Human Services

Food Bank for Larimer County

Loveland, CO

Mission

At the Food Bank for Larimer County, our mission is to provide food to all in need through community partnerships and hunger-relief programs. Our vision is a hunger-free Larimer County, Colorado.

Ruling Year

1984

Chief Executive Officer

Amy Pezzani

Main Address

5706 Wright Drive

Loveland, CO 80538-8840 USA

Formerly Known As

Food Distribution Center

Keywords

food, foodbank, hunger, poverty, nutrition, hungry, Colorado, seniors, children, disabled, homeless, unemployed, underemployed

EIN

74-2336171

 Number

7393891237

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Map the Meal Gap 2019, an annual Feeding America study, estimates that 38,040 Larimer County residents (including 8,730 children) are "food insecure," meaning they don’t have reliable access to enough food for a healthy, active life. Despite low unemployment, these families are struggling. Wages simply can't keep up with the high cost of living in Larimer County, where rent has increased 40% since 2011 and childcare costs are among the highest in the nation. This creates a series of impossible choices: Pay the rent or buy groceries? Fill a prescription or fill the fruit bowl? Put gas in the car or food in the fridge? Food is such a basic need that not knowing where your next meal is coming from can make it hard to focus on a job or an education, perpetuating a cycle of poverty. Our hunger-relief programs provide fuel so children can do better in school, seniors can maintain their independence and everyone in our community can have an opportunity to thrive.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Fresh Food Share

Nourishing Network

Nutritious Kitchen

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Pounds Distributed (Fiscal Year)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of Produce Distributed (Fiscal Year)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Fresh Food Share

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

All data is for our fiscal year (July 1 - June 30).

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

To keep up with the growing need for food assistance, the Food Bank for Larimer County intends to increase food distribution to 12.5 million meals annually by 2035. Our dream is to provide not just good nutrition, but also health and hope to stabilize the lives of our clients and help them on a path to self-sufficiency.

To achieve the goal of distributing food for 12.2 million meals by 2035, the Food Bank has developed four primary strategies. 1. Increase services to under-served geographic areas identified by our service gap analysis. 2. Plan for population growth by increasing our capacity to source and distribute more food. 3. Increase service to seniors in order to meet the needs of this growing demographic group. 4. Expand participation in our Kids Cafe meal program during the summer months when children don't have access to free or reduced-price school meals.

Founded in 1984, the Food Bank for Larimer County has worked for more than three decades to provide food to all in need. The organization started in a small space furnished with a single card table before moving to a larger facility in 1987 and adding a Loveland location in 2006. Both of those facilities were later expanded (in 2001 and 2011, respectively). In 2018, the Food Bank purchased a third food distribution facility to keep up with a growing population and an increasing need for food assistance. Today, the Food Bank for Larimer County is the only Feeding America clearinghouse for donated food in our area and serves as the County’s central hub for charitable food distribution. Our leadership team is experienced in food banking, fundraising, management, and warehouse operations. A private, nonprofit organization, the Food Bank serves more than 37,000 people and distributes enough food for more than 7.5 million meals annually through our programs and community partners.

As a result of our gap analysis research, the Food Bank set benchmarks and targets for the future designed to 1) close gaps in service and 2) plan for increased need into the future. Based on these two factors, the Food Bank established a 20-year goal to increase the number of meals provided by 2035. In addition to the long-term goal, the Food Bank has established interim goals. The Food Bank also assigned meal goals within program areas to help determine how to reach the final goal of distributing 12.5 million meals annually by 2035.

To help close service gaps, we piloted a Mobile Pantry program in 2016 and have since added new locations to serve even more people. Evaluating those sites and finding new program partners is an ongoing process. In May 2018, our service capacity expanded with the move to a larger distribution facility. This has given us the space to store and distribute more food, although rising food transportation costs (due to a national shortage of CDL drivers) continue to pose a significant challenge. We partnered with Volunteers of America to provide scratch-cooked meals to seniors and continue to explore other options to serve our older neighbors. Our Kids Cafe program piloted a new Food Truck during the summer of 2017. We are working on developing new partnerships and finding additional funds to provide summer meals to even more children in need.

External Reviews

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Affiliations & Memberships

Feeding America

Photos

Financials

Food Bank for Larimer County

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes