Youth Development

NATIONAL CENTER FOR WOMEN AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

  • Boulder, CO
  • www.ncwit.org

Mission Statement

Although women today comprise half the world's population and more than half of the U.S. professional workforce, they play only a small role in inventing the technology of tomorrow. Capitalizing on the power of gender diversity can yield a larger and more competitive information technology (IT) workforce, and in a world dependent on innovation, it can enable the design of technology that is as influential and extensive as the populations it serves.

NCWIT is the National Center for Women & Information Technology, a non-profit organization chartered in 2004 by the National Science Foundation to increase the participation of girls and women in computing. Before NCWIT was formed, programs focusing on women and computing (K-12, post secondary, or corporate) existed mostly in isolation, without the benefit of shared best practices, effective resources, communication with others, or national reach. Today, these programs are part of the NCWIT community, where a “change leader network" of both men and women access evidence-based tools and resources and participate in an action-oriented national community of events and projects. Together we are having a far greater impact than if institutions acted alone.

Main Programs

  1. Aspirations in Computing
  2. Pacesetters
  3. Extension Services
  4. Counselors for Computing
  5. Heroes Entrepreneurial Interviews
  6. Workforce Alliance
  7. Academic Alliance
  8. K-12 Alliance
  9. Entrepreneurial Alliance
  10. Affinity Group Alliance
  11. Social Science Advisory Board
  12. Sit With Me
  13. EngageCSEdu
  14. Technolochicas
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

NCWIT convenes and provisions its rapidly growing coalition of nearly 900 prominent corporations, academic institutions, startup companies, and non-profits from across the U.S., grouped into Alliances (K-12, Academic, Workforce, Entrepreneurial, and Affinity Group). NCWIT Alliances work collaboratively throughout the year, and convene annually at the NCWIT Summit on Women in IT. NCWIT campaigns enlist our members in efforts such as building a national female talent pipeline for computing (Aspirations in Computing), training for school counselors (Counselors for Computing) and changing the image of computing (Sit With Me).

ruling year

2004

CEO and Co-Founder

Self-reported

Lucinda Sanders

Chairman of the Board

Self-reported

Brad Feld

Keywords

Self-reported

Computing Technology Coding Women Girls Computer Science STEM

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Also Known As

NCWIT

EIN

68-0591481

 Number

4138863491

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Business, Youth Development (O53)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

• Member Engagement — 96% of members report finding NCWIT membership useful personally or to their organization.

• Research Brand — NCWIT has created more than 160 research-based resources, data sheets, tool kits, practices, etc., which are available at the NCWIT website.

• National Reach — Through its vast member network, the K-12 Alliance has the potential to reach 100% of the girls in the United States.

• Educational Pipeline Growth —The AiC Community, the largest network of its kind, includes more than 7,000 women. 91% of participants now in college are majoring or minoring in STEM and 77% are majoring in computer science or computer engineering. All 50 states have regional coverage.

• Increased Enrollments — Academic Alliance members, particularly those with more than two years of membership, are associated with a higher average female CS graduation rate in comparison to non-members. In addition, each additional year of NCWIT membership in the Academic Alliance is associated with a 1% increase in the percent of females graduating.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Aspirations in Computing

Not available

Category

Youth Development, General/Other

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Program 2

Pacesetters

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

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Budget

Program 3

Extension Services

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

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Budget

Program 4

Counselors for Computing

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

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Budget

Program 5

Heroes Entrepreneurial Interviews

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

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Program 6

Workforce Alliance

Not available

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None

Population(s) Served

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Program 7

Academic Alliance

Not available

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None

Population(s) Served

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Program 8

K-12 Alliance

Not available

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None

Population(s) Served

None

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Program 9

Entrepreneurial Alliance

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

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Program 10

Affinity Group Alliance

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

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Program 11

Social Science Advisory Board

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Program 12

Sit With Me

Not available

Category

None

Population(s) Served

None

None

None

Budget

Program 13

EngageCSEdu

Not available

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Program 14

Technolochicas

Not available

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Increase membership base each year.

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Between 2014 and 2015, NCWIT membership grew by 5%.

2. Distribute 30-50K resources annually, increase the number of resource downloads.

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In 2015, NCWIT distributed over 80,000 hard copy resources and online resource downloads increased by 53% over 2014. It's possible that downloaded resources have become substitutes for hard copies.

3. Increase the number of NCWIT press and blog mentions.

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In 2015, NCWIT was mentioned in 266 press mentions, a 7% increase since 2014. This also broke the record for most NCWIT press mentions in a single year.

4. At least 75% of members report active engagement with NCWIT.

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In 2015, 86 percent of survey respondents indicated they have in at lease one way been involved with NCWIT or it's alliances.

5. Members report organizational changes occurring related to NCWIT membership.

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Our results show that 63 percent of Member Survey respondents reported that their organization enacted some form of change in 2015.

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    NCWIT is working to significantly increase girls' and women's meaningful participation in computing. We work across the full pipeline, K-12 through career, and engage nearly 900 distinguished change leader organizations from across the United States.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    The NCWIT Theory of Change identifies the necessary conditions for change, while
    supporting action that accomplishes sustained reform of social systems. NCWIT
    puts its Theory into practice through the NCWIT Three-pronged Strategy. The
    Strategy aims to improve awareness and knowledge, and motivate change leaders
    to act. Thus, the Strategy works to ensure the necessary “pre-states" in change
    leaders to make their own individual changes and to initiate organizational changes
    to bring about sustained systemic change.

    Through staff expertise and activities, NCWIT acts as the backbone for
    coordinating, supporting, and accelerating members' collective impact:

    NCWIT convenes: NCWIT brings together men and women change leaders
    who carry out projects and initiatives in support of NCWIT's mission. They
    represent nearly 900 universities, companies, non-profits, and government
    organizations that are grouped into five Alliances. These change leaders
    convene annually at the NCWIT Summit — a three-day event where
    collaboration leads to action and produces positive results for others to follow.

    NCWIT equips: NCWIT provides free, online research-based resources for
    reform at every level to help individuals implement change, raise awareness,
    and reach out to critical populations. These resources are frequently cited by
    national media outlets and widely distributed through outreach events and
    members' networks.

    NCWIT unites: NCWIT develops programs for members to achieve goals
    focused on policy reform, image change, outreach to underrepresented
    groups, and more. These programs unify change leaders in an action-oriented
    movement to create national change
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our capabilities include
    1) a national membership of nearly 90 change leader organizations
    2) a research network of over 25 distinguished gender/computing research scientists
    3) 35 full time staff
    4) support from the National Science Foundation and major research institutions
    5) a distinguished Board of Directors
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    NCWIT has contracted to the University of Washington's Center for Evaluation & Research for STEM Equity for its external evaluation. They provide a full report each year with information regarding our current metrics and recommendations for improving our strategies.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Please see our annual report for progress thus far.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

NCWIT convenes and provisions its rapidly growing coalition of nearly 900 prominent corporations, academic institutions, startup companies, and non-profits from across the U.S., grouped into Alliances (K-12, Academic, Workforce, Entrepreneurial, and Affinity Group). NCWIT Alliances work collaboratively throughout the year, and convene annually at the NCWIT Summit on Women in IT. NCWIT campaigns enlist our members in efforts such as building a national female talent pipeline for computing (Aspirations in Computing), training for school counselors (Counselors for Computing) and changing the image of computing (Sit With Me).

Social Media

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR WOMEN AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR WOMEN AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Co-Chair
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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CEO and Co-Founder

Lucinda Sanders

Chairman of the Board

Brad Feld

BIO

Lucy Sanders is CEO and Co-founder of the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) and also serves as Executive-in-Residence for the ATLAS Institute at the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU).

Lucy has an extensive industry background, having worked in R&D and executive (VP) positions at AT&T Bell Labs, Lucent Bell Labs, and Avaya Labs for over 20 years, where she specialized in systems-level software and solutions (multi-media communication, and customer relationship management. In 1996, Lucy was awarded the Bell Labs Fellow Award, the highest technical accomplishment bestowed at the company, and she has six patents in the communications technology area.

Lucy serves on several high-tech startup and non-profit boards, and frequently advises young technology companies. Lucy has served on the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) Board of Trustees at the University of California at Berkeley, as well as on the Information Technology Research and Development Ecosystem Commission for the National Academies and the Innovation Advisory Board for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Lucy is a recipient -- along with NCWIT co-founders Robert Schnabel and Telle Whitney -- of the Computing Research Association's 2012 A. Nico Habermann Award. In 2004 she was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Department of Engineering at CU, and in 2011 she was recognized with the university's George Norlin Distinguished Service Award. She has been inducted into the Women in Technology International (WITI) Hall of Fame and is a recipient of the 2013 U.S. News STEM Leadership Hall of Fame Award. Lucy received her BS and MS in computer science from Louisiana State University and the University of Colorado at Boulder, respectively.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Brad Feld

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?