The Woman's Exchange

Nothing tells a story like a home.

aka Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses   |   New Orleans, LA   |  www.hgghh.org

Mission

Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses, managed by The Woman’s Exchange, preserves two 19th-century French Quarter homes and, through their architecture, collections, and history, inspires discourse about our collective past and its relevance to our present and future. Visitors, students, and researchers explore such diverse topics as the lives of the houses’ owners and enslaved people, free people of color, open-hearth cooking, mourning rituals, and the entrepreneurial pursuits of women.

Ruling year info

1937

Executive Director

Tessa Jagger

Main address

P.O. Box 56836

New Orleans, LA 70156 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

72-0408902

NTEE code info

History Museums (A54)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Museum Interpretation

AAM (American Alliance of Museums)-accredited, leading authorities on historic preservation in the French Quarter, the Hermann-Grima House (c.1831) and the Gallier House (c.1860) are integral parts of the history of New Orleans. Representing two distinctly different styles of architecture, these properties are important reflections of the 19th and 20th century. Situated at opposite ends of the French Quarter, these museums are central components to the historic fabric of the Vieux Carré. These historic houses are recognized as having a national significance in commemorating the history of New Orleans and the United States. Both are listed on the National Registry of Historic Places and were granted National Historic Landmark status in 1975.

The guest experience at the Hermann-Grima House and the Gallier House features an accurate and compelling interpretation of the social history of New Orleans and the lives of all the people who lived within or were associated with the properties. This historical portrait includes the families of European descent who owned the residences, as well as the people of African descent (enslaved people and free people of color) who lived and worked here.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Gallier Gatherings is a monthly lecture series that brings in diverse speakers and audiences. Monthly topics cover historical, cultural, and geographical topics that relate to Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses and the rich history of New Orleans.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Academics
Activists

Hermann-Grima Historis House has the only original open hearth kitchen still in operation in the French Quarter and is one of two in the state of Louisiana. This kitchen is a treasure and the focal point of many visits to the house. Each month, volunteers cook meals in the kitchen using Creole Cookery, the second oldest cookbook published in New Orleans, which was also published by The Woman's Exchange.
Visitors are delighted to learn about authentic Creole cooking and see it in action, where each item is made completely from scratch. This is a vital tool to teach our guests about the roles and lives of enslaved people on the property as well.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST TOURS IN NEW ORLEANS BY CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER!

A century after the first enslaved Africans landed on the shores of Virginia, enslaved persons arrived to a newly founded French colony, La Nouvelle Orleans, in 1719. By 1830, the population of enslaved persons made up one third of New Orleans’ total population. Urban enslavement in New Orleans greatly influenced the Crescent City’s status as one of the most African cities in the western hemisphere, and these contributions are ever-present through the city’s celebrated culture.

On this tour, visitors will learn about the experience of enslaved women, men, and children in urban settings and how they differentiate from that of rural plantations. Hear the stories of Catherine, Maria, and other individuals of African descent who were enslaved by the Hermann and Grima families and view the French Quarter property through the lens of enslavement.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Academics

Where we work

Accreditations

The American Alliance of Museums (AAM) 1986

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of unique website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HGGHH's current goals, as outlined in the Strategic Plan are:

Goal 1: Achieve AAM re-accreditation.
Goal 2: Diversify programs and people.
Goal 3: Secure long-term financial sustainability.
Goal 4: Expand our audience.

These goals have been set to allow HGGHH to fulfill its mission to preserve two 19th-century French Quarter homes and, through their architecture, collections, and history, inspire discourse about our collective past and its relevance to our present and future.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses is located in New Orleans, Louisiana and serves locals and tourists. We host many school groups, special interest groups, professional organizations, and individuals interested in cultural history. 390,000 residents call New Orleans (Orleans Parish) home. Locally, the demographics of New Orleans are: 59.74% Black, 33.99% white, 2.90% of Asian descent, 1.83% two or more races, 0.16% indigenous, and 0.03% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We solicit feedback from the attendees of our monthly lecture series, Gallier Gatherings. Guests recommend topics they would like to know more about and we pursue speakers with the expertise to cover the subject matter.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

The Woman's Exchange
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Woman's Exchange

Board of directors
as of 01/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Katherine Raymond

Tulane University

Term: 2021 - 2022

Sallee Benjamin

Elizabeth Favrot

Anne Gardiner

Renee Laborde

Patti Lapeyre

Holly Nieset

Adrienne Rynning

Jennifer Steck

Sheila Favrot

Kit Fritchie

Julie Habetz

Stacy Head

Lise Kuhn

Julie Simpson

Anne Urquhart

Ginny Wirth

Harriet Riley

Jeanne Swingle

Katherine Raymond

Kathleen Van Horn

Lori Paige

Marion McCollam

Mary Schmidt

Pam Cooper

Angel Parham

Peggy Stafford

Sarah Meckstroth

Zella Palmer

C. Bapst

Celeste Eustis

Dorothy Mann

Sarah Martzolf

Merisa Pasternak

Amy Robertson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/30/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/30/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.