ENGINEERING WORLD HEALTH

Saving Equipment is Saving Lives

aka Engineering World Health   |   Durham, NC   |  www.ewh.org

Mission

To inspire,educate,and empower the biomedical community to improve health care delivery in the developing world.

Ruling year info

2002

CEO

Dr. Tojan B Rahhal Ph.D.

Main address

4819 Emperor Blvd Suite 400

Durham, NC 27703 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

62-1868670

NTEE code info

Health Support Services (E60)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Student Exchange and Aid (Q22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hospitals in low-income countries face large challenges accessing skilled technicians who can install, maintain, or repair medical equipment. As a result, equipment essential to diagnosing diseases, sterilizing tools, and performing surgery quickly falls out of service. Without working equipment, physicians and nurses are unable to deliver quality health care, and patients suffer. In 2001, engineering professors Bob Malkin and Mohammad Kiani established Engineering World Health to help hospitals overcome this challenge.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

BMET Training

Our Biomedical Equipment Technician Training program builds local, cooperative, and sustainable education programs in nations which lack adequately trained hospital technicians or engineers. We work with each country's ministry of health and existing educational institutions to ensure that such programs will receive the necessary support and funding they will need after we leave. Along with training technicians, EWH also trains future trainers who will take over as the educational leaders and experts in biomedical technology once they complete the program. Our goal is to build a global community of well-trained BMETs, thus improving access to healthcare around the world.

Population(s) Served
Adults

EWH Institute programs train university STEM students and professionals, then place these participants in hospitals to repair equipment and share their knowledge with local hospital staff. The Institutes aim to provide participants with the opportunity to become immersed in healthcare systems in low income countries, working with hospital staff to improve access to functioning medical equipment. Our trainings focus on improving specific technical knowledge while teaching participants how to best communicate and work effectively in low-resource, cross-cultural environments.

Population(s) Served
Students
Young adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to increase awareness, initiate training and impact global health by 1) Improving the quality of healthcare in resource poor communities of Africa, Central America and Asia, 2) Providing a learning experience that gives insights to the challenges of operating and maintaining healthcare technology in the developing world, 3) Creating a cross-cultural learning experience that shows the joys and challenges of working in a different culture by providing basic operation and repair training of medical equipment to professionals and technicians in the developing world, and 4) Encouraging the development of low-cost technologies directed at the needs of developing country healthcare.

Through the BMET Training program, EWH increases the availability of trained biomedical equipment technicians in low-income countries, who are then able to maintain and repair medical equipment in their countries' hospitals. EWH works with a country's Ministry of Health and a local educational partner to ensure the training program can exist independently of EWH and continue training BMETs after our programs end.

Through EWH's Institute programs, EWH trains university STEM students and young professionals to work as volunteers in low-resource hospitals. Through intense technical training and study of the language and culture, participants gain deep insight into how their program countries' healthcare systems work and how medical equipment works (or doesn't) in low-resource settings. During this time, they work alongside local hospital staff, exchanging knowledge and training.

EWH has extensive experience working in low-resource medical settings. Two of our staff are biomedical engineers who have both participated in our Institute programs and spent extended amounts of time on the ground in the countries in which we work. Additionally, EWH has developed many close connections with university partners, local educational partners, ministries of health, and local hospitals.

EWH has established sustainable, independent, accredited BMET Training programs in Honduras, Rwanda, and Nigera. We also completed programs in Cambodia and Ethiopia.

EWH's Institute programs, since 2004, have seen over 1,200 participants repair more than 13,000 pieces of hospital equipment, worth an estimated $26 million. The equipment they repair ranges from blood pressure cuffs to hospital beds, from aspirators to ultrasound machines, from autoclaves to incubators. Additionally, these participants have taken on a wide variety of secondary projects to leave their hospitals with tangible improvements, including organizing and improving BMET workshops, building play areas for pediatric wards, and supplying difficult-to-find spare parts. Our Institute programs have expanded rapidly in the last few years, and we hope to reach even more countries in the years to come.

Financials

ENGINEERING WORLD HEALTH
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ENGINEERING WORLD HEALTH

Board of directors
as of 3/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michael Tracey

Cathy Peck

Mohammad Kiani

Temple University

Sreeram Dhurjaty

University of Rochester

Mhoire Murphy

Corinna Lathan

William Gannon

Barbara Grenell

Eric Nodiff

Mark Goldman

Jessica Feddersen

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Middle Eastern
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data