Animal related

Animal Defense League of Texas

  • San Antonio, TX
  • www.adltexas.org

Mission Statement

Chartered in 1934, the Animal Defense League is a "no-kill," nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for abandoned and abused dogs and cats by providing shelter, medical care, food and safety.  While maintaining a healthy and loving facility, the League consistently works to find the best possible home for each resident animal.

Supported only by voluntary contributions and directed by a volunteer board, the League provides programs and services which strengthen the bond between animals and people.  Through grassroots advocacy, education, legal intervention and rescue, the organization is the leading voice for dogs and cats.

Main Programs

  1. Animals in Crisis Program
  2. Foster Care Program
  3. Volunteer Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

Regarding intake of stray and surrendered dogs and cats, our primary focus is Bexar County and surrounding areas (San Antonio metropolitan area.)  We have adopted to families living in other areas of Texas and even other states, although we adopt primarily to Bexar County residents.  Some of our low-cost spay/neuter clients drive from areas outside Bexar County.

ruling year

1947

Executive Director since 2010

Self-reported

Ms. Janice Darling

Director of Business since 2014

Self-reported

Ms. Anne Meyer

Keywords

Self-reported

pet, dog, cat, puppy, kitten, rescue, animal, ADL, spay/neuter, adopt, humane

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Also Known As

Animal Defense League

EIN

74-6002033

 Number

6595578895

Physical Address

11300 Nacogdoches Road

San Antonio, 78217 2318

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Serving greater San Antonio, a city with a severe pet overpopulation problem with over 300,000 homeless animals where many of these animals face no choice but euthanasia, the Animal Defense League is proud to be the oldest and continuing true no-kill shelter in the area. Abused and abandoned dogs and cats taken in by ADL are medically treated, spayed/neutered, vaccinated, microchipped and, if needed, receive behavior modification training from our in-house trainer and through fostering. No animal is ever euthanized if he or she can be brought back to health or to make room for more animals. Once each animal has received all necessary treatment, the adoption counselors are dedicated to finding the best possible match for every resident cat or dog with a prospective new owner.

 

In 2015, ADL found homes for over 5,000 animals that had been abandoned, abused, neglected or, given the current economic situation, could no longer live with their families.  ADL is a high-volume pet partner with the city's Animal Care Services agency and has been a major factor in increasing the "live-release" rate in San Antonio, as our city strives to become a "no-kill" city. To increase pet retention and access to low-cost care, ADL provides public spay/neuter surgeries, vaccination clinics and wellness clinics where the public can access low-cost heartworm testing and check-ups.

ADL constantly strives to meet the needs of the pet/human bond to decrease pet abandonment and abuse to save more lives.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Animals in Crisis Program

Through this program, ADL is able to bring in ill or injured animals and treat them medically and/or surgically.  At another area shelter, these animals would no doubt be euthanized but have another chance at life through this program.

 

In 2009, ADL was able to treat nearly 2,000 animals ... animals who would otherwise be in pain or crippled and surely would die and horrible death on the streets or in abusive homes.  Because of the espertise of our veterinarian, many of these animals can have orthopedic surgery, which allows them to have a healthy and active life.

 

This is an ongoing program made possible through the generosity of donors and foundations.  Started in 2005, the Animals in Crisis Program has helped thousands of animals in our community.

Category

Animal-Related

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$25,000.00

Program 2

Foster Care Program

ADL's Foster Care Program is the largest and most comprehensive of any shelter in San Antonio.  Neonatal puppies and kittens, with their mothers or as orphans, arrive at ADL needing immediate care.  Our Foster Care Coordinator works with our volunteer foster parents and gets these animals into loving homes until they are ready to be brought in for vaccinating, spaying or neutering and microchipping.  They are then transferred to our adoption kennels, ready to be adopted into their forever homes.

 

All medications, food and supplies are provided to our foster parents ... ADL absorbs all costs for the medications, food and supplies either through its hospital or donations. 

 

In addition, we have initiated a Medical Foster Program for those animals who have undergone surgery and need some recovery time before being transferred to our adoption kennels.  These are primarily adult animals and are sent to foster care so they can recover in a home rather than the hospital.

Category

Animal-Related

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

$0.00

Program 3

Volunteer Program

ADL is very grateful for its legion of volunteers!  The shelter could not operate as efficiently without them.

 

Potential volunteers attend a two-hour orientation meeting, where policies are explained and an overview of the shelter is given.  The resident trainer teaches a short class in appropriate techniques of dog walking.  Volunteers are given myriad opportunities that includes all areas of the shelter, from mobile adoption events to pet therapy and dog walking.

 

The $25 orientation fee covers the cost of handouts and an ADL volunteer tee shirt, along with any incidental expenses incurred by the program.

Category

Animal-Related

Population(s) Served

Adults

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Male Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$0.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    1. ADL's goal is to be the most effective, creative and impactful shelter in San Antonio, fully contributing to a sustainable future as a no-kill city.
    2. Embrace the importance of the pet/human bond offering alternatives to pet surrender through accessible training support and veterinary services.
    3. Eliminate the cycle of pet overpopulation through education on all levels.
    4. Develop unique partnerships to increase our effectiveness as a shelter.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    1. In 2016 ADL's goal is rescue and find homes for 5,500 homeless, abandoned and abused cats and dogs in our community. Over 3,000 of those pets will be rescued directly from the City of San Antonio's Animal Care Services and placed in our Community Shelter Kennels and Puppy Building, built specifically to rescue and house more dogs from ACS' euthanasia lists.

    2. ADL will offer low-cost Wellness Clinics to provide low-cost vaccinations and basic pet care to the public to increase pet retention and decrease pet abandonment.

    3. ADL will continue to develop key partnerships to increase adoptions in 2016 to 5,500.

    4. ADL will continue to run a second permanent adoption location, the "Everyday Adoption Center" at PetSmart, provided by PetSmart Charities, to increase adoptions and public access to our pets.

    5. ADL will continue to strengthen our relationships with the staff at Animal Care Services to maintain our designation as one of the largest high-volume pet partners. This will be achieved through increased communication about specific pet needs, increased pick-up visits and by maintaining experienced Animal Defense League staff who are connected and informed about the rescue process and needs at Animal Care Services.

    6. ADL will continue to support our trainer and the training programs for both our shelter residents and owned pets. The training provided for shelter pets increases their adoptability and provides the best shelter environment possible, based on each pet's individual needs. Access to a professional trainer for pet owners, both ADL adopters and the public, provides low-cost or free assistance to help increase pet retention, assist with problem/resolution and provides the owner an alternative to pet surrender or abandonment.

    7. ADL will develop creative volunteer programs that allow our volunteers to have more impact on our rescued pets and their adoptability.

    8. Participate in humane education partnerships and programs both on and off campus.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    ADL has a dedicated, focused team that continually strategizes on resource use, partnerships, community impact and sustainability, that includes our Board of Directors, staff and volunteers.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    1. City impact information - the number of homeless animals and ACS' Live Release rate
    2. Number of pets rescued annually
    3. Number of public pets that receive low-cost services, including training
    4. Number of pets adopted through ADL
    5. Number of children who receive humane education training
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    We have made significant strides to increase adoptions and rescue more homeless pets in 2015 by increasing key partnerships. We will continue to develop resources and creative partnering to make an even larger imprint on community impact and sustain San Antonio's future as a "no-kill" city.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Texas

Regarding intake of stray and surrendered dogs and cats, our primary focus is Bexar County and surrounding areas (San Antonio metropolitan area.)  We have adopted to families living in other areas of Texas and even other states, although we adopt primarily to Bexar County residents.  Some of our low-cost spay/neuter clients drive from areas outside Bexar County.

Funding Needs

Like all nonprofits in a downturned economy, the Animal Defense League has suffered from a reduction in donations.  Because ADL receives no tax dollars, we rely on fundraising, grants and the generosity of the public in order to continue our mission.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

ANIMAL DEFENSE LEAGUE of TEXAS
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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  • Board Chair and Board Members
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Animal Defense League of Texas

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2015
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Executive Director

Ms. Janice Darling

Director of Business

Ms. Anne Meyer

BIO

Janice joined the Animal Defense League in March 2010. She has over 20 years of nonprofit management and fund raising experience in the San Antonio community.  Janice has always loved animals, nature, and the great outdoors and is delighted to be helping homeless cats and dogs of San Antonio find loving forever homes. She and her husband Gary share their home with six fur children, Sally and Robin, both dogs, and the cats, Kurtie, Misa, Zoey, and Junior.

STATEMENT FROM THE Executive Director

"As Executive Director, I am charged with ensuring that both the day-to-day operations are carried out in a timely and efficient manner, always with compassion and concern for the nearly 500 pets under our care, either onsite here at ADL or in one of our foster care programs. It is fulfilling to be a part of the oldest and continuing no-kill shelter in San Antonio, a tradition that began in 1934 at our creation.
 As the first no-kill shelter in our city, ADL has a strong voice in the welfare of San Antonio's abandoned, abused and neglected dogs and cats. We have a fully staffed hospital, with a complete surgical suite, and a veterinarian who cares for our animals, performs public spay/neuter surgeries on privately owned animals and is a well known orthopedic surgeon.

 I am honored to be a part of this animal welfare leader."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mrs. Anna-Laura Howell Block

TEHCO

Term: Mar 2009 - Mar 2010

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?