Religion, Spiritual Development

LEXINGTON RESCUE MISSION INC

Reaching Hearts, Changing Lives

Lexington, KY

Mission

Lexington Rescue Mission exists to serve and glorify God through Christ-centered ministry that meets the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of hurting people in the greater Lexington area.

Ruling Year

2001

Executive Director

Mr. Jim B. Connell

Main Address

P.O. Box 1050

Lexington, KY 40588 USA

Keywords

poor, mission, homeless, Christian, human services, recovery, employment, housing, health, life skills

EIN

61-1387338

 Number

3142850393

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Christian (X20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

Lexington Rescue Mission works to address poverty and the issues that stem from it: hunger, homelessness, unemployment, incarceration, and hopelessness. In Lexington, 17.9% of residents live in poverty, and in our neighborhood, 43.9% of residents live in poverty. Not having enough access to food is just one symptom of poverty. According to Feeding America's 2017 report, 48,630 individuals in Lexington have limited or uncertain access to enough food. Many of those struggling with hunger are also unemployed or underemployed. In the Fayette County Labor Market Area, approximately 8,500 residents are unemployed, and those who often face the biggest hurdles to employment are those leaving jail or prison. An average of 979 men and women return to Fayette County from incarceration each year, needing significant help finding jobs and housing. Homelessness is also prevalent in Lexington, with 685 people currently experiencing homelessness in our community, many for the first time.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Outreach Center

The Potter's House

Jobs for Life

Breaking Chains

Advance Lexington

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of participants who gain employment

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Unemployed, underemployed, and dislocated people

Related program

Jobs for Life

Context notes

In 2017, we employed 56 job-seekers in 103 temporary assignments, and 74% are still working. We also placed 40 people directly in permanent jobs, and 72% of them are still employed after six months.

Number of donors retained

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Context notes

As of December 31, 2017, we had 7,461 active donors (donors who had given in the last 12 months).

Total number of arrests across clients

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Incarcerated people and formerly incarcerated people

Related program

Breaking Chains

Context notes

Breaking Chains serves men and women incarcerated in Fayette, Jessamine, and Woodford County Detention Centers as well as Northpoint prison. In 2017, 89 people completed case plans and 5 recidivated.

Number of clients living independently

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Homeless people

Related program

Outreach Center

Context notes

Our Homeless Intervention Program placed 12 households in housing in 2017. Four out of 5 housed three months ago have maintained housing and both those housed six months ago maintained their housing.

Number of meals served or provided

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people,

Homeless people,

Unemployed, underemployed, and dislocated people

Related program

Outreach Center

Number of people reached with the Gospel of Jesus Christ

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Outreach Center

Context notes

In 2017, 163 people visited Steady Hands 712 times to hear the Gospel and connect to God. Additionally, we had 564 chapel visits and 49 pastoral counseling sessions.

Number of clients in residential care

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Males,

Homeless people,

People who abuse drugs, alcohol, or other substances

Related program

The Potter's House

Context notes

In 2017, we housed 45 men at our transitional home, The Potter's House.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

1) People will take steps out of poverty through financial stability. Individuals and families struggling to make ends meet, living paycheck to paycheck, are often one emergency away from homelessness. Many of these folks find their way to the Mission for help with food, clothing, or other necessities. We work to provide immediate relief, but, more importantly, we help people look at their situation and see where they could make changes to become more stable. We help our guests create an individual plan and support them as they work toward financial stability. We measure our success by getting in touch with clients three months after their last case management visit to assess their situation and how confident they feel about their ability to pay their monthly bills.

2) People will transition from homelessness to housing. Homeless men who are leaving an institutional setting -- whether it's jail, a shelter, or a substance abuse recovery program -- often struggle to manage life on their own. We offer transitional housing and support to help these men make a successful transition into independent living. We measure our success by contacting former residents three months after discharge to find out if they have maintained stable housing.

3) People will secure and maintain lasting employment. Unemployment lies at the core of poverty and robs people of their dignity. We work to equip unemployed men and women for lasting employment and restore their dignity. We measure our success by whether they maintain steady employment six months after finishing our program.

4) People will re-enter the community upon release. Inmates who are leaving incarceration are often ill-equipped to navigate the challenges of returning home. Starting while they are in jail and continuing after they are released, we come alongside men and women to offer the training, guidance and support that they need to make a successful transition back into the community. We measure our success by the number of clients who return to jail or prison within three years of release.

We use several proven strategies throughout our programs to hep our clients move forward, Motivational Interviewing is an evidence-based practice that we use in case management and pastoral counseling to increase clients' intrinsic motivation to make changes in their lives. We also use The Genesis Process, which utilizes cognitive behavioral techniques to help people address self-destructive coping behaviors and make positive changes in their lives. We also work to ensure our services are trauma-informed to prevent re-traumatizing vulnerable clients. In all of our services, we strive to continually learn best practices in our field and employ demonstrated strategies to provide the highest quality of care to our clients.

Founded in 2001, Lexington Rescue Mission has a broad base of support in the community, with 7,400 donors actively supporting the ministry in the last 12 months. Giving has grown an average of 10% annually and has more than doubled in the last 10 years, from $594,692 in 2007 to $1,561,963 in 2017, allowing us to have 20 staff members dedicated to carrying out these strategies effectively.

Our board, staff, and volunteers are committed to excellence and serving according to the highest standards set by our peers, which is why our organization is accredited by the Association of Gospel Rescue Missions (AGRM) and the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA). We were also an early adopter of GoodGiving.net and received a Best Christian Workplaces designation in 2017. Our executive director, Jim Connell, recently finished serving a three-year term as president of the Southern District of AGRM.

We value working with other organizations that have a stake in our clients' success and can help complete the continuum of care needed by our clients. Therefore, we are active members of the Lexington-Fayette Continuum of Care, the Office for Homelessness Prevention and Intervention Advocacy Committee, the Central Kentucky Housing and Homeless Initiative, the Homeless and Housing Coalition of Kentucky, and the ROSM network. We are also members of Kentucky Nonprofit Network, Local First Lexington, and Commerce Lexington.

1) In Outreach Services, we measure clients' progress toward financial security by whether their acute needs were met when they came in for walk-in hours, whether they were made aware of additional services we offer, whether they were referred to another program within the mission, whether those who were referred to another program met with the appropriate staff person, and whether those who met with staff were accepted into that program. We also measure whether guests who create an Individual Development Plan met their goal of being housed or maintaining greater financial stability.

2) At The Potter's House, we track the number of residents receiving transitional housing and key factors that will enable them to live independently once they exit the program, including whether they obtained full-time employment, whether they returned to incarceration, whether they maintained their sobriety, whether they met formally with the chaplain for spiritual care, whether they completed a budget, whether they attended weekly relapse prevention meetings, whether they attended church regularly, whether they attended support groups, and whether they developed a supportive social network.

3) In Employment Services, we track the number of people who are placed in temporary work assignments and permanent jobs. We contact them quarterly to determine whether they have been able to maintain their employment and determine if they need additional support.

4) In Breaking Chains, we track how many men and women attended life-skills classes while they were incarcerated, how many graduated from those classes, how many came to the mission for services after their release, how many created individual re-entry plans with our case worker, how many completed at least one goal in their individual re-entry plan (employment/education, housing, family reunification, mentor, etc.), and how many people with re-entry plans were re-arrested.

1) In 2017, 1,203 people came in for 1,607 visits to The Outreach Center during walk-in hours. Of these clients, 83% of their acute needs were met (clothing, hygiene products, household supplies, etc.). 100% were made aware of additional services the mission offers. Of these 1,203 clients, 200 were referred to another program within the mission, and 88% of them met with the appropriate staff person. Of those 88, 55 were accepted into that program. Nine people expressed interest in case management and, of those individuals, four showed up for their initial appointment and created an Individual Development Plan (IDP). Of those four, they all met their goal of being housed or maintaining greater financial stability.

Additionally, 33 homeless households were evaluated for assistance through our Homeless Intervention Program, and 21 were eligible and entered the program. Twelve obtained housing, four are still seeking housing, and five withdrew from the program. Of those who were housed, four have maintained housing for at least three months and two have maintained housing for six months.

2) In 2017, Lexington Rescue Mission housed 45 men at The Potter's House. Of those men, 69% obtained gainful full-time employment, 98% did not return to incarceration, 82% maintained their sobriety, 46% met formally with the chaplain for spiritual care, 51% completed a budget, 90% attended weekly relapse prevention meetings, 84% attended church regularly, 78% attended support groups, and 59% developed a supportive social network.

3) In 2017, we employed 56 job-seekers in 103 temporary assignments through our staffing service, Advance Lexington, and 74% of them are still employed or continue to work on at least a part-time/as-needed basis. We also placed 40 job-seekers directly in permanent jobs, and 72% of them were still working after the first quarter of 2018.

4) In 2017, 329 people attended our life-skill classes while incarcerated, and 118 graduated from them. Additionally, 116 men and women met with our case manager for 442 visits after their release. Of those 116 people, 89 completed at least one of their goals in their re-entry plan (housing, employment, family reunification, etc.). Of these 89 clients, five recidivated and returned to incarceration.

External Reviews

Awards & Accreditations

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA)

Affiliations & Memberships

Association of Gospel Rescue Missions (AGRM)

Photos

Financials

LEXINGTON RESCUE MISSION INC

Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2017 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity