Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Honoring ordinary people who did the extraordinary to protect our freedom.

aka National Museum of the Pacific War   |   Fredericksburg, TX   |  http://www.pacificwarmuseum.org/our-story/about/

Mission

Operate and support the State-owned Museum experience through its extensive collection, to educate and inspire present and future generations about WW-II in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater and the continued global relevance of its lessons.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Admiral Nimitz Foundation is committed to engaging visitors of all ages in the stories of the Greatest Generation's service on the Pacific front lines and home front during WWII--the stories of everyday people in extraordinary circumstances. We explore shared values and present stories as both physical experiences and virtual engagement as we work to connect contemporary audiences to America's victory in the Pacific Theater. Through personal narratives and collected objects, correspondence, and images, the museum interprets the major events that shaped the war's outcome, advancements in domestic manufacturing and home front industries, and the cultural complexities of race, ethnicity, gender in America during this fraught time. Everything we do centers around this priority. We remain committed to continually connecting these essential stories to as broad an audience as possible.

Ruling year info

1964

President and CEO

General Michael W. Hagee USMC (Ret)

Main address

328 E Main St

Fredericksburg, TX 78624 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-1492692

NTEE code info

History Museums (A54)

Museum & Museum Activities (A50)

Historical Societies and Related Activities (A80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Racism, discrimination, gender bias and inequality have long woven through American culture, especially during times of crisis. Using actions in the Pacific War as the focus, we aim to reinterpret the war-time experiences and include individuals' experiences shaped by racism, discrimination, gender bias and inequality In so doing, we aim to increase historical literacy and explore the stories of the Greatest Generation through a much broader lens.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

National Museum of the Pacific War

The National Museum of the Pacific War consists of: 1) Admiral Nimitz Gallery which chronicles the life and career of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz and features state-of-the-art, interactive exhibits; 2) George H.W. Bush Gallery, a 35, 000 square foot gallery that includes interactive exhibits and artifacts presenting the factual record of heroism, tragedy and triumph during WWII in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater; 3) Plaza of the Presidents, an outdoor tribute to the 10 American presidents who served in the armed forces during WWII; 4) Memorial Wall and Courtyard displaying plaques and bricks dedicated to those who fought in WWII; 5) Japanese Garden of Peace donated by the people of Japan as a symbolic gift of peace that features traditional Japanese design and a replica of the famed Admiral Togo's study.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Work status and occupations

Where we work

Accreditations

American Alliance of Museums 2020

Smithsonian Affiliates 2020

Awards

Outstanding New Program Award 2021

Connected2Texas

Award of Excellence- Virtual Experiences (Distance Learning via Classrooms) 2021

Texas Association of Museum Media Innovation and Excellence Awards

Affiliations & memberships

American Alliance Of Museums 2020

Smithsonian Affiliates 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Family relationships, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status

Related Program

National Museum of the Pacific War

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All community events focus on education of historical events, honoring those who participated in WWII & the Asiatic-Pacific Theater, or drawing community support of preserving lessons learned in WWII.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

National Museum of the Pacific War

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is defined as general donations (unrestricted) toward Events, Symposium, Annual Appeal, Mission Sustainment, Giving Tuesday and 3rd party direct marketing.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

National Museum of the Pacific War

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The amount of volunteer hours in 2020 were a direct reflection of COVID-19 related restrictions on admissions, groups sales, public events & other public settings that would require volunteer services

Total number of paid admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

National Museum of the Pacific War

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The paid admissions decrease in 2020 was a direct reflection of COVID-19 impacts, closing for 2 months and then operating under a timed admissions format for remainder of the year.

Total number of free admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

National Museum of the Pacific War

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Free Admissions are a reflection of member attendance, school field trips, or from WWII-era veterans who visit. 2020 results are a reflection of COVID-19 impacts on overall attendance for the year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Key to our mission is Fredericksburg native Fleet Admiral Admiral Chester Nimitz's direct request that the Foundation honor those who served in his command. With Admiral Nimitz's legacy of leadership as a guiding theme, and extraordinary recent scholarship presented by international experts on WWII in the Pacific, we have unprecedented access to the stories of the men, women and children who stepped up and served.

Every branch of the military was segregated. While Nimitz was a distinct and effective leader, he was (in many ways) a man of his time. He believed women should be at home with children, not in the service, and that black men should only serve as cooks or stevedores. During the initial attack on Pearl Harbor, Ship's Cook Third Class Doris Miller, an African American from Waco, TX, broke rank and manned a machine gun. Weeks later, Nimitz pinned the Navy Cross on Miller's shirt.

More than a million black troops served, but most were led by white officers. We need to know their stories.

More than 750,000 Mexican Americans served in the War, earning more Medals of Honor than any other ethnic group. We need to know their stories.

The Navaho Code Talkers and OSS women broke codes and created complex communications systems that helped win the war. We need to know their stories.

America interned Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. Japanese Americans joined the services and fought beside white troops. We need to know their stories.

As we face the future, individually and collectively, these are the stories we aim to explore, connecting cultural values about who and what we were then to who and what we are now.

As the Foundation and Museum work to tell a more complete story of WW-II in the Pacific, understanding and interpreting the stories of ALL people involved--regardless of sex, race, nationality, or economic status--is critical.

Recent scholarship and new insights into diverse ethnic, racial, and gender-based experiences on the front and at home provide opportunities to connect complex personal stories of Greatest Generation and their war-time experiences to today's. By integrating new technology, including augmented and virtual reality and immersive elements, we are committed to inviting visitors into a dynamic investigation into the role of American culture and values before, during, and after the War and its impact on Americans from coast-to-coast.

Our current storylines have deep roots in World War II archives and collections, survivors' oral histories, 1940s-era media coverage, and extensive late 20th century interpretations of the war, our museum interprets the major victories and losses, geography, chronology, and strategic leadership decisions. For the most part, it is a story told in extreme contrasts--winners and losers, , lacking the nuances of culture and tradition, and shaped by white, Eurocentric

In 2022, the Foundation will design and install a permanent children's exhibit in the George HW Bush Gallery. With STEM as a foundation, the children's exhibit will inspire young visitors to imagine themselves as a soldier or sailor and, through interactive exhibits and games, challenge them to try their hand at code-breaking and communications, packing essential survival and battle gear and even daily chores, Victory Gardens and recycling efforts.

In addition, during 2022/23 we will set in motion a major renovation of the Bush Gallery. This latter effort will include enhanced technologies to better engage visitors stories of individuals from all walks of life and how they accomplished extremely difficult tasks under stressful conditions and in dangerous circumstances. With an expert team of advisors, we will focus on individual contributions by men, women and children of African American, Hispanic, Japanese, and Navaho heritage--and how their heritage and traditions helped shape America's victory.

So that visitors may more personally connect to the stories of WWII in the Pacific and the Homefront, the exhibits will feature oral histories and survivors' narratives told in their own voices and will focus on those universal values we all share love of family and friends, loyalty, faith, anger, fear and more. The experience will integrate leading-edge technologies to enrich those stories through virtual reality, smart device integrations, and interactive stations explore-more stations. To enhance the environmental feel of the Asian-Pacific Theater, the ANF/NMPW will integrate immersive elements that replicate a bombed runway, jungle camp, captain's bridge, or home front challenges and comforts . . . a manufacturing facility, a home kitchen, one of Roosevelt's Fireside Chats.

Working with preeminent military historians and African American, Hispanic, Japanese, and Navaho historians, the ANF/NMPW has gathered experts to help shape the stories we will tell. A team of advisors including representatives from the museum community (including other Smithsonian Affiliate and certified American Alliance of Museums partners), childhood development and early education experts, will advise on story development, and help narrow the myriad narratives into select storylines that effectively illustrate the comprehensive American experience.

The Museum campus extends over six acres. The existing gallery space is about 33,000 ft. As the renovations proceed, the internal shape of the exhibits will be opened and enriched to better facilitate a more nuanced storyline and complement visitor flow. The ANF/NMPW's collections and archives provide the foundation of the exhibits' artifacts, and range from aircraft (B-25s and TBM Avengers) and artillery, to uniforms, flags, ration coupons and weapons, to personal photo collections, correspondence, and oral histories.

The ANF has secured funding, contracted a design firm, developed a plan and consulted with experts as we begin designing the children's exhibit's amenities and layout. The exhibit will occupy existing space and the key storylines, narrative voices, and exhibit interactives (both digital and mechanical) have been identified. The ANF will work with a trusted teams of planners, designers, and contractors to complete the project.

So that the museum brand and exhibit flow may extend from the children's exhibit experience to the WWII in the Pacific experience seamlessly, the same exhibit team is in place to renovate the George HW Bush Gallery's story of WWII in the Pacific. The ANF is conducting initial interviews with national subject matter experts and evaluating potential modification to the gallery's footprint to accommodate planned changes and enrich the visitor's understanding of America and Americans during WWII.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Mission of the Admiral Nimitz Foundation and National Museum of the Pacific War is to connect people to the stories of WWII in the Pacific—from the battlefield to the home front. The museum welcomes an average of 150,000 visitors each year. They are diverse in age, race, gender, and ethnicity and travel from around the world. For those who cannot visit in person, we offer community outreach and on-campus programs at primary/secondary schools, as well distance learning programs, webinars and events on our social media platforms. More than 50,000 historians, scholars, educators, students and general audiences participate in our virtual programs annually.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email, Trial Website User Study,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    To increase participation in free educational webinars, we surveyed past participants of our public programs to gain suggestions for new programming topics and content for the 2022 annual Webinar schedule. We also obtained feedback from Museum visitors who discussed navigational challenges while on the museum campus, going between galleries and in how traffic flowed in the larger gallery. As a result of visitor feedback we incorporated new directional signage. Finally in early 2021 we launched a new website, that included suggestions from a "focus group" of users who provided information on how to improve navigation and access to various levels of content based on their levels of interest (i.e. curriculum for educators).

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    A visitors' positive experience is vital. We rely on visitor and supporter feedback and execute improvements, whether it is the museum experience, a fund-raising event, a public community event or partnering with community businesses and civic leaders. Because we are not located in a metropolitan area, we rely on repeat visitation, sustained engagement through memberships, and word-of-mouth recommendations to friends and family. The evolution of the Foundation and Museum has been one of growth for 30+ years largely in part because we have listened and sustained continuous relationships with a large contingent of supporters. Even in a COVID-restricted environment we adjusted our programming and experiences based on what audiences and supporters expected for a safe experience.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Admiral Nimitz Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Board of directors
as of 10/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Case Fischer

Fischer & Wieser Specialty Foods, Inc.

Term: 2021 - 2021

Capt. Sam Howard, USN (Ret)

Elizabeth Boldrick

VADM William D. Crowder, USN (Ret)

Nancy L. Dreher

John E. Harris

Steven L. Highlander

Andrea Feiler

John L. Nau, III

Bruce Nichols

Greg Shrader

LtGen Willie Williams

David D. Fitch

Robert B. Phelps

Robert F. Wheless

Case D. Fischer

Mark A. Roche

CAPT Michael B. Tatsch, USN (Ret)

General MIchael W. Hagee, USMC (Ret)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.