NATIONAL CENTER FOR WOMEN AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

The idea you don't have is the voice you haven't heard.

aka NCWIT   |   Boulder, CO   |  https://www.ncwit.org/

Mission

The National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) is a non-profit community that convenes, equips, and unites change leader organizations to increase the meaningful participation of all women — at the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, age, sexual orientation, and disability status — in the influential field of computing, particularly in terms of innovation and development. NCWIT is the only national non-profit focused on women's participation in computing across the entire ecosystem, supplying change leaders from more than 1,100 organizations with resources to recruit, retain, and advance women from K-12 and higher education through industry and entrepreneurial careers by providing support, evidence, and action.

Ruling year info

2004

CEO and Co-Founder

Lucinda Sanders

President and CTO

Terry Hogan

Main address

1909 26th Street, Second Floor

Boulder, CO 80302 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0591481

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Leadership Development (W70)

Women's Studies (V32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Computing permeates every aspect of our society, creating a high demand for technological innovations that change how we think, connect, conduct research, build products, and more. This demand drives the economy and creates a direct impact on the job market; the U.S. Department of Labor estimates 1.1 million computing-related job openings in the U.S. by 2024, but more than two-thirds of these jobs could go unfilled due to the insufficient pool of college graduates with computing related degrees. Computing underpins every other STEM discipline as a highly versatile and sought-after skill set that is essential in today’s information economy. Even though computing jobs offer some of the highest salaries available, we’re failing to make computing education accessible to all and attract diverse talent to the discipline. Additionally, women already employed in the technology industry are leaving at staggering rates, so we’re not keeping diverse talent either.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing and NCWIT AspireIT

NCWIT Aspirations in Computing (AiC) changes what's possible for women in technology from K-12 through career by offering the kind of encouragement that combats isolation, enables long-term persistence, opens doors, and changes lives. AiC uses program elements that spark interest in computing (AspireIT); recognizes and celebrates women's technical aspirations and abilities, as well as the educators who support them (AiC Award Recognitions); and, provides an expansive, supportive network (AiC Community).

NCWIT AspireIT Peer-led Computing Education is designed to teach K-12 girls programming fundamentals and computational thinking in fun, creative, and hands-on environments. Participants are K-12 girls who want to learn computing from leaders who are AiC Community members who want to "give back" to younger girls and learn valuable leadership skills and receive mentoring from organizations that want to partner with an AiC Community member to bring AspireIT to their community.

NCWIT AiC Award Recognitions offer three distinct awards that honor aspirations, abilities, technical accomplishments, and influential guidance.
The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing is for 9th-12th grade students who self-identify as women, genderqueer, or non-binary. The NCWIT Collegiate Award is for students who are enrolled in a post-secondary institution (community college, college, or university) with a major or minor in a computing or engineering discipline, and also self-identify as women, genderqueer, or non-binary. The NCWIT AiC Educator Award is for formal and informal 9th-12th grade educators.

The NCWIT AiC Community is a phenomenal network for technical women in computing and engineering who receive benefits such as private invitations to virtual and in-person meetups, visibility for technical achievements, computing outreach opportunities, hands-on activities for exploring computer science concepts, exclusive access to scholarships, internships, job opportunities, and more. Participants include 9th-12th grade students who received an Award for AiC and students who are enrolled in a post-secondary institution (community college, college, or university) with a major or minor in a computing or engineering discipline, and also self-identify as women, genderqueer, or non-binary.

Population(s) Served

NCWIT Pacesetters is a unique fast-track program where company and university leaders work together to increase their organization's number of technical women at an accelerated pace over two years. NCWIT Pacesetters employ innovative methods and set quantifiable goals to recruit untapped talent pools of technical women who would otherwise pursue non-computing careers or be at risk of leaving the industry. Since 2010, NCWIT Pacesetters have added and retained over 3,500 women in technology. Pacesetters also work
 together to create national
 action platforms that give 
other organizations 
motivation and infrastructure to mobilize 
their own change efforts.


“Change doesn’t just happen. Having goals, a strategic focus, key company stakeholders involved, and a strong NCWIT team leading the way and pushing a bit from behind is crucial and leads to action! ”
~ NCWIT Pacesetter

Population(s) Served

NCWIT Extension Services (ES) can assist computing departments in making lasting transformations that bring new voices to the table and change what's possible. Using research-based tools, processes, and best practices, the ES approach develops a strategic foundation for increasing women's participation in undergraduate and graduate computing programs. Our resources help academic change agents build consensus and action from the inside out, creating momentum for measurable, sustainable change.

Sustainable change happens when educational systems are revised to fit people, rather than changing people to fit systems that are often biased. Organizational change is by necessity customized, with resources keyed to specific departments and institutions, helping computing faculty strategically reimagine recruitment, retention, and evaluation. Increasing course participation and graduation rates is just part of the story. We help faculty change leaders make lasting, systematic change by securing strategic buy-in and participation from colleagues, department chairs, student affairs, and students themselves. Diversity and inclusion become central to departmental culture, not merely an add-on.

ES works with departments of computing through:
One-on-One Consulting, where a department is individually paired with a specific Extension Services Consultant (ESC)
Learning Circles, which is consulting formed around online learning communities
ES-Grad, which focuses on doctoral computing programs
The interactive diagram of NCWIT's strategic recruitment and retention approach helps faculty members design their own plan.
The FAQ page describes NCWIT's collaborative evaluation tools that help faculty determine how to use scarce resources.
Computing faculty can use the NCWIT Tracking Tool to connect to Academic Alliance members. The online evaluation tool helps academic departments evaluate student recruitment and retention efforts, collecting and charting enrollment and outcome data by major.

NCWIT Extension Services (ES) provides customized consultation to academic departments to help improve their strategic recruitment and retention of women students in their majors. To recognize the achievements of these outstanding departments, NCWIT has established the NCWIT Extension Services Transformation (NEXT) Awards.

The NEXT Awards celebrate past and present ES clients for excellence in recruiting and retaining women in computing education. The awards reflect and reward practices that NCWIT recognizes as having the most significant impact on the long-term goal of increasing the number of women in information technology and other computing-related fields. Departments receiving a NEXT Award show significant positive outcomes in women's enrollment and graduation rates, and have excellent potential for building on these gains. Both small and large departments are encouraged to apply.

Population(s) Served

NCWIT Counselors for Computing (C4C) provides professional school counselors with information and resources they can use to support ALL students as they explore computer science education and careers. C4C is designed to positively influence school counselors' understanding, perceptions, and actions related to computer science education and careers, particularly as it relates to increasing girls' participation in computing. NCWIT offers custom and local professional development around computing education and careers at no cost.

Through C4C, NCWIT offers professional development, ranging in length from one-hour webinars, to one-day workshops, to two-and-a-half-day institutes that include advanced leadership development.

Population(s) Served

Change leaders benefit from engaging with others who are equally committed to the mission of an inclusive tech environment. Listen. Educate. Support. Mobilize. Envision new ways of changing what's possible. Alliances offer collaborative group connections, helping advocates of every size and scale sustain and grow the momentum of inclusion.

NCWIT Academic Alliance: Bringing together more than 2,300 distinguished representatives from more than 550 colleges and universities nationwide, the Academic Alliance (AA) focuses on local barriers to attracting and graduating women in postsecondary computing. By adopting research-based practices, members create a framework to address the human dimensions of the educational setting-small steps that make the classroom a place for everyone. Together, they shape solutions to change socio-educational systems.

NCWIT Affinity Alliance: The work of changing cultures to ensure all technical voices can be heard is done not only in the workplace and the school, but by organizations who support technical women and girls directly. These change leader organizations connect to NCWIT and each other through the Affinity Alliance. Together, these members magnify and multiply their impact by putting NCWIT resources into action and by publicizing their own work and the work of other members of the NCWIT Community. Many organizations share NCWIT's mission of advancing women in technology but aren't directly involved in employing or educating them. Affinity Alliance members are united through new connections, resources, solutions, and support.

NCWIT Entrepreneurial Alliance: Since 2010, the Entrepreneurial Alliance (EA) has focused on small and growing companies with much to gain from intentional cultures of change. We help members build inclusive technical cultures from the ground up, developing research-based strategies for recruiting and advancing technical women. The result: an internal dynamic in which innovation can flourish, powerful new ideas reach the marketplace faster, and team members work to their fullest capabilities. Advance the dynamic in which high-performance ideas flourish. Our research-based strategies help small and growing companies recruit, retain, and advance technical women, bringing new possibilities to the marketplace.

NCWIT K-12 Alliance: The NCWIT K-12 Alliance is dedicated to creating access to an authentic, inclusive computing education for every girl, everywhere. The alliance leverages the influence and diversity of its members to create outreach programs and resources that recruit, retain, and advance more girls into computing nationwide. By working together to make sure every voice is heard, alliance members make a larger and more immediate difference than if they acted alone. Bringing together more than 400 national and local organizations, the alliance serves multiple stakeholders, including girls (and an increasing number of boys) and adult influencers, such as counselors, formal and informal educators, and families. This connected group raises clear solutions that change what's possible and propel diversity and inclusion.

NCWIT Workforce Alliance: The NCWIT Workforce Alliance (WA) focuses on making corporate cultures in technology more inclusive, where every voice is heard and anything is possible. A diverse, inclusive environment enables employees to innovate and do the best work of their lives. NCWIT has the research, data, toolkits, and systematic approach that can help companies of all sizes thrive. Be a force for voices of change. The NCWIT Workforce Alliance focuses on internal corporate cultures to create more inclusive environments, build stronger technical teams, and enhance technical innovation.

Population(s) Served

Sit With Me (SWM) is a fun, creative way to get talking. With its iconic red chair, Sit With Me events allow everyone-men and women, technical and nontechnical-to participate in a meaningful exchange that puts more seats at the table so more voices, and ideas, can be heard. SWM is a national advocacy campaign that celebrates women's contributions to technology through local events. Businesses and post-secondary education institutions use the SWM platform to host dialogues about how technical women are changing what's possible in technology. These events create a safe and open space for teams to reflect on the value of diversity and inclusion while allies get to show their support for women.

When everyone sees the value of what women bring to technology, creating an inclusive environment for women to thrive becomes a shared goal. Open the door, pull up a chair, and host your own Sit With Me event.

“The RED CHAIR (it was so wonderful, it gets capital letters!) was the perfect feature to include. The young ladies got the sense that their passion for technology is truly needed in the world.”
~ Senior Corporate Executive

Population(s) Served

EngageCSEdu is a living collection of peer-reviewed course materials from the CS community. It contains author-submitted materials and those that were "seeded"* via a nationwide search of US colleges and universities with openly available CS1/CS2 materials. All materials that are accepted into the collection make use of at least on "Engagement Practice:" evidence-based practices for engaging all students, including women and underrepresented minorities in computing. Many things influence whether a student chooses to study computing but having a great experience in introductory courses is key.

EngageCSEdu offers:
thousands of unique course materials - including lecture notes, homework assignments, and projects - submitted by faculty nationwide and peer-reviewed by CS educators and experts in student engagement;
a searchable collection for easily locating materials according to knowledge area, programming language, and more;
examples, definitions, and resources related to engagement practices to ensure a more inclusive, appealing learning experience for CS students, including women and other underrepresented groups.

The NCWIT EngageCSEdu Engagement Excellence Awards recognize faculty who are making a difference in their introductory computer science classrooms through excellent and engaging curriculum, contributing the best of the best to the EngageCSEdu collection. EngageCSEdu is a growing, peer-reviewed collection created by faculty across the country that employ a number of "engagement practices" that research suggests are likely to engage students, especially women and other underrepresented groups.

Population(s) Served

TECHNOLOchicas (TC) is a campaign of the NCWIT K-12 Alliance to increase the visibility of Latinas in technology, normalize technology as a career for young Latinas and their families, and provide resources and experiences to highlight pathways into computing. Started as a collaboration with the Televisa Foundation, TECHNOLOchicas launched in 2015 and NCWIT is currently planning for the launch of TECHNOLOchicas 4.0 in late 2019.

“There is a huge space for Latinas to make a difference with their unique diverse backgrounds
in any of the disciplines they choose to focus on.”
~ TECHNOLOchica Janet Barrientos

Population(s) Served

The NCWIT Summit is the world's largest annual convening of Change Leaders for diversity and inclusion in computing. Each May, nearly 1,000 educators, entrepreneurs, corporate executives, and social scientists from across industries and disciplines (men and women) participate in the NCWIT Summit. NCWIT member representatives, notable field experts, and renowned guests present and learn about leading-edge practices, give and receive encouragement, and network and form partnerships.

The NCWIT Summit has been changing the culture for girls and women in technology since 2009.

Population(s) Served

NCWIT provides free, online research-based resources for reform at every level to help individuals implement change, raise awareness, and reach out to critical populations. These resources are frequently cited by national media outlets and widely distributed through outreach events and members' networks.

Whether you're in a classroom or a boardroom, NCWIT can help you kick-start or deepen your inclusive culture. Take advantage of hundreds of free and easy-to-use resources for K-12, higher education, and corporations that support your effort to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and empower action to make sure every voice is heard.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Increase membership base each year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Between 2017 and 2018, NCWIT membership grew 9.7%. *Note: NCWIT members are organizations, not individuals.

Distribute 30-50K resources annually, increase the number of resource downloads.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

NCWIT Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018, NCWIT distributed over 125,000 hardcopy resources and there were 26,474 resource downloads.

Members report organizational changes occurring related to NCWIT membership.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

89% of survey respondents reported that their organization made at least one change related to improving gender diversity, equity, and inclusion in 2018.

Increase the membership of the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At the end of 2018, there were close to 15,000 members of the AiC Community and as of 6/30/2019, there are 16,000 members.

Recognize 2.5-3.5K 9th-12th grade women annually with the NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018, the number of new recipients (girls who had never received the award before) increased by 9%!

Reach over 1,500 K-12 girls annually while funding at least 100 individual programs through peer led NCWIT AspireIT K12 Education opportunities.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018, NCWIT funded 147 AspireIT K12 Education programs, a 28.9% increase over 2017.

Increase the number of Counselors for Computing (C4C) events each year to broaden K12 counselor knowledge of computing degree and career pathways.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018, the 56 events occurred 23 states, reaching 3760 counselors and educators. In 2017, the 52 events occurred in 18 states, reaching 4,477 counselors and educators.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) is a non-profit community of more than 1,200 universities, companies, non-profits, and government organizations nationwide working to increase girls’ and women’s meaningful participation in computing. NCWIT equips change leaders with resources for taking action in recruiting, retaining, and advancing women from K–12 and higher education through industry and entrepreneurial careers.

Before NCWIT was chartered in 2004 by the National Science Foundation, programs focusing on women and computing existed mostly in isolation — without the benefit of shared best practices, effective resources, communication with others, or national reach. Today, these programs are part of the NCWIT community, creating a far greater impact than if institutions acted alone.

The NCWIT Theory of Change identifies the necessary conditions for change, while supporting action that accomplishes sustained reform of social systems. NCWIT puts its Theory into practice through the NCWIT Three-pronged Strategy. The Strategy aims to improve awareness and knowledge, and motivate change leaders to act. Thus, the Strategy works to ensure the necessary “pre-states" in change leaders to make their own individual changes and to initiate organizational changes to bring about sustained systemic change.

Through staff expertise and activities, NCWIT acts as the backbone for coordinating, supporting, and accelerating members' collective impact:

NCWIT convenes: NCWIT brings together men and women change leaders who carry out projects and initiatives in support of NCWIT's mission. They represent more than 1,200 universities, companies, non-profits, and government organizations that are grouped into five Alliances. These change leaders convene annually at the NCWIT Summit — a three-day event where collaboration leads to action and produces positive results for others to follow.

NCWIT equips: NCWIT provides free, online research-based resources for reform at every level to help individuals implement change, raise awareness, and reach out to critical populations. These resources are frequently cited by national media outlets and widely distributed through outreach events and members' networks.

NCWIT unites: NCWIT develops programs for members to achieve goals focused on policy reform, image change, outreach to underrepresented groups, and more. These programs unify change leaders in an action-oriented movement to create national change

Our capabilities include
1) a national membership of over 1,200 change leader organizations
2) a research network of over 25 distinguished gender/computing research scientists
3) 55 full and part time staff
4) support from the National Science Foundation, other major research institutions, and corporations
5) a distinguished Board of Directors

Selected NCWIT nationally evaluated outcomes for 2018 include:

• NCWIT creates research-based resources to spread awareness and increase motivation. NCWIT’s large library of resources was heavily distributed in hard-copy (123,606 resources handed out) in 2018; and there were 26,474 resource downloads.

• NCWIT Communications regularly produces a number of newsletters, which are open to both members and non-members. At the end of 2018, there were 14,277 subscribers (3,825 members and 10,452 non-members) to the various newsletters, a 16% increase from 2017.

• NCWIT’s website continues to see high numbers of unique visitors. In 2018, over 292,412 unique visitors came to the NCWIT website, a whopping 44% increase over 2017. Visitors came from 225 countries and 14,400 cities. About 1 in 10 were returning visitors. There were 858,139 total web page views in 2018, an increase of 18% from last year.

• NCWIT has expanded the national talent pipeline through Aspirations in Computing. In total, more than 50,000 high school women have registered and initiated award applications. During the 2018-2019 award cycle, 3,878 young women were recognized at the national and local level for their computing achievement, a 29% increase over the number of recipients during the last award cycle.

• AspireIT has funded more than 440 programs, providing an estimated 307,482 hours of instruction to 10,042 girls in 43 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands since it started in 2013.

• In 2018 C4C staff, counselor consultants, and volunteers produced or presented at 56 events in 23 states, reaching 3760 counselors and educators for a potential reach to 1,744,640 students.

• NCWIT TECHNOLOchicas has aired public service announcements in over 20 Univision markets nationwide.

• On average, computing departments in post-secondary institutions that have been affiliated with NCWIT for nine to ten years, respectively, witnessed a 10 and 12 percentage point increase in the percent of female declared majors since the institutions first became NCWIT members.

NCWIT has recognized nearly 12,000 9th-12th grade women since 2007 as part of the high school program. Girls of color (not including Asians) make up over 35 percent of the recipients. 90% of Aspirations participants persist in STEM disciplines in post-secondary; 82% persist in computing. The NCWIT Aspirations in Computing (AiC) Educator Award publicly celebrates formal and informal educators who encourage high school women’s interest and participation in technology pursuits. Since its inception in 2011, the regional Aspirations in Computing Educator Award, has honored close to 600 educators. In 2018, NCWIT partnered with IAAMCS and funded the Modern Figure podcasts: a conversational-style podcast that elevates the voices of Black female scholars in computing and a commitment to engage and conduct outreach for Aspirations in Computing.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

NATIONAL CENTER FOR WOMEN AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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NATIONAL CENTER FOR WOMEN AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Board of directors
as of 12/04/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nancy Phillips

Flexential

Colin Bodell

Groupon

Phillip Bond

Bond & Associates

Michael Borrus

X/Seed Capital

Veronica Caropreso Blackham

NCWIT

Brad Feld

Foundry Group

Debbie Guild

The PNC Financial Services Group

Kathleen Hogan

Microsoft

Farnam Jahanian

Carnegie Mellon University

Maggie Johnson

Google

Trish Jones

eMentorConnect LLC

Rick Klau

GV

George Llado

Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Krista Marks

Woot Math

Beth Mazzeo

Bloomberg

Vicki Mealer-Burke

Qualcomm

Georgia Papathomas

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceuticals

Kim Vorrath

Apple

Dave Williams

Merck

Avis Yates Rivers

Technology Concepts Group International, LLC

Janice Zdankus

Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Daron Green

Facebook

Kavya Kopparapu

Student, Harvard University

Chris Moody

Foundry Group

Katharina Mumford

Bank of America

Anthony Neal-Graves

Colorado Broadband Office

Thaddeus Arroyo

AT&T Business

Jenifer Robertson

AT&T Services

Organizational demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/05/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.