Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

TOGETHER We CAN Solve Hunger.

aka Community Food Bank of Central Alabama   |   Birmingham, AL   |  www.feedingAL.org

Mission

The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow.

Ruling year info

1983

Interim CEO

Nicole Williams

Main address

107 Walter Davis Dr.

Birmingham, AL 35209 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

United Way Community Food Bank

EIN

63-0837956

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hunger and health are deeply connected, and interventions are needed for community health and well-being. But when people do not have enough food or must choose inexpensive foods with low-nutritional value, it can seriously impact their health. The Community Food Bank works to eliminate barriers to fresh, nutritious food. Feeding America estimates there were 224,920 individuals in our service area who experienced food insecurity at some point during the year 2018; before the pandemic. To meet this need, 45,661,684 lbs of food would be needed annually. In 2020, Feeding America estimated that the number of individuals in need increased to 273,340. To meet this need, 55,491,573 lbs of food is needed annually. In Central Alabama 1 in 4 children and 1 in 6 adults experience hunger on a regular basis.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Feeding Neighbors in Need

We believe no one should go hungry and that there is a solution to the problem of hunger in Alabama. The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We serve 12 counties in central Alabama: Jefferson, Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Clay, Cleburne, Etowah, Talladega, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker and Winston Counties. In 2020, we distributed over 21.9 million lbs. of food to over 428,400 unique individuals.
We accomplish our mission by providing food to over 260 partner agencies, including food pantries, shelters, and children’s programs, who offer direct service to our neighbors in need. To fill the gaps, both geographically and demographically, we also offer programs to serve specific populations vulnerable to hunger. Together through our partner agencies and direct service programs, we can solve hunger!

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Social and economic status
Health
Ethnic and racial groups

Our Kids Cafe provides front-line service to kids and teens who are food insecure. The program, coordinated through the Alabama Food Bank Association, offers meals to low-income students under the age of 18 who typically rely on school meals. Our program provides nutritious meals that includes produce sourced from local growers. We partner with community organizations, such as YMCA’s and Boys and Girls Clubs, to provide meals throughout the summer months and afterschool. We believe these meals are an integral solution to fighting hunger and creating a healthier generation of future leaders. Our 2021 summer feeding program served 1,705 unduplicated children, 111,506 meals and 133,807 lbs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our Mobile Pantries make healthy food accessible by bringing food pantries directly to areas of need. The food at these distributions is nutritious and varied, and we aim to provide meat, fruit, vegetables, and dairy. These distributions are contact-free, drive up opportunities; we follow a “Truck to Trunk” model. There is no income requirement or identification needed due to current government waivers, and you are welcome to carpool. Each adult in the car qualifies to get a household food box. In 2020, this program served 5,443 unduplicated individuals and 332,312 meals at 48 distributions. We also offered 383 special distributions with community partners and through the USDA Farmers to Families program for COVID-19 relief serving an additional 124,977 unduplicated individuals 3,211,269 meals in 2020.

Population(s) Served

During times of crisis, the Community Food Bank is ready to step in and provide emergency assistance when and where needed most. We provide emergency food and water in times of crisis like tornadoes or floods, establish temporary emergency food pantries in affected communities, and work with our network of agency partners to support the community. We work in concert with the Emergency Management Association (EMA) to help when and where it is most needed. Often our role is to support the community for the long term, in the months following a disaster, after the first responders and one-time donations are gone.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Religious groups
Social and economic status

In partnership with the Alabama Department of Education and USDA, the CFB administers the Commodities Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), a program to address senior hunger. We provide special food boxes geared toward senior-specific health needs, through 18 partner agencies and 25 distribution sites. Some sites have special senior-only distributions or deliver to the home-bound. In 2020, this program served 1,623 unduplicated individuals with 372,396 meals.
In addition, our Benefits Enrollment Center helps eligible low-income seniors and people with disabilities find and enroll in benefits programs. We help clients put money towards necessities like prescriptions, insurance, and housing costs. Our SNAP Outreach Coordinator helps seniors navigate the application process and determine qualifying benefits. Over the past year, there were 548 applicants in our 12-county service area, which translates to 445,305 meals provided through SNAP benefits.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Nearly one in four children in this region lives in a food insecure household. The Family Market model provides food for the family, reaching all the children in the home. We work with teachers, counselors, and school administrators to facilitate these Family Market distributions monthly at our partner schools. Family Markets are food pantries on wheels that deliver fresh fruits, vegetables, and other staples in a ‘just in time’ model; food is delivered and distributed the same day. Our Family Market Program started in Fall 2016 and has continued during the interruption in regular school schedules caused by the pandemic. Our delivery sites include 17 schools and target communities without access to healthy food choices. In 2020, this program served 280,673 meals to 5,096 unduplicated individuals at 105 distributions.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Social and economic status
Religious groups
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Social and economic status
Religious groups

Where we work

Awards

Community Partner of the Year 2015

Junior League of Birmingham

Living Our Values Award 2019

Feeding America

Shcweitzer Fellow Outstanding Community Mentor Award 2019

Albert Shcweitzer Fellowship

Non-Profit Organization of the Year 2019

Les Dames d'Escoffier, Birmingham

Nonprofit of the Year, Category 2 2010

Birmingham Business Allaince

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Health, Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Religious groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We serve 12 counties in central Alabama.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We believe no one should go hungry and that there is a solution to the problem of hunger in Alabama. The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We serve 12 counties in central Alabama: Jefferson, Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Clay, Cleburne, Etowah, Talladega, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker and Winston Counties. In 2020, we distributed over 21.9 million lbs. of food to over 428,400 unique individuals.
We accomplish our mission by providing food to over 260 partner agencies, including food pantries, shelters, and children’s programs, who offer direct service to our neighbors in need. To fill the gaps, both geographically and demographically, we also offer programs to serve specific populations vulnerable to hunger. Together through our partner agencies and direct service programs, we can solve hunger!

Agency Network of Partners – Across our 12-county footprint, the Community Food Bank partners with over 260 agencies, including soup kitchens, shelters, church food pantries, children’s programs, and veterans’ programs to get food into the hands of our neighbors. We provide them with food safety training and supply food, and they distribute it free of charge to our neighbors in need. Our partner agencies provided over 15,724,248 lbs. of food to 1,694,018 individuals during 2020.
Mobile Pantries – These distributions are contact-free, drive up opportunities; we follow a “Truck to Trunk” model. There is no income requirement or identification needed due to current government waivers, and you are welcome to carpool. In 2020, this program served 5,443 unduplicated individuals and 332,312 meals at 48 distributions. We also offered 383 special distributions with community partners and through the USDA Farmers to Families program for COVID-19 relief serving an additional 124,977 unduplicated individuals 3,211,269 meals in 2020.
Family Markets – We work with teachers, counselors, and school administrators to facilitate these Family Market distributions monthly at our partner schools. Family Markets are food pantries on wheels that deliver fresh fruits, vegetables, and other staples in a ‘just in time’ model; food is delivered and distributed the same day. Our delivery sites include 17 schools and target communities without access to healthy food choices. In 2020, this program served 280,673 meals to 5,096 unduplicated individuals at 105 distributions.
Kids Cafe – Our Kids Cafe provides front-line service to kids and teens who are food insecure. The program, coordinated through the Alabama Food Bank Association, offers meals to low-income students under the age of 18 who typically rely on school meals. We partner with community organizations, such as YMCA’s and Boys and Girls Clubs, to provide meals throughout the summer months and afterschool programs.
Senior Hunger – In partnership with the Alabama Department of Education and USDA, the CFB administers the Commodities Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), a program to address senior hunger. We provide special food boxes geared toward senior-specific health needs, through 18 partner agencies and 25 distribution sites. Some sites have special senior-only distributions or deliver to the home-bound. In 2020, this program served 1,623 unduplicated individuals with 372,396 meals.
Disaster Relief – We provide emergency food and water in times of crisis like tornadoes or floods, establish temporary emergency food pantries in affected communities, and work with our network of agency partners to support the community. We work in concert with the Emergency Management Association (EMA) to help when and where it is most needed. Often our role is to support the community for the long term, in the months following a disaster, after the first responders and one-time donations are gone.

The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama operates as a food distribution center. We receive products from several food industry sources, as well as excess food reclaimed from local grocery stores and community donations. In turn, we distribute that food to over 260 nonprofits in the community who act as our agency partners. The agencies receive food from the Community Food Bank and distribute that food to those in need.
We do not distribute food directly from our facility, but we operate several public food distributions and meal programs to ensure that the needs of especially vulnerable populations are met. When we identify a gap, either geographically or demographically, that leaves specific populations vulnerable to hunger, we operate direct meal programs that foster healthy food access for those at risk of hunger.

We believe no one should go hungry and that there is a solution to the problem of hunger in Alabama. The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We serve 12 counties in central Alabama: Jefferson, Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Clay, Cleburne, Etowah, Talladega, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker and Winston Counties. In 2020, we distributed over 21.9 million lbs. of food to over 428,400 unique individuals.

Financials

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mary Alice Kline

Iberia/First Horizons Bank

William Owens

Owens Landscape Group

Ellie Taylor

Alabama Grocers' Association

George Bradford

Mrs. Statton's Salads

Ed Goodwin

Mary Alice Kline

Iberia Bank

David Wood

Wood Fruitticher

David Bell

C&S Foods

Khalilah Brown

Jefferson County Health Department

Susana Schuler

Hearst Media, WVTM13

Brad Jones

Cushman Wakefield

Bill Kreis

JohnsonKreis Construction

Alyson Tucker

Alabama Power

Robert Record

Christ Health Services

Joseph Ritchey

Dentons Sirote

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/22/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/05/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.