The Britton Fund. Inc.

Porterville, CA   |  http://www.thebrittonfund.org/

Mission

Provide funding for research and education to benefit the field of arboriculture and urban forestry with emphasis on issues inherent to the geographic area of California, Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii.

Ruling year info

2007

President

Douglas Anderson

Main address

31910 Country Club Dr

Porterville, CA 93257 USA

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EIN

68-0634735

NTEE code info

Biological & Life Sciences (U50)

Management & Technical Assistance (A02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Urban forests provide many societal and ecological services to cities and their inhabitants. Many species of trees are under stress due to anthropogenic and natural climate changes. Projected climatic shifts will change temperature, precipitation, and the incidences of pest and disease outbreaks. The tolerance of urban trees to these stressors varies considerably among species and the perpetuation of urban forests depends on tree species resilience to climate induced stress within particular climate zones. The objective of this study is to provide new information on what tree species to plant in which climate zones, by field-testing the most promising cultivars. Trees were selected for testing based on evaluation of climate induced risk factors that impact their vulnerability or resilience. Risk factors used in the analysis are (1) habitat specificity: sunlight exposure, soil texture and pH, soil moisture (2) physiology: drought tolerance, salt tolerance, wind tolerance (3) biological

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

What trees to plant? Trees fit for the future

By identifying trees that perform best under stressors associated with climate change, we can help shift the palette of trees commonly planted in California’s landscapes to species that will provide the most environmental, social and economic value in the future. There is a need for science-based information on tree species that could be planted as replacements of highly vulnerable species to increase the resilience of California’s urban forests.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Farmers

This project is the first comprehensive tree/infrastructure damage study that has been done in Hawaii, with intended results affecting all tropical/sub-tropical urban environments, as well as temperate climate urban tree plantings. Currently, there is an extreme lack of urban tree research in the State of Hawaii, and this project begins to address the wide ranging need for not only Hawaii, but all urban tree environments. Predominately all urban tree research has been done in temperate climates, which does not address the constant growth and conditions that are experienced in tropical/sub-tropical environments such as Hawaii.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Academics

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By identifying trees that perform best under stressors associated with climate change, we can help shift the palette of trees commonly planted in California’s landscapes to species that will provide the most environmental, social and economic value in the future. There is a need for science-based information on tree species that could be planted as replacements of highly vulnerable species to increase the resilience of California’s urban forests.

We intend to develop a list of desired tree species for adaptable landscaping in California and then transfer the "science" to the Arizona, Nevada and Hawaii to develop regional lists in those geographic areas.

Current Status: This study is evaluating the growth and survival of climate-ready trees in three climate zones: Central Valley, Inland Empire and Southern California Coast. Twelve tree species were chosen for testing in each climate zone. The trees are new to most people working in California’s arboricultural industry, but are currently produced and sold by a few nurseries in other states.
Trees are located at UC Cooperative Extension (UCCE) Field Station reference sites in Davis (Inland Valley), Irvine (Southern California Coast) and Riverside (Inland Empire) for side-by-side comparisons under similar growing and maintenance conditions. Four replicates were planted in a complete randomized block design, with all 48 (4 replicates x 12 species in each site) trees receiving the same irrigation, pruning and other maintenance activities. Within each climate zone, an additional 96 trees were planted in 4 parks (2 replicates per park, 24 trees per park) where growing conditions and maintenance activities are more variable. The Central Valley trees were planted in spring 2015 and the Southern California Coast and Inland Empire trees were planted in spring 2016. The trees in the Central Valley zone have been measured and evaluated three times, while those planted in the Inland Empire and Southern California Coast climate zones have been measured and evaluated two times. Thus far, survival and growth rates are as expected, with reference site trees out-performing park trees. We have developed the Climate-Ready Trees website as a repository for information on the location and performance of the trees we are testing (http://climatereadytrees.ucdavis.edu/). Information on the study is being shared through presentations at WC ISA meetings and UC Cooperative Extension education and outreach activities.

Research Plan: We have analyzed soil samples from each site and measured irrigation application rates at each of the Central Valley sites. Stem water potential is being measured at the UC Davis reference site to determine when to begin irrigation based on plant water stress. We are monitoring the trees annually for the first five years and biannually thereafter. During monitoring, tree measurements are taken and observations of performance, growth and structure, as well as the presence of pests and diseases are made. Tree measurements include: diameter at breast height (dbh) (to nearest 0.1 cm by tape), tree height (to nearest 0.1 m by range pole), and crown diameter in two directions (to nearest 0.1 m by tape).

Once determined - the process and data will be used to develop like information in a broader geographic area.

We have entered a grant agreement with a diverse team to continue to monitor and report out on this project.

1) Tree Measurements. Trees in the 4 Inland Valley Parks (Sacramento area) and the UC Davis reference site were measured in May. At the Inland Empire and Southern California Coast sites (8 parks, 2 reference sites), Natalie van Doorn and Erika Teach measured trees in June.

2) Stem Water Potential Measurements. In 2019, stem water potential measurements were made for all trees in April, June, August, and October in the UC Davis reference site; and in June and August in the UCANR Irvine and UC Riverside reference sites, of those species also planted in the UC Davis site. Erika Teach carried out these measurements. Prof Ken Shackel (UC Davis) is providing technical guidance.

3) New Pruning Methods Study. Pruning was carried out on all the trees in the UC Davis reference site in April, 2019, by Jim Downer and Alison Berry, according to the pruning method under development. We are currently in process of writing up the results for publication.

4) Outreach and Education
• 6/12/2019. Climate-Ready Trees Project. Erika Teach. Los Angeles Center for Natural Resource Sustainability in Los Angeles, CA; Erika Teach, June 12, 2019.
• 7/24/2019. Climate Change and Landscape Trees. Janet Hartin. American Society for Horticultural Science, Las Vegas, NV.
• 7/31/2019. Sustainable Urban Systems/Trees for Tomorrow. Janet Hartin. Urban planning conference, Los Angeles, CA.
• 9/14/2019. Trees for Tomorrow. Janet Hartin. Orange County Master Gardener advanced training.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Britton Fund serves the tree care community in California, Arizona, Nevada and Hawaii

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Britton Fund. Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Britton Fund. Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Douglas Anderson

Anderson Tree Care Specialists, Inc.

Term: 2007 - 2023

Dennis Swartzell

Horticulture Consultants, Inc.

Carl Mellinger

Mellinger Consulting Arborists

Kevin Eckert

Arbor Global, LLC

Richard Gessner

Monarch Consulting Arborists

A Downer

UCCE Ventura County

Nancy Hughes

California Urban Forests Council

Oscar Sanchez

TreeCareLA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability