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HISPANIC INTEREST COALITION OF ALABAMA

aka ¡HICA!   |   Birmingham, AL   |  www.hicaalabama.org

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Mission

¡HICA! is a community development and advocacy organization that champions economic equality, civic engagement, and social justice for Latinos families in Alabama. ¡HICA! envisions an Alabama in which everyone has full and equal participation in our state's civic, cultural, social, and economic life. Hispanic and immigrant families are empowered to integrate, engage, and lead their communities to reach their families' aspirations.

Ruling year info

2000

Chief Executive Officer

Carlos Enrique Alemán Ph.D.

Main address

117 Southcrest Drive

Birmingham, AL 35209 USA

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EIN

63-1225764

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Family Services (P40)

Economic Development (S30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Economic Development Program - CED

The Community Economic Development Program promotes financial stability and asset building. Many of our constituents are unbanked individuals without access to standard loans, credit scores, and credit history. CED has helped many constituents to reach out to better lives by either opening their businesses or learning how to navigate the systems and access available possibilities. In 2021, this program filed 252 Taxes, provided technical assistance and access to loans for business ownership or first-time homeownership to aspiring and existing entrepreneurs and home buyers, including 557 technical assistance sessions to 165 unique entrepreneurs; provided access to capital to 7 participants lending a total of $53,700, provided counseling for 92 first-time homebuyers, assisting 87 unique participants in housing services and providing 188 counseling sessions to unique participants. A total of 8 participants became homeowners.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Heterosexuals
LGBTQ people
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants

The Empowering Communities Program works to develop civically engaged individuals in a socially just community through organizing and leadership development. Moreover, it conducts programs designed for youth Latinx to access higher education by increasing graduation rates, college admissions, and further success in the workforce.
In 2021, this program assisted 180 individuals and their families. The college readiness program reached 62 students through 33 sessions in the Escalera project including 21 FAFSA completed and approved applications ($341,969 awarded). ¡HICA! awarded three $1,000 scholarships to Hispanic youth accepted into colleges. ECP conducted relevant work efforts on Voter registration and education about the importance to vote, reaching 951 individuals through posts, social media, and educational presentations. The program is leading the workforce development initiative geared to assist Hispanics to succeed in being prepared for and competitive to access good-paying job

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Heterosexuals
LGBTQ people
Low-income people
Immigrants

The Citizenship and Immigration Program provides legal immigration services with information, guidance, and benefits, with assistance to those on the path to citizenship and other immigration needs, including Naturalization to those who are eligible. In 2021, this program provided case screenings to 960 individuals (690 families) presenting options for immigration benefits; filed 51 naturalization applications with 35 approved, 2 denied, and 14 pending, filed 13 humanitarian visa applications (visas for victims of hardship/crimes), 13 Green card applications, and 50 new and 177 renewal DACA applications. These services reached 56 counties in AL and 20 other states.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Heterosexuals
LGBTQ people
Low-income people
Immigrants

The Strong Families Program, ¡HICA!'s gateway program, provides information, referrals, and services that support families in times of crisis.
In 2021, this program provided 2,135 direct constituent services through Family advocacy (226 families); assisted 465 individuals (victims of crimes) through Victim advocacy; filed 35 PFAs for victims of crime; sustained a weekly support group for victims of crimes; provided 394 mental health counseling sessions to 72 constituents, provided 7 presentations related to Language Access and Cultural Humility, and distributed 985 printed informational flyers. Constituents from 40 AL counties were served.
This program led HICA’s initiative on the Emergency Assistance Fund created in March of 2020 to assist client's needs as the result of the Covid-19 pandemic. By the end of 2021, ¡HICA! had deployed $259,919 to 875 families, including 1,801 individual household members, 958 children under the age of 19, and 142 single parents’ households, all residen

Population(s) Served
Families
People of Latin American descent
Heterosexuals
LGBTQ people
Immigrants

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HICA! amplifies the voices of immigrant communities in Alabama helping them achieve economic equality, social justice, and improved quality of life. Core programs include Empowering Communities, Strong Families, Community Economic Development, and Citizenship & Immigration.

Founded in 1999, HICA! is the largest and most robust organization of its kind in Alabama. Focused on serving low-income Hispanic and immigrant families, HICA!s programs move families out of poverty through a range of services from basic assistance to community development, college and workforce readiness, citizenship/ visa renewal, access to loans, financial education, and small business development. HICA! has facilitated launching 234 small/independent businesses, provided more than 20 scholarships to colleges and trade schools, assisted with 2,107 immigration applications, helped 30 families to become homeowners, and has assisted an average of 30 families per year secure domestic violence orders of protection.

As an organization designed for, and staffed by, Hispanic and immigrant professionals, HICA! serves approximately 3,500 individuals and families each year. Because the staff and leadership reflect the communities we serve, we understand that constituents find it easier to approach our organization seeking assistance and they are more comfortable requesting support. Programs and services are provided in a bilingual/bicultural environment. Our programs strengthen immigrant families and build communities that educate and support their constituents as they learn to navigate and integrate a new environment. While HICA! has historically served Hispanics and immigrants across Alabama; our footprint has increased significantly since 2020 when programs pivoted to online/virtual platforms because of the pandemic. We now have constituents in more than 41 counties and 11 states, and we have served immigrants from 27 countries.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

HISPANIC INTEREST COALITION OF ALABAMA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HISPANIC INTEREST COALITION OF ALABAMA

Board of directors
as of 01/14/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Tiffany Kahlon

The Kahlon Group

Term: 2023 - 2024

Ralph Williams

Alabama Power Company

Andy Hernandez

Regions Bank

Pam Cook

Coca-Cola Bottling Company United

Carlos Izcaray

Alabama Symphony Orchestra

Tiffany Kahlon

The Kahlon Network

Kary Wolfe

Jones Walker, LLO

Amanda Loper

David Baker Architects

Bob Dickerson

BAR/BBRC/NCRC

Vanessa Vargas

Latino News Alabama

Robert Rodriguez

Taco Mama, LLC

Mary Andrews Carlisle

Vulcan Materials Company

Meredith Calhoun

Tessa Commercial Real Estate, LLC

Bertha Hidalgo

UAB School of Public Health

Bing Edwards

Fortif Law Partners, LLC

Ian Cooley

Spire Inc.

Deivid Delgado

Royal Cup Coffee and Tea

Michael Eady

Knight Eady

James Cason

Warren Averett LLC

Amanda Storey

Jones Valley Teaching Farm

Michele Jenkins Utomi

PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.

Becky Carpenter

Opportunity Alabama

Aaron Limonthas

Shipt

Jose Medina

Adios Bar

Louis Mendez

Bressler

Doyle Williams

Protective

Dulce Rivera

Mi Pueblo Supermarket

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/14/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/14/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.