EcoViva

Community-led initiatives for a Sustainable Future

aka EcoViva   |   Columbus, GA   |  http://www.ecoviva.org

Mission

EcoViva supports community-led social justice movements in Central America implementing innovative solutions to poverty, environmental degradation, and climate change.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Ana Luisa Moran Ahern

Main address

627 2nd Avenue Suite 5

Columbus, GA 31901 USA

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Formerly known as

Foundation for Self-Sufficiency of Central America (FSSCA)

EIN

74-2935751

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Management & Technical Assistance (Q02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

El Salvador has lost 60% of its forest cover since 1950, and continues to lose mangroves at a rate of 681 hectares per year. Climate change, deforestation, pollution, large scale agricultural development, and overexploitation of natural resources continue to threaten this critical resource. 90% of El Salvador is at risk from climate-related events and 95% of the population lives in areas considered to be extremely vulnerable to climate change threats. These events, including flooding and severe drought conditions, not only threaten fragile ecosystems, but also the livelihoods of thousands of families in vulnerable rural communities whose food security has been affected by severe drought and frequent flooding.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Environmental conservation in El Salvador

EcoViva works with local communities in and around the Bay of Jiquilisco, El Salvador to protect and restore mangrove forests, endangered sea turtle populations, and fisheries.

Population(s) Served

Providing capacity building, technical assistance, and grants to organizations that support small producers in Honduras and El Salvador

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Environmental conservation in El Salvador

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

4,735 acres of mangrove forest are protected by community patrols

Number of released animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Environmental conservation in El Salvador

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Numbers reflect sea turtles released from community-run hatcheries in and around the Bay of Jiquilisco and Barra de Santiago. 2017 was a record year. In May 2015, flooding wiped out the hatchery.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

500 youth have participated in empowerment programs such as literacy promotion, art, theater and community organizing since 2011.

Number of people receiving safe drinking water from community systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since the inception of the program, 15,200 residents now have access to clean drinking water. Water tanks were constructed with support from Rotary Club International and other groups.

Acres of natural habitat restored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Environmental conservation in El Salvador

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Ecological Mangrove Restoration (EMR)

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to help rural Central American communities thrive, building local economies while protecting ecosystems and combatting climate change. We envision vibrant, democratic communities where everyone has the opportunity for education, access to basic services, and a dignified livelihood, and communities who are stewards of their natural resources.

In addition to our ongoing work in El Salvador, for the last five years we have begun to channel funding to similar community-led initiatives in Honduras and Panama. Over time, we seek to grow those relationships into strong and successful partnerships that replicate the success of our work in El Salvador.

We offer direct financial support to our local partner organizations and provide them with ongoing technical assistance with program planning and policy advocacy. We help them build strategic alliances locally and internationally, and recruit skilled volunteers to support their efforts. We also bring dozens of people from the United States to El Salvador each year on Community Empowerment Tours to learn about what's happening and build grassroots support for our work in the United States.

EcoViva leverages a core team of development, program, and marketing professionals, as well as a dedicated Board of Directors, to support our Central American partners' programs financially and technically. Since our founding twenty years ago, we have helped our partners develop and strengthen strategic alliances with academic institutions and foundations in the United States, bringing needed expertise and resources to their initiatives. We connect our partners with national policy initiatives and major international funding streams from which they would be typically excluded otherwise.

- The Bay of Jiquilisco, an important natural site in the area we work in, was designated as El Salvador's largest national protected area (156,000 acres), a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and UN-recognized Ramsar Wetlands site legally co-managed by local communities.

- Over 18,000 residents now have access to clean, low-cost, reliable drinking water thanks to the construction of a community-run water system.

- 4,735 acres of mangrove forest are now protected by regular community patrols

- 1,500,000 endangered sea turtles have been hatched and released into the ocean by local villagers.

- Over 500 composting toilets have been built by villagers and volunteers to decrease groundwater pollution and gastrointestinal illnesses.

- 84 communities are equipped with an Early Warning System for disaster response; 5,500 people in 40 villages safely evacuated after largest floods on record in October of 2011.

- 500 youth have participated in empowerment programs such as literacy promotion, art, theater and community organizing.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

EcoViva
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

EcoViva

Board of directors
as of 1/10/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mary LaPorte

Karina Copen

Nature and Culture International

Jeffrey Haas

Mary LePorte

Erik Schnabel

MEDICC

Eleanor Stein

Albany Law School

Cam Duncan

National Labor College

Lisa Oppenheimer

Eric Oppenheimer Family Foundation

Salvador Menjivar

Beneficial State Bank Foundation

Ed Baron

University of Oklahoma

Nathan Weller

California FarmLink

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes