Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, Inc.

Immigrant Rights Are Human Rights

aka HRI   |   Dallas, TX   |  http://www.HRIonline.org

Mission

Human Rights Initiative of North Texas (HRI) exists to serve immigrants who have suffered human rights abuses with free legal support and social services.

Notes from the nonprofit

Over the last year, we have shifted to a more democratic decision- making model, centered in staff-led committee recommendations and full-staff consensus processes. We formulated committees as staff, designating them either standing or ad hoc (to solve a time-bound issue). Each individual staff member may chair no more than one committee at a time, and each committee must represent a range of internal departments and roles. Committees include Pay Equity Committee, Onboarding committee, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Team, and ad hoc Hiring committees. We also handle some decision-making as a full staff through consensus processes, which often include thinking periods, opportunity for written comment, anonymous polling, and facilitated discussion. We rotate facilitation of our weekly staff meetings (during which decision-making occurs), so that the power to set agendas and facilitate meetings is shared across the staff.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Mr. Bill Holston

Main address

2801 Swiss Avenue

Dallas, TX 75204 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-2842602

NTEE code info

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Immigrants' Rights (R21)

Legal Services (I80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The monumental triumph of escaping abusive environments often demands everything from survivors. By the time they reach American soil, immigrants may possess little more than the will to build a new life. Even the most fortunate among them may be ill-equipped to navigate the difficult legal process that awaits, let alone provide for themselves and their loved ones. Our clients are asylum seekers fleeing persecution and torture, crime victims seeking safety, and children who have been abandoned, abused, or neglected. They don’t want a hand out. They need a helping hand. Without it, choices and opportunities dwindle, and we all suffer the loss of the potential each person held. Immigrants without support and legal representation fare poorly in our system. We provide free, expert legal services and transitional social support to assist immigrants fleeing abuse in achieving legal status in the United States.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Asylum Program

Provide legal and social services for asylum seekers fleeing persecution on the basis of race, religion, political belief, nationality, or membership in a particular social group.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Assist immigrant crime victims in obtaining U Visas and survivors of violence eligible under the Violence Against Women Act in achieving legal status in the US. Provide support for eligible clients to apply for legal employment authorization.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse

Provide legal and social services for immigrant children who have been abused, abandoned, or neglected by one or both parents.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Immigrants and migrants
Low-income people
Victims of crime and abuse

HRI Legal Program clients and their families are eligible for comprehensive social services support, including individual and group case management, guidance and referral, and material support.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth
Victims of crime and abuse

HRI’s Advocacy Program is premised on the principle that our clients should drive how our organization prioritizes the structural problems we address.

HRI Connect/Conexión HRI is a multilingual English/Spanish/French space where current and former HRI clients come together to discuss collective problems, strategize about a shared vision for the future, and make decisions about tactics about how to achieve that vision. The group meets in full once a month and throughout the month in formal and informal committees. The program is new, coming out of an effort that began in 2019 to build a program to center the folks that HRI serves in decision-making and strategy about systemic change work.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Board of Immigration Appeals - Accreditation 2006

Awards

Pro Bono Agency of the Year (State of Texas) 2007

State Bar of Texas

Arthur C. Helton Award-AILA's highest award in advancing the cause of human rights, 2008

American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA)

Pro Bono Hero 2013

American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA)

Louise B. Raggio Award 2013

State Bar of Texas Women and Law Section

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of clients we serve varies year-to-year and is influenced by backlogs, case complexity, and other factors. We provide dedicated, free services, so more is not always better.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our model combines on-staff expertise with pro bono attorneys and other volunteers to get highest quality service at no cost to clients. The number of volunteers needed varies.

Number of attorney volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of pro bono attorneys expands and contracts to meet our clients' needs. Sometimes, more of the work needs to be done in-house.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At HRI, we help indigent immigrants who have overcome human rights abuses to avail themselves of the humanitarian protections provided by our laws. Combined with the transitional social services we offer, we understand our work as helping to forge a path to safety, stability, and opportunity for the courageous, resilient immigrants we serve.

We also advocate and hope to educate the general public about the rights and challenges of immigrants who have suffered human rights abuses.

At HRI, we believe human rights should be guaranteed and human dignity should be diligently protected. We envision a country that empowers immigrants and welcomes them into our communities and hearts.

All of our clients live at or below 150% of federal poverty guidelines, and all of our services are completely free.

Our model is innovative and effective: we have a small staff of legal and social service professionals with expertise in our practice areas. We recruit, train, and provide oversight and support for hundreds of volunteer attorneys, psychologists, doctors, translators, and others, leveraging every dollar donated to provide up to $4 in services. We conduct 4-8 continuing legal education programs a year and as many as 3 Know Your Rights presentations a week. Each of our legal departments is staffed by an attorney and legal assistant who continually educate themselves and practice in their fields, seeking out collaboration and strategic partnerships where advantageous. Our volunteers bring resources and expertise of their own.

Each potential client's case is reviewed by an intake manager, then an attorney, then our entire staff. This rigorous screening helps us explore legal eligibility and anticipate the requirements of meeting the legal standard. Similarly, our social services case managers interview each client, checking in quarterly to ensure that clients have access to the community resources necessary to support them in achieving first stability, then their full potential. We have referring partnerships with more than 140 service agencies in the area, and follow up as needed until our clients' cases close.

With a small staff of 16 and the support of approximately 413 volunteers, we are able to assist hundreds of clients each year. We partner with more than dozens of social service agencies and can provide referrals for services we do not ourselves have the capacity to provide. We participate in coalitions of pro bono attorneys and nonprofits working in the immigration arena, and enjoy the support of individual donors and foundations to fund our efforts.

For 20 years, we have provided excellent legal and social services at no cost to thousands of asylum seekers, abused children, and crime victims. Every client served affects uncounted lives. We are proud of this legacy, even as we continually strive to better serve our clients and influence our community towards protection of human rights and dignity.

Financials

Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Alan Wright

Elizabeth Healy

Harold Simmons Foundation

Greg Curry

Holland & Knight

Natalie Nanasi

Director, Center for Victims of Crimes Against Women, SMU Dedman School of Law

Ashlie Alaman

Starbucks

Alan Wright

Kilpatrick Townsend

Kelly Rogers

JP Morgan

Justin Banta

Callier Center for Communications Disorders

Anita Kelley

Morgan Stanley

Eric Renner

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Carolyn Ruiz

Office of Civil Rights, Department of Education

Betty Yang

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher

Komlan Lakpassa

TIAA CREF

Jonathan Davis

The Outreach Team

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/11/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.