore & Shohl LLP

Maida Session

Duke Energy

Julie Sparks

Ernst & Young

Alan C. Thomas

Retired, NKU/Fort Thomas Education Foundation

Brian Todd

Clark Schaefer Hackett

Katie Walters

Q102/WKRQ FM Radio

Jason Wessel

St. Elizabeth Healthcare

Ingrid Washington

Gateway Community & Technical College

J. Rork Williams

Hillard Lyons

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/01/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.