PLATINUM2022

CASA, Inc.

Change a Child's Story.

aka CASA of the River Region   |   Louisville, KY   |  http://www.CASARiverRegion.org

Mission

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of the River Region supports and promotes court-appointed volunteer advocacy for abused,neglected, and dependent children so that they can thrive in safe, permanent homes.

Notes from the nonprofit

CASA is mandated by the Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS) 620.550 and .555. Despite this mandate, CASA receives no state funding. With the support of individuals, foundations, grants and private businesses, CASA has successfully served the best interests of children in the Greater Louisville area, helping thousands hurdle the trauma of abuse and neglect through the work of dedicated volunteers.

Ruling year info

1985

President & CEO

Mr. William Myers

Main address

982 Eastern Parkway Box 9

Louisville, KY 40217 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

61-1066568

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Children deserve to live in safe, nurturing homes where they are well cared for and valued. Unfortunately, many live in homes with little care or supervision lacking adequate, nutritional food, proper clothing, healthcare, or emotional support Some are simply neglected; others are verbally, physically or sexually abused.

These vulnerable children must appear in Family Court where they are most often removed from their home and placed in foster care, kinship care or a residential facility. They are frequently moved, frightened as caregivers and environments continually change.

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of the River Region trains volunteers to be the one consistent adult presence in their lives. CASA volunteers become a steadfast friend, a caring, trusted mentor and fierce advocate. CASA volunteers provide the Judge with recommendations for services, like counseling, special education resources and/or medical care.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Advocacy Academy

Volunteer program focuses on recruitment and training of volunteers appointed by a judge to represent the best interests of abused and neglected children in the court system.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Staff experts provide recruited volunteers with 30 hours of training and additional continuing education in-services throughout the year. Advocacy Support performs tasks vital to serving abused and neglected children, including providing volunteer support in court, acting as a liaison with court personnel, accompanying volunteers on home visits, assisting with court
reporting, and other duties. Staff members provide volunteers with the expertise and
knowledge to become highly effective advocates in court.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National CASA 1985

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Advocacy Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new abused or neglected children served by volunteers in your program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Advocacy Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new CASA volunteers trained and sworn in

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Advocacy Academy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new CASA volunteers assigned to cases

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Advocacy Academy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of CASA volunteers assigned to cases

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Advocacy Academy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The child welfare and juvenile justice systems are comprised of caring people and well-meaning entities, but they are ill-equipped to handle the volume and complexity of cases. This is why CASA exists. CASA plays a critical role in the lives of children and serves as an integral constituent in the welfare and justice systems. CASA volunteer advocates are highly effective in getting their recommendations accepted in court, and their reports lead to a higher number of services being ordered for children and families. Overall, CASA volunteers help the judge make better decisions for the short and long-term livelihood of children.

CASA's vision is to pair a trained volunteer with every abused and/or neglected child who needs one. Because children with a CASA volunteer spend less time in out-of-home care and experience fewer placement. More than 90% of children with a CASA volunteer never re-enter the system after they case is closed.

The organization's goals are:
1. Increase community awareness to recruit more potential volunteers.
2. Increase new volunteers trained and who take on new cases.
3. Increase number of children served.

CASA's vision is to pair an advocate with every child who needs one. CASA works toward fulfilling its vision through its key programs: Advocacy Academy (volunteer training program) and the Advocate Support & Life Skills for Older Youth (volunteer support and children's activities).

Advocacy Academy is CASA's volunteer and recruitment program where staff conduct 30 hours of education for every volunteer. Each potential volunteer is assigned an Advocacy Supervisor. Upon completion of in-class session, potential volunteers continue with multiple days of supervised court shadowing and in-home visits. Their respective Advocacy Supervisors will continue with more individualized training by reviewing cases and court reports. Once the volunteer has completed all the above requirements, they are sworn in by the Family Court Judge.

The Advocate Support Program ensures proper supervision of volunteer advocates who have successfully completed the training program. Each volunteer, under the supervision of an Advocacy Supervisor, chooses one case appointed by a family court judge. CASA limits one staff member to manage a maximum of 30 volunteers. Staff members perform tasks vital to serving vulnerable children, as well as provide volunteers with their expert knowledge and emotional and mental support for all cases.

CASA volunteers make a commitment to provide quality mentoring weekly on one to two cases only. With volunteer's current personal involvement, it positions CASA to be a logical provider of life skills services. Life Skills Academy will provide quality out-of-school time programs that develop skills in self-sufficiency—financial literacy, job readiness/career planning, and, relationship building/community connections.

For over 30 years, CASA of the River Region has provided direct advocacy services to children (from birth to 18 years of age) with active abuse and neglect cases in Family Court. We now serve Jefferson, Oldham, Shelby, Trimble, Spencer and Henry Counties.

The child welfare and juvenile justice systems are comprised of caring people and well-meaning entities, but they are ill-equipped to handle the volume and complexity of cases. This is why CASA exists. CASA plays a critical role in the lives of children and serves as an integral constituent in the welfare and justice systems. CASA volunteer advocates are highly effective in getting their recommendations accepted in court, and their reports lead to a higher number of services being ordered for children and families. Overall, CASA volunteers help the judge make better decisions for the short and long-term livelihood of children.

• Children with CASA volunteers spend less time in out-of-home care and experience fewer placements. More than 90% of children with volunteer advocates never re-enter the system, a significant difference compared to the general foster care population.

• Because of our volunteers' detailed knowledge of the children's circumstances, children with a CASA receive more court-ordered services.

• CASA makes an important economic contribution by delivering greater efficiency in government systems (saving millions of dollars in State and local government expenses), and helps produce significantly improved outcomes for abused and neglected children.

• Children with CASA volunteers are less likely to spend time in long-term care, and their cases are more likely to remain permanently closed after final disposition.

During 2017, CASA:
• Provided advocacy services to 563 children (a 20% increase over 2016).

• Provided back-to-school supplies to 113 children and holiday gifts to 192 children.

• Trained and paired 69 new volunteers with a case (a 92% increase over 2016) resulting in 179 trained CASAs.

• In 2017, volunteers contributed approximately 31,387 advocacy hours. This is equivalent to approximately $753,288, if compensated for their service.

• The average months of care for a child in Jefferson County is 24.5 months with a cost of $2,456.87 per month. The average months of care for a child with a CASA is 16.22. Last year, 131 CASA children were reunified, adopted or given permanent relative placement. This saved Jefferson County $2.6 million.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We collect feedback surveys from volunteers and community partners.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We implemented advisory groups to receive greater input from our stakeholders.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

CASA, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CASA, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/12/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. D. Leon Mooneyhan

Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative

Term: 2020 - 2023

Carol Lomicka

Coulter Ridge Capital

Ashlyn Ackerman

CITY Properties Group

Jessica Wissing

Glenview Trust

Emiliy Digenis

COO, KAPSI, PLLC

Heather Metts

LG&E-KU

Johanna Wheatley

Republic Bank

Carl Heick

Ameriprise Financial

Callie Baumann

CVS

Steven Blevins

Glenview Trust

Kevin Brown

JCPS

Michael Henry

Texas Roadhouse

Jonathan Johnson

PNC

Erica Lee

Brown-Forman

Matthew Nichols

Churchill Downs

Mitchell Payne

Retired

Bryan Sisto

Frost Brown Todd

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/5/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/23/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.