AIRLINE AMBASSADORS INTERNATIONAL INC

Travelling to Make a Difference

aka AAI   |   Califon, NJ   |  www.airlineamb.org

Mission

Airline Ambassadors leverage contacts with the airline industry to provide medical escorts for children, hand deliver humanitarian assistance to children and educate and advocate for human trafficking awareness in the travel industry.

Notes from the nonprofit

Please review our website at www.airlineamb.org for a more complete description of our activities. Airline Ambassadors has grown from a few flight attendants to several thousand. AAI is a membership organization that now has many people from different professions, including medical, law enforcement, military, construction and housewives. Airline personnel members share their travel privileges to our other members to travel to do good throughout the world.

Ruling year info

1997

President

Ms. Nancy Rivard

Communications

Kate Jewell PhD

Main address

138 Winding Brook Lane 7 A

Califon, NJ 07830 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-2679444

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Exchanges (Q23)

International Relief (Q33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Airline Ambassadors is the only charity leveraging contacts with the airline industry to help vulnerable children We are doing that through our three programs: Serving the medical needs of children by arranging transport and and volunteer companions to the US for donated medical care. Serving the needs of children at our adopted projects in the Philippines, Colombia, Guatemala, Haiti, Nepal and S. Africa by coordinating regular missions to hand deliver food, clothing, school and hygiene items and ultimately to support their education by providing educational sponsorship's for the children we visit. With our human trafficking training program we are meeting a need for training in the aviation/travel industry on this critical human rights problem that is happening right in front of our eyes at airports. Training aviation personnel can save thousands of lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Children's Medical Escort Program

This program provides volunteer escorts to children coming to the US for donated medical care. We provide about 10 life changing escorts per month.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Humanitarian Missions
AIRLINE AMBASSADORS coordinates missions every month where members
hand deliver medical supplies, first aid kits, school supplies, clothing, blankets,
and medicine to refugee camps, orphanages, clinics, schools, and remote communities.
We also provide opportunities for medical professionals, teachers,
builders, and travelers of all ages and professions to share their unique skills
and expertise to benefit local communities. In 2010, we delivered $2.1 Million of
humanitarian aid, directly impacting an estimated 92,000 children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Children’s Escort Program
AIRLINE AMBASSADORS contracts with various adoption agencies and nonprofits
to provide volunteer escorts for children in need of medical care not
available in their home countries or for orphans going to their new homes.
These Airline Ambassadors are airline personnel who use their flight privileges
to provide a loving and capable adult companion for these disadvantaged children
at a fraction of the cost to adoption agencies, health care partners or individuals
requiring our service. In 2012 we escorted 265 children, representing
8,921 service hours. In 2013 we escorted 954 children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Education and Advocacy

Human Trafficking Awareness
AIRLINE AMBASSADORS developed the first training on human trafficking awareness tailored specifically for the airline and travel industry. AAI provides
a team of four trainers to present a 90 minute training at airports or other locations with handouts and scenarios as well as pre and post assessments,
wallet cards and handouts. Training's include stories from a survivor of human trafficking as well as stories of flight attendants and others who have identified trafficking in real case scenarios. AAI is the chief advocate in the travel industry for awareness of this fast growing crime.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Paul Harris Fellow 2005

Rotary Club

Congressional Record, Tom Lantos 2003

U. S. Congress

Congressional Record, Chris Smith 2012

U. S. Congress

Congressional Record, Jackie Speires 2013

U. S. Congress

Kiwanis International Global Service Award 2001

Kiwanis International

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have the ability to seek help from and respond appropriately to adults

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Children's Medical Escort Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Provided over 3,000 Child escorts which include hospital treatment and flights since 1997

Total number of conferences held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Education and Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Provided the only peer-to-peer human trafficking awareness training for the airline industry as requested by airport management and U.S. State Department, Interpol and UNODC

Number of contracts/purchase agreements that the organization holds for purchase of its products/services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Education and Advocacy

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fee for service to providing human trafficking awareness training to from line professionals in the airline industry.

Total number of off-site performances held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Humanitarian Missions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Provided humanitarian missions to 9 countries. Humanitarian missions provided school tuition and other child services to local orphanages

Number of industry standards/practices developed by nonprofit

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Education and Advocacy

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AAI continues to lead human trafficking awareness training for the airline industry. AAI influenced the International Air Transport Association (IATA), ICAO and TVPA reauthorizations in Congress

Number of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Education and Advocacy

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Over 7,000 front line personnel, including law enforcement, have been trained in over 110 global airport trainings about counter human trafficking identification

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To provide child protective, welfare and educational services to children of the world. To extend AAI’s humanitarian services to families in need of economic security. including providing clean, fresh drinking water. To sustain all projects initiated or undertaken. To profoundly reduce the incidence of child trafficking around the world by making human trafficking reduction the major concern of the transport industry.

Leverage airline industry and transport contacts to influence human trafficking reduction. Promote substantial voluntary membership to conduct missions and engage in projects. Increase the inclusion of members from a more diverse realm of experiences. Disperse our mission mandate into the local ground transport industry. Expand inflight media PSAs. Expand social media information.

AAI has been operating as the only charity of the airline industry for over 20 years.

Our Children's Medical Escort and Humanitarian programs have continued to impact over 500,000 children and delivering over $60M of humanitarian assistance.

We have demonstrated ability to implement over $1 M in grants for UNICEF and Minustah in Haiti after one of the worst humanitarian disasters in history. Due to our partnership with US Army Southern Command, we were assigned to disperse "tail landing slots" for commercial air carriers as we insured these aircraft would only transport a DOD approved list of essential emergency supplies. AAI thus assisted virtually all NGO's conducting early disaster assistance. AAI was additionally able to procure over 17 Boeing 767 freight aircraft for it's own missions. The aircraft were filled with only DOD approved emergency supplies and personnel.

Our incredible track record of 130 Airport training and presentations on human trafficking awareness to 7,000 front line aviation employees have enabled the effective scanning of 16.8 MILLION passengers. Our efforts have resulted in 0ver 1000 tips of potential trafficking situations.

AIRLINE AMBASSADORS INTERNATIONAL
Has escorted over 3,000 children ffor life saving medical
Hand delivered over $60 Million in humanitarian aid impacting 500,000 children
Provided training to 7000 front line airline personnel on human trafficking awareness

Typically, relief and development organizations restrict
donor involvement to contributions, while making exceptions for high donors. They also rely on highly paid
humanitarian professionals who restrict project visitation by ordinary citizens. While certain projects might
certainly warrant such protocol, we believe that people from all walks of life have skills to offer in making communities whole again. Volunteers bring unique aspects that enrich personal relationships with the people they serve. The additional human resources we enable bridge vital gaps in assistance shortfalls that are increasingly apparent everywhere. While there is not an abundance of resources in an increasing number of communities, there is an abundance of human spirit that we are placing, leveraging and nurturing.

The AAI model to enable volunteerism provides a “continuity of care” element, which is emblematic of Airline Ambassadors projects in 62
countries. The key concept, is the concept of volunteerism, where one can never predict what course of humanitarian action might take.

General Pagan, Commander of U. S. SOCSOUTH, said "Airline Ambassadors delivers relationship, which is perhaps the most important component of our foreign aid."

We plan to expand our work and our partnerships with UNODC and US Army Southern Command. We need sustainable income to hire a competent and experienced Executive Director

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve communities in seven countries on an ongoing basis and we solicit their feedback and ideas on how we can best support them.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We took a survey of all our members to see which programs they were most interested in - The children's Medical Escort Program, the Humanitarian Missions Program or Human Trafficking Awareness. We also asked if they were interested in continuing the Virtual Missions which we had adapted during covid. We used their responses, and similar responses from our In Country Coordinators in shaping our Strategic Plan.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have always asked for feedback from those we serve to assess whether we are accomplishing our mission and report that in our Annual Report, written after the annual audit.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

AIRLINE AMBASSADORS INTERNATIONAL INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AIRLINE AMBASSADORS INTERNATIONAL INC

Board of directors
as of 11/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms Nancy Rivard

Airline Ambassadors International

Term: 1997 - 2020


Board co-chair

Mx. Mary Wotanis

Treasurer

Term: 2020 - 2025

Christina Andersen

Secretary

Mary Wotanis

Treasurer

David Rivard

Chris Hansen

Kate Jewell

Nancy Rivard

President

Donna Hubbard

Andrea Hobart

Airline Ambassadors International

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/20/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Non-binary, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.