Christian Community Service Center

Feeding hunger, Fostering Hope, Furthering Success

aka CCSC   |   Houston, TX   |  www.ccschouston.org

Mission

The mission of the Christian Community Service Center (CCSC) is to serve the poor, hungry, disabled, and otherwise needy while respecting their religious, ethnic or cultural differences. CCSC was created out of faith, and founded in the belief that we are called to help all God's children heart to heart and hand in hand.

Ruling year info

1980

Execuitive Director

Ms. Michelle Shonbeck

Main address

P. O. Box 27924

Houston, TX 77227-7924 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2128141

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Employment Training (J22)

Thrift Shops (P29)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CCSC works to alleviate hunger, homelessness, lack of medical care, and other symptoms of poverty. Programs in three overlapping areas address fundamental issues: Basic needs addressing hunger, housing, medical and providing longer-term referrals; Employment through three programs addressing vocational training and job readiness skills; and Youth services providing school supplies and uniforms, toys, educational materials and food at Christmas, and a vision care program offering vision screening for low-income students and furnishing prescription glasses. According to the National KIDS COUNT Data Center, 33% of Houston’s children live in poverty. The poverty rate for the entire city is 27.3%, higher than the state average of 20.7%. CCSC works to transform lives, providing hope and a sense of renewed possibility to those facing challenging life circumstances. The organization is not just giving a handout, but giving the resources to overcome barriers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Services, Central and Southwest sites

Basic needs program that provides five day food package, clothing (temporarily suspended), hygiene items and varying levels of rent/utility/medical financial assistance and referrals to the underserved within its 29 zip-code service area. Open 5 or 6 days a week, depending on facility, the program is staffed mainly by trained volunteers who greet, interview, and provide essential services in a caring and respectful manner. In 2019 the program assisted 10,358 unduplicated individuals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Provides disadvantaged Pre-K through 12th grade students in CCSC's 33 zip-code area with a voucher for new school clothing, grade-appropriate school supplies, and gently used clothing and shoes before the school year begins. Families preregister 3 months prior to the distribution event to be sure CCSC secures an adequate amount of items in each grade category and that all children in the family will receive a comprehensive packet. Additional students are served directly through partnering schools with a high percentage of students from low-income families. Volunteers oversee and run the program under the guidance of a part-time Youth Services Manager. Approximately 6,500 students are outfitted each year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

This program is a unique vocational 42-hour training program that equips student to run their own housekeeping businesses. It is also an opportunity for the struggling mother to contribute to household income while still caring for her family. Training is provided in three primary areas: technical skills, personal development, and small business skills. Job leads are provided to help jump-start the graduate's businesses. Since the program's inception in 2003, over 1,900 budding entrepreneurs have graduated from the program.

Population(s) Served

JobNet offers a variety of skill-building services and access to the tools required to search for and obtain gainful and lasting employment. JobNet clients come from a variety of backgrounds and often face challenges in a traditional job search, such as limited computer skills, limited experience, or limited education. The program offers individual job and financial security coaching, skill-building workshops, computer education, and access to business tools such as printers, the internet, and business cards. One of the strongest features of the program is the small, supportive environment that encourages each participant while they navigate the current job market and the ups and downs of searching for employment.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Professional Home Caregiving Training program was initiated in 2020 in response to a perceived need in the community for professional nonmedical caregivers who could tend to older individuals in their home rather than in group facilities. The 50-hr free program equips individuals to work for themselves or an agency. Graduates receive job leads, coaching, and other support.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2020 and 2021 numbers are intentionally low due to COVID-19 social distancing recommendations. We expect volunteer numbers to rise after pandemic concerns ease.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Emergency Services, Central and Southwest sites

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In the Emergency Services programs, duplicated numbers are also tracked because many clients require more than one service in a year. In 2020, clients received a total of 109,544 services.

Number of one-on-one coaching sessions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Unemployed people

Related Program

JobNet

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A staff Success Coach, Financial Coach, and volunteers conduct the sessions. Clients have been served in-person and via Zoom during the pandemic based on client preference.

Number of students served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Back To School

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The program provides a complete package of new school supplies and a voucher for new clothing to disadvantaged children in grades PreK-12th.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Martha's Way

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2020 the pandemic forced in-person class cancellations and halted graduations. Using Zoom, classes were resumed to a limited student basis. In 2021, more classes resumed resulting in more graduates

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCSC is committed to addressing the immediate physical needs of people in crisis and also providing a pathway to greater self-sufficiency. The organization was founded in 1980 as a coalition of churches coming together to meet the needs of the poor in Houston's inner-city community. CCSC's mission has remained steadfast since inception, now including 39 member churches serving 33 Houston zip codes.

-Basic Needs: CCSC strives to assist those who come to its doors in need of crucial every-day living essentials. Volunteers greet, interview, and determine client needs while respecting their dignity and life situation. Depending on need and facility capability, clients may receive a five-day supply of nutritious food (including fresh produce grown in the CCSC Garden, when available), hygiene products, and financial assistance for rent, utilities, or essential medical needs of prescriptions, urgent dental care, and vision care (eye exams/glasses). Clients are also referred to other agencies committed to helping them break the cycle of poverty given their unique family situation.

-Employment: Two employment programs are offered. The Martha's Way program trains low income women and men to begin a residential housekeeping business. Graduates leave the program with the business acumen, connections, and confidence needed for success. The Professional Home Caregiver Training Program provides hands-on vocational training for those interested in pursuing a career in home caregiving. JobNet assists the unemployed and underemployed find gainful work. The program provides skill-building workshops, computer training, job leads, resume development, and one-on-one coaching. CCSC enhances this program through collaborations with other social service agencies providing complimentary services.

-Children: Through partnerships with Houston Independent School District (HISD) and private schools located in high poverty areas, the Louise J. Moran Vision Care Program provides vision screenings to approximately 1,600 - 2,000 needy students annually. From these screenings, professional eye exams and new prescription glasses are furnished to 350- 450 children. The Back To School program strives to supply 6,500 disadvantaged children (Pre-K to 12th grade) with comprehensive school supplies, and a voucher for new school attire. With these tools children are better prepared to achieve academic success and overcome the stigma of poverty. Jingle Bell Express provides 2,500 children from low-income families with new toys and books, addressing both literacy and age-appropriate play. In addition, each family receives a food package for this special time of year.

CCSC is mission focused and client-centric. In addition to the following overarching intentional strategies, each program area develops and follows relevant, targeted program-specific strategies to accomplish its unique goals.

- The ministry's focus is to apply core business principles to the accomplishment of its mission so the agency is returning value to the community in an efficient and effective manner. An engaged 12-member Board of Directors including an experienced Executive Director guides CCSC. The organization's Cultural Values statement guides daily operations, coupled with the best practice of data-influenced decision making.

- Our volunteers' hands are the hands that touch the community and change people's lives. A core practice of the organization is to engage volunteers in every area of the ministry. This practice brings invaluable knowledge and skills to the agency, provides an effective path for individuals to serve, and maximizes CCSC's financial resources.

- CCSC maintains a vigorous relationship with its member churches and partner social-service agencies fostering crucial collaboration and cooperation. Member churches are integral to CCSC's success through financial donations covering administrative costs, supplying hundreds of willing volunteers, and working on multiple steering committees and advisory boards. Each program area depends on partnerships to achieve program goals.

-Staff and volunteers are committed to outstanding stewardship of all resources. CCSC's sustainability is in the relationships that it has cultivated over the years and its reputation as a solidly run non-profit with low operating costs. The organization intentionally maintains diverse funding streams which include foundations, individuals, member churches, corporations, clubs, in-kind gifts, and two fundraising events. Auditors consistently return solid reports demonstrating fiscal stability and well-managed funds. One of its best practices is leveraging vendor partnerships and discounts to keep expenditures low.

CCSC has a proven track record of successfully meeting its goals year after year. Since its inception in 1980, CCSC has prided itself in living up to its mission and core values to deliver basic services with dignity and respect. Using established program policies and procedures, hundreds of volunteers are thoroughly trained and held to high ethical standards while interacting with clients.

CCSC guarantees impartial access to services regardless of race, religion, sex, ethnicity, age, handicap, or sexual orientation. The organization consistently strives to offer high quality services to as many clients as possible, aiming to maximize daily capacity. High client satisfaction ratings validate the extraordinary compassion and care clients experience while receiving services.

From the original six in 1980 to the current 39, member churches have provided significant guidance, spiritual direction, generous funding, numerous volunteers, essential in-kind donations through food, clothing and hygiene product drives, and suitable facilities for program operation. CCSC is especially proud of our recognized ability to recruit, train, engage, and maximize volunteer services. Another significant feature is our ability to minimize administrative costs through volunteerism and securing in-kind donations. For example, in 2021, 1,198 individuals donated 22,011 volunteer hours at an estimated value of $581,750.

CCSC has accomplished its goals in the areas of basic needs, employment, and children's issues. A capital campaign to build a new facility was completed in 2021, which has already enhanced the organization's mission delivery and integration of services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, Enhance volunteer/client experience, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In our Martha's Way Vocational Training program, follow-up calls to graduates indicated a desire for continued learning, agency support, and opportunities for interaction with other alumni. As a result additional continuing education programs were offered (on topics suggested by graduates) and an online list serve linking interested graduates was created.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Christian Community Service Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Christian Community Service Center

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Judy Agee

St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church

Term: 2021 - 2022

Judy Agee

St. Michael Catholic Church

Don Miller

St. John the Divine Episcopal Church

Nathan Wiker

Christ the King Lutheran

Michael Hawes

St. Stephen's Episcopal

Michelle Shonbeck

St. Luke's United Methodist Church

Chris Matlock

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

Larry Vaclavik

St. Theresa Catholic

Jeanie Arnold

River Oaks Baptist

Clint Reiff

Rice Temple Baptist Church

Lana Peralta-Boutwell

Bellaire United Methodist Church

Rebekah Rivera

St. Anne Catholic Church

Stacy Williams

Faith Lutheran Church

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/01/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.