Community Food Bank

Feeding Familes and Feeding Hope !

Fort Worth, TX   |  www.food-bank.org

Mission

To fight hunger and poverty by providing food, education, programs and resources to families in a dignified, personal and expeditious manner directly as a food pantry and as a food bank; without zip code restrictions.

Ruling year info

1982

Principal Officer

Mrs. Regena Lynn Taylor

Main address

3000 Galvez Ave

Fort Worth, TX 76111 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-1813170

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rapid Food Distribution to low income families

Community Food Bank (CFB): Now in its 39th year, the mission of CFB is to fight hunger and poverty by providing food, education, programs, and resources to families in a dignified, personal, and timely manner without zip code restrictions. CFB is committed to providing education and resources to families, directly as a food pantry; and to other non-profit food pantries as a food bank. CFB is the only nonprofit agency in North Texas to fill both roles with no zip code restrictions. CFB serves approximately 94,000 individuals and families annually, as well as over 30 human-service agencies. CFB was able to serve children and families with more than 10 million pounds of food in 2020.
Rapid Food Distribution Program: The goal is to distribute highly nutritious food to low-income individuals and families experiencing food insecurity; and to provide training opportunities to assist low-income individuals and ex-offenders in attaining workforce skills and employment.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Community Food Bank serves low-to-moderate income individuals and families in North Texas, with no zip code restrictions. CFB serves a multi-racial, low-income population with a household income, which is at or below 125% of the federal poverty guidelines. Demographics include 39% African American, 38% Hispanic, 21% Caucasian, and 2% other. Most are single parents. Many are at-risk, needing food assistance, transportation and basic needs. Cross-section of families currently served: 46% unemployed; 54% underemployed; 58% women; 2% homeless; and 20% seniors.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As a result of community feedback, we will be able to expand food delivery to remote locations that are not served by existing food pantries. We will also be able to enhance our career training and development programs for ex-offenders and provide a job referral service.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Community Food Bank Board and staff conduct an annual assessment to determine community needs. We are located in the heart of the homeless services area in near east Fort Worth, TX. Therefore, we are making a difference by serving this special population who may be staying at a homeless shelter, or who move from place to place and still need food to get them through the day or week. The CFB does not have zip code restrictions and will accept all ID’s, so we do not discriminate. Thus, we can and do serve a variety of people who are in need of emergency food including refugees and we see many families that have come to the U.S. to work or attend school.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Community Food Bank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Community Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 12/03/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Gwen Morrison, Ph.D.

Tarrant County College

Suzette Jolley

FedEx Supply Chain

Donna Burch

Bell Flight

Vernon Evans

Retired DFW Airport Executive

Rev. Ruben Garcia

Christian Heritage Ministries International

Minnie Hadley

Sonshine Girls House of Peace

Ruben Rodriguez

Wood Forest National Bank

Andrew Walker, Ph.D.

Amon Carter Museum

Di Wright

Retired Orthopedic Nurse

Rayfield Wright

NFL Hall of Fame

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/3/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data