Project Hope Alliance

Ending the cycle of homelessness, one child at a time.

aka Project Hope Alliance   |   Costa Mesa, CA   |  www.projecthopealliance.org

Mission

The mission of Project Hope Alliance (PHA) is to end the cycle of homelessness, one child at a time. PHA's mission is child-centric – focused on providing holistic support to children experiencing homelessness, offering crucial educational support and basic needs services and connecting families to permanent housing agencies, so their children are able to focus 100% on school and building bright futures. Our main programs operate through site-based case management, providing K-6th grade students with adult mentors and technology to raise their academic achievement to grade level, and providing 7th grade - age 24 youth with enrichment opportunities and basic needs to ensure high school graduation and financial self-sufficiency.

Ruling year info

2003

CEO

Jennifer Friend

Main address

1954 Placentia Avenue Suite 202

Costa Mesa, CA 92627 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Project HOPE School Foundation

EIN

75-3099628

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

Housing Search Assistance (L30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Child homelessness is a significant issue in Orange County and throughout the country. It is often a hidden societal issue because it "looks" different than the homelessness most people see on the streets. The McKinney-Vento Act defines "homeless children and youth" as individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence. On a national level, there has been a significant increase in the number of homeless children in the last 10 years. In Orange County, there are more than 29,000 homeless school-aged children. During a 10-year period from 1994 to 2014, the number of students encountering homelessness in Orange County skyrocketed 236%. The vast majority (90%) are doubled or tripled-up with others due to economic hardship. They are also staying in motels, shelters, cars, or public spaces. Lack of stable, secure housing negatively affects a homeless child's performance in school, their health, their self-confidence, and their emotional and behavioral health.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Elementary Program

Launched in Fall 2015, our innovative Elementary Program equips the K-6 children we serve with the skills, knowledge, and mentoring needed to enter a classroom and excel. Combining Imagine Learning academic curriculum with inspirational curriculum, the program pairs elementary-age children with supportive volunteer mentors who help guide them through a unique experience designed to inspire our young learners. Each student receives a laptop with built-in WiFi and a Mobile Hotspot, creating an enduring partnership between the child and learning that remains with the student wherever he or she goes, from classroom to home. Parents and families learn how to best advocate for academic success via monthly collective quarterly "Parent Empowerment" events.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Homeless people

Our High School & Youth Program serves disconnected youth ages 13-24. The program was developed by the Latin American Youth Center (LAYC) of Washington, D.C., and has been highly successful for the past eight years, leading to support from organizations such as the Clinton Global Initiative. Project Hope Alliance is one of only two other organizations nationwide chosen to execute this program. We work in partnership with LAYC, and locally, with Newport-Mesa Unified School District, OC Department of Education, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church (located across the street from Newport Harbor High School; they provide a drop-in service center, snack bar, and study space), and various organizations that provide educational, counseling, and vocational resources. Students facing homelessness are identified by school staff and referred to our on-site case managers for screening and enrollment into the program. Within the program, students are served with basic needs resources, including clothing, food, hygiene products, and transportation assistance, as well as enrichment opportunities and academic support, including assistance with college applications and academic tutoring, field trips, financial assistance for after school programs, and social-emotional development.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Homeless people

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2018

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours Spent Mentoring Elementary Children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our students thrive from the opportunity of having an additional caring adult and mentor to encourage their educational and social-emotional growth, as many of their parents work full-time jobs.

Percent Of Parents Who Feel That The Bright Start Program Has Contributed To Academic Gains For Their Children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Elementary Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children in the Bright Start Program advanced 3/4 of a school year in english and almost a full school year in math and science.

Percent Of Parents and Teachers Who Affirm That The Program Has Contributed To Social & Emotional Growth For Their Children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Elementary Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% of parents would recommend the Bright Start Program to another parent/family at Project Hope Alliance. 100% of mentors report that the program has positively affected their lives.

Graduation Rates for our High School Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, At-risk youth

Related Program

High School & Youth Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth without a high school diploma are 346% more likely to face homelessness as an adult. The ultimate goal for our high school program is to ensure graduation.

Percent Of Families Moved Out Of Homelessness Who Achieved Both Financial Stability & Stable Housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Non-adult children

Related Program

Elementary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A caring adult is critical to a youth's ability to succeed, the Promotor Pathway Program focuses on cultivating and maintaining a lasting, trusting relationships with the youth served.

Number Of Mentoring Sessions With Children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Elementary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since the initial launch of the Bright Start Program in October 2015 until the end of April 2017.

Number Of Individuals Served Through Our Family Stability Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2016 total reflects our 2017 fiscal year numbers. Since 2012, we have moved more than 850 children and their parents out of homelessness and into safe, stable, permanent homes.

Average Cost To House A Family

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2016 total reflects our 2017 fiscal year numbers. This amount includes security deposit and first month's rent.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Project Hope Alliance is a purpose-driven organization with twin goals: assisting needful families during homelessness and eliminating obstacles that prevent homeless children from attending and excelling in school. Youth desperately need access to education if they are to avoid homelessness as adults. We are committed to providing homeless children and youth from kindergarten through age 24 with the tools and opportunities that they need to learn their way to a better tomorrow. In this work, we have spent the last 30 years developing unique and effective education program models that serve the needs of homeless children in Orange County.

Project Hope Alliance has two main programs to achieve our goals—our Elementary Program and High School & Youth Program. Our programing development and implementation is based upon the premise that the futures of homeless children should not be limited by their parents' economic circumstances. Strategically, we utilize education, transportation, after-school care, personal enrichment, and "play" opportunities to provide a foundation for healthy development and growth. We are eliminating the barriers to academic success and cognitive development created by the circumstances of childhood homelessness in order to ensure that the future of our children does not contain adult homelessness.

As one of the only Orange County nonprofits operating under the McKinney-Vento definition of homelessness and one of very few homeless service providers that are entirely privately funded, Project Hope Alliance is unique in our focus on supporting the holistic development of homeless children and youth. We work collaboratively within our programs and with partners in the community to deliver on this model and walk alongside the children and families we support to end the cycle of homelessness. In addition, we are involved in advocacy for homeless children at a local, regional, and national level. We have a bold vision and commitment to deepening and growing impact. We know where we are headed and what we need to do to get there. With community support and investment and partnership of other organizations, we can deliver on our Strategic Plan and be the solution in Orange County and a model for the nation in ending the cycle of homelessness, one child at a time. We have experienced exponential growth over the last 5 years, with revenue keeping pace with expenses. While we are proud of the growth we have already accomplished, we also recognize that we need to build capacity and put more systems and structure in place to position our organization for the future.

Project Hope Alliance was formed in 1989 to support the transportation needs of homeless children attending the Project HOPE School (now Skyview Elementary). The project grew out of a school teacher's passion for assisting local homeless children with their education—with her car serving as the first classroom. This personal outreach program soon became an organized undertaking called Project HOPE, which stood for "Homeless Outreach Program in Education." It grew to become a county-run school designed to help children without permanent homes transition into the mainstream educational system. The First Presbyterian Church of Orange also served as a key partner of the program for 20+ years, providing the facilities and many other invaluable operational services to the school. Under the leadership of current CEO Jennifer Friend since 2012, we have grown from serving 1 school with less than 65 children to supporting more than 400 children attending 91 different schools in 31 cities throughout Orange County. Since 2012, we have moved more than 850 children and parents out of homelessness.

For the next 3-5 years, our strategic focus is to deepen and grow our impact in Orange County while simultaneously building a model for the nation in ending the cycle of homelessness, one child at a time. To execute, we will leverage our strong team, commitment to mission and values, and the power of a shared direction. This shared vision focuses our efforts on 3 things: expanding our programs to more campuses in Orange County, investing in our creative team to increase visibility of our organization, and building a model through systems development and advocacy work. It also prepares our organization for future growth and development, beginning with PHA staff, board of directors, and community partners. Our Strategic Plan includes these 6 strategic initiatives that will guide our work in the first year of implementation.

Financials

Project Hope Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Project Hope Alliance

Board of directors
as of 8/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lynn Hemans

The Hershey Company

Term: 2016 -

Lynn Hemans

Taco Bell

Joe Lewis

Claire Trevor School of the Arts, University of California at Irvine

Eric Rans

Michelman & Robinson, LLP

Ray Weston

Taco Bell

April Negrete

USI Insurance Services

Sean Boulton

Newport Harbor High School

Pete Deutschman

The Buddy Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/26/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.