Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas, Inc.

aka Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas, Inc.   |   San Antonio, TX   |  http://www.bigmentor.org/

Mission

Our mission is to to provide children facing adversity with professionally supported, one-to-one mentoring relationships that change their lives for the better, forever. Our vision is that all children achieve success in life.

Ruling year info

1977

Principal Officer

Denise Barkhurst

Main address

10843 Gulfdale Dr.

San Antonio, TX 78216 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-1897630

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas

To match kids with positive role models who provide meaningful friendships and share fun experiences.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Outstanding Small Business 2011

Make a Difference Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of high school seniors who graduate from high school on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Related Program

Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Depends on funding for number of participants per year - percents are all above 90%.

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Operations were negatively effected during the pandemic. Though the number of youth served has decreased, we have expanded our focus on serving parents through asset and safety training.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The social problems addressed by the Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas program are the environmental dysfunctional cycles that prevent youth from realizing their potential. These include teen pregnancy, academic failure, abuse and domestic violence, dropping out of high school, juvenile delinquency and incarceration. Too many youth do not have the role models and mentors they need to overcome their environmental obstacles so they end up repeating the behaviors they were born into and the cycles continue. A mentor is a cog in the wheel, providing youth with different perspectives and the support to overcome obstacles and achieve success.

The innovation in what we do is that each youth has a different set of circumstances that can be addressed by the program. Each volunteer mentor is supported by professional agency staff and paired one to one with a child. Matches are made to last and based on similar interests, hobbies and geographic location. The needs of each individual child and the skills and life experiences of each volunteer are taken into account when making matches. This is a tailored, scalable solution to youth development problems. BBBSST is a unique community based program that seeks to address the root causes of each youth's problems by assessing the youth's environment and placing a volunteer in that environment who acts as a friend, support and guide. The volunteer meets regularly with the child for a minimum requirement of a year but the average length of a match is over 2 years for matches that meet in the community, and approaching 2 years for matches that start out in the workplace, which is a newer opportunity.

A historic mentoring study that found mentoring to have strong positive impacts on children, indicated that “Only organizations that develop an infrastructure similar to Big Brothers Big Sisters model can expect similar results." The program's success was attributed to the presence of staff support and the agency infrastructure, the “glue" of the mentoring process. (Impact Study, 1995). Since 1995, BBBSST has continued to focus in on and hone the elements of its service delivery system. This has resulted in BBBSST consistently out performing other mentoring programs in terms of both quantity and quality. BBBSST is the only mentoring program in town with a wait list of volunteers because it understands that volunteer recruiters are essential for a program that relies on volunteers, especially a one to one mentoring program. BBBSST also out-recruits many of its own affiliates across the country, many of which consider volunteer recruitment a lesser important function than match support in the sense that they have full time employees who support matches but recruitment is an add-on to other jobs and there is not full time recruiter(s).
BBBSST is also a leader in internally evaluating the effectiveness of its program both in terms of outputs and outcomes. No other mentoring program in San Antonio (that we have been able to find) can report its average match length, 6 and 12 month retention rates, volunteer yield rates, and strength of relationship scores. BBBSST also reports regularly on asset development in youth, risk behavior avoidance and aspirational beliefs. These capabilities sets us apart not only from most other mentoring programs, but also many other youth development approaches. All of the mentoring research has found that longer matches = stronger matches, so measuring how long a mentoring relationships persists is extremely important in facilitating student outcomes.

Numbers of Youth served:
1,808 youth were served in San Antonio in 2016
Over 1,000 new volunteers made an inquiry into the program

Length and Strength (2016 measured annually):
The average length of a community based mentoring relationship is 24.8 months
The average length of a school based mentoring relationship is 21.8 months
The longest match currently being supported has been matched for almost 11 years
Currently 85.1% of community based matches make it to the 6 month point and 58.1% to 12 months
In the school based program the 6 month retention rate is 91.3% and the 12 month retention rate is 67.1%
The average strength of relationship score for a match at the 3 month point is 4.42 (out of 5).
The Strength of Relationship measure utilized by BBBSST staff has assisted in increasing retention rates by up to 12% over the last year by helping identify matches with weak relationships early on.

Asset Development (2016– 8 of 21 measured annually):
Asset Area- % of students that improve or maintain asset
Self-confidence: 87%
Ability to make decisions: 78%
Have a sense of the future: 82%
Positive attitude towards school: 69%
Are more prepared to avoid delinquency, substance abuse, and early parenting: 81%

Education Outcomes (2016- measured annually):
Data shows that there are statistically significantly gains in the community based mentoring program in nearly every area and that 96% of students improved in at least 1 of 8 major categories.
94% of students report they will finish high school
79% expect to go to college
64% expect to finish college
58% reported decreased truancy

Workplace (2016- measured annually):
96% of student expect to graduate high school
84% plan to attend college

Resiliency & Protective Factors (2010)
100% of youth, identified as at-risk due to common risk factors, remained incident free
93% of youth feel better about themselves
88% feel they can make better decisions
87% feel the program taught them what is okay and what isn't okay

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ken Olson

Retired Citibank

Term: 2017 - 2022


Board co-chair

Damon Childs

Edwards Aquifer Authority

Term: 2017 - 2022

Denise Barkhurst

Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas

Damon Childs

Edwards Aquifer Authority

William Garner

USAA

Ken Olson

Retired- Citigroup

Michelle Scott

Security Service Federal Credit Union

William Haynie

J&S Audio Visual

Basel Murad

EPIC Midstream

Elva Salinas

Capital Group

Kim Kieny

Generations Federal CU

Manuel Mungia

Chasnoff Stribling

Angelica Reyna

BBBS-Little

Eric Vigil

Lawyer

Gilbert Gonzalez

Corpus Christi Medical Center

Hunter Shurtleff

Shurtleff Law Firm

Michael Applegate

IBC Bank

Robert McCullough

JP Morgan Chase

Adah King

USAA

Gabrielle Herrera

Sammis & Ochoa

Jennifer Pineda

First Service Residential

Tricia Richardson

Frost Bank

Nicki Elgie

Evans, Rowe and Holbrook

Rob Williams

HEB

Billy Williams

USAA

Robert Smith

Navy Recruiting District

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/13/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data