PLATINUM2023

Feeding the Gulf Coast

aka Bay Area Food Bank   |   Theodore, AL   |  http://www.feedingthegulfcoast.org

Mission

As a member of Feeding America, and a United Way Member Agency, Feeding the Gulf Coast works through member organizations and special programs to provide nutritious food to meet the challenge of feeding people who are hungry as a result of systemic poverty, personal crisis or disaster. Feeding the Gulf Coast also educates the public regarding domestic hunger, proper nutrition and other related issues.

Ruling year info

1982

President & CEO

Michael Ledger

Main address

5248 Mobile South Street

Theodore, AL 36582 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

63-0821997

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hunger affects 1 in 8 people in the United States and Puerto Rico. Along the central Gulf Coast of Alabama, Mississippi and Florida, over 350,000 people, including more than 101,000 children, face hunger throughout the year. This equates to 1 in 6 people, including 1 in 4 children. By partnering with community organizations to provide meals, emergency food, nutrition education, and benefits enrollment assistance to families facing hardship, we can meet the needs of food insecure children, families, and seniors in our community. Together, we can solve the problem of local hunger.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Retail Store Level Pickup Program

The Retail Store Level Pickup Program gives the food bank and its agencies access to fresh foods such as produce, dairy, meat and bread. The program, created on the national level by Feeding America, partners retail grocery chains with local food banks. When stores have product that is nearing its expiration date, they pull it from the shelves and instead of disposing of it, they donate it to their local food bank.

Population(s) Served
Low-income people

Distributes thousands of pounds of food to convenient locations throughout our service area to serve 100 households or more on a single day. Mobile Pantry distributions take place in all 24 counties of our service area and are instrumental in providing emergency food to families following disasters such as Hurricane Michael.

Population(s) Served
Low-income people

Feeding the Gulf Coast, working through member agencies and special programs, provides nutritious food to meet the challenge of feeding people who are huntry as a result of personal crisis or disaster.  Member agencies come to pickup food from the food bank's 39,000 square foot warehouse in Theodore, AL and our 15,000 square food warehouse in Milton, FL

Population(s) Served
Low-income people

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, is a federal program that helps families and individuals afford groceries. Feeding the Gulf Coast’s SNAP Outreach Program works with community organizations and volunteers to reach households struggling with hunger who qualify for SNAP (Food Stamps), but are faced with barriers that keep them from participating in the application process.

Our team can complete applications for clients, and submit to the food stamp offices on their behalf. They will also work with clients to identify proper paperwork needed for caseworker interviews.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors
Low-income people
Ex-offenders

During the summer, many children don't have access to free/reduced lunch. To help fill this gap, we offer the Summer Food Service Program funded by the USDA.
Sites involved in this program serve breakfast, lunch, and/or snacks to children in their community. The communities where the sites are located have at least 50% or more of familes who are eligible for the free or reduced lunch at their school.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The food bank’s Afterschool Snack Program provides free meals and snacks to low-income children through a variety of community locations where children already congregate during the afterschool hours—such as Boys and Girls Clubs, churches or public schools. In addition to providing meals to kids, the program also promotes a safe place, where under the supervision of trustworthy staff, a child can get involved in educational, recreational and social activities. The program also offers nutrition education throughout the school year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The food bank provides nutritious and easy-to-prepare food for children to take home on weekends when other resources are not available. This program is entirely funded through grants and private donations.

Backpacks are filled with enough food for six meals and two snacks. The typical backpack contains a variety of child-friendly, easy to prepare food at a cost of approximately $4 per backpack.

The children are identified by teachers and school counselors as having little to no food in their home, the children remain anonymous to the food bank and their donors.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The food bank transitions immediately into disaster relief mode when a storm hits our service area. Following the storm, we work with our food pantries and meal programs to begin response and recovery efforts. We continue providing relief long after other recovery efforts have ended.

We coordinate efforts with local Emergency Management Agencies and state food bank associations to ensure unduplicated, efficient and timely relief.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Low-income people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America 1986

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Retail Store Level Pickup Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Fewer pounds of food were rescued through our Retail Store Level Pickup Program in 2020 due to declining food supply at the retail store level.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This represents all of our food distribution efforts as pounds divided by 1.2, the standard USDA meal conversion factor, to show the number of meals provided.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

2020 External Goals

1. Reduce food insecurity by providing 17,500,000 meals, distributing at least 21 million pounds of food. Continue using SNAP assistance hotline and benefit enrollment center to complete applications over the phone to meet the needs of clients throughout AL and MS, and target seniors throughout AL and MS to expand the benefits we offer to low-income seniors. Continue to relieve food insecurity by freeing up resources seniors have previously used on other needs. Support CSFP efforts in AL.

2. Continue to reduce transportation expenses by efficiently utilizing newer trucks in our fleet, seek funding opportunities to replace aged trucks, maintain a consistent preventative maintenance program, and seek further efficiency in routing. The goal is to have a 5% reduction in transportation expenses.

3. Identify high need areas for Afterschool Meal expansion. Distribute 800,000 snacks, 90,000 suppers, and 2,500 breakfast meals during the school year. Continue to grow the backpack program in all three states.

4. Continue to partner with the Department of Agriculture, farmers and community organizations to expand gleaning opportunities, build relationships with farmers and other sources of produce, and increase nutrition related outreach and awareness events.

5. Continue to partner with health professionals to expand education classes related to nutrition and cooking for adults and children as part of an overall focus on hunger and nutrition's impact on health and learning as well as develop and distribute healthy food boxes to clients.

6. Continue to expand brand awareness and fundraising activities to ensure continued transition to our new name, Feeding the Gulf Coast, and ensure strong community engagement to support facility expansions and utilizations, core operations, and special programs.

7. Continue to utilize advisory committees, board members, and community leaders in each state. Expand board involvement to increase awareness of our mission through fundraising events to help build long-term financial stability.

8. Through the MPIN committee, focus on transitioning our red counties to green to ensure we are meeting the need throughout our service area. Have 22 of our 24 counties green by the end of 2020. Continue to improve food quality and standardization of our mobile pantries.

Distributing food across 24 counties along the Central Gulf Coast requires efficient logistics and a reliable transportation fleet. Feeding the Gulf Coast is always reevaluating routes and methods to cut down on transportation costs, while increasing the pounds delivered to each community. By combining SNAP and Benefits Enrollment Outreach with food distribution events, the food bank can achieve two goals with one transportation route: provide emergency food access and help individuals secure assistance through SNAP and other budget-relieving benefits.

To further reduce costs and maximize consumption of valuable food, Feeding the Gulf Coast is encouraging agency partners to pick up food donations directly from nearby grocery stores for direct distribution to clients, while saving the food bank the expense of picking up retail store donations and moving the product through its warehouses in Milton, FL or Theodore, AL.

The food bank's strategy to expand and strengthen child nutrition programs is two-fold: build relationships at the community level and advocate for policy changes at the federal level. Full-time child nutrition staff have been retained to operate in Alabama, Florida and Mississippi, developing partners in rural areas to host Summer Meals and Afterschool Meals sites. At the federal level, the food bank is advocating policy changes that will streamline the reporting for each federal program, eliminating redundancies and reducing expenses.

Feeding the Gulf Coast has two warehouses, which, combined, can hold 3 million pounds of food at a time. Cold storage areas can hold up to 20 tractor trailer loads and the freezers can hold 15 tractor trailer loads. The main warehouse, in Theodore, AL and the panhandle warehouse, in Milton, FL, are equipped with emergency generators to protect food from spoiling during power outages. A fleet of 11 refrigerated trucks picks up and distributes food across the 24-county service area.

In January 2016, the food bank acquired a third facility in Gulfport, MS, which will provide space for offices, a training/conference room and dry good storage. This new space will allow us to expand our programs in Mississippi.

Feeding the Gulf Coast has 72 full-time employees and 6 part-time employees. The organization could not distribute more than 34 million pounds of food annually without the support of volunteers. In 2022, over 22,000 volunteers contributed more than 210,000 service hours to the food bank.

Feeding the Gulf Coast has earned a reputation both on local and national levels and has been able to make its programs sustainable by program branding and increasing awareness of hunger in our community. Experience has shown that once adopted, finding local support for continuing programs among businesses and the faith-based community is available.

Feeding the Gulf Coast also has a board approved Development Committee, which guides our fundraising efforts and has helped implement several giving programs. The food bank has a monthly giving program and has implemented a lifetime donor recognition program. Participants of both programs receive special recognition in newsletters, the annual report and a wall mural. The food bank also has a planned giving program with local financial advisors providing materials to donors sharing the economic benefits of planned gifts as part of their estate planning. The food bank manages a robust direct mail campaign program with over 10,000 active donors.

Since establishment in 1981, Feeding the Gulf Coast has distributed more than 280 million pounds of food and has met the needs of communities during times of disaster. In 2018, after Hurricane Michael swept destruction through the southeastern United States, Feeding the Gulf Coast responded immediately with water, food and other resources to disaster areas in the Panhandle of Florida.

The Retail Store Level Pickup Program gives the food bank and its agencies access to fresh foods such as produce, dairy, meat and bread. The program, created on the national level by Feeding America, partners retail grocery chains with local food banks. In 2020, 185 stores along the Central Gulf Coast donated more than 11.5 million pounds of food to the food bank through this program.

Our SNAP and Benefits Outreach Program began in 2010 with the signing of a contract to conduct SNAP Outreach on behalf of the Alabama Department of Human Resources throughout Alabama. In 2014, the food bank expanded SNAP Outreach work into Mississippi by contracting with the Mississippi Department of Human Services. Both state programs cover 50% of the expenses needed to perform outreach. In 2020, the SNAP Outreach team helped more than 6,900 families gain access to SNAP and other benefits.

Since the first child nutrition program began in 2003, these programs have continued to expand and now include over 160 Afterschool Meals and Summer Meals Program sites, which support over 13,000 children. The food bank also supports approximately 5,400 children through a school-based Backpack Program providing at risk children with food for the weekend.

Feeding the Gulf Coast has been successful in implementing programs and meeting food distribution goals in urban parts of the service area; however, rural communities present a different challenge. Population density in rural communities is lower and more spread out, creating the challenge of finding a central location from which to distribute food and conduct programs. Serving these counties is also more expensive, requiring more staff time and more miles on delivery trucks, while also facing limited funding opportunities due to the limited presence of businesses and foundations in rural areas.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Feeding the Gulf Coast
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Feeding the Gulf Coast

Board of directors
as of 09/01/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Michael Holland

Bryant Bank

Term: 2025 - 2023


Board co-chair

Chad Brown

Thompson Engineering

Term: 2023 - 2025

Michael Holland

Bryant Bank

Derrick Williams

Williams & Associates

Chad Brown

Thompson Engineering

Jorge Cancel

Titan Homes

Debbie Floyd

Coastal Alabama Community College

Michael Hollis

Southeast Toyota Finance

Rufus Hudson

Regions Bank

Valerie James

VisionSpot Consulting Group, LLC

Willson McClelland

The First, A National Banking Association

Lee Tuemer

Hy-Grade Valve Inc.

Rachel Holland

United Bank

Alec Naman

Naman's Catering

Brad Hicks

Stone Crosby, P.C.

John Merting

Law Offices of John W. Merting, P.A.

Doug Whitmore

Wells Fargo Advisors

John Merting

Law Offices of John W. Merting, PA

Errol Crook

Physician

Dorothy Shaw

Retired

Barbara Peters

Start Living

Ricardo Woods

Burr Foreman

Danielle Clay-MaGee

Woodforest National Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/3/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/01/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.