Union Gospel Mission of Tarrant County

We are God’s healthy place to end homelessness, one person at a time.

aka UGM-TC   |   Fort Worth, TX   |  www.ugm-tc.org

Mission

Union Gospel Mission of Tarrant County is a local united Christian organization and ministry dedicated to providing love, hope, respect, and a new beginning to the homeless.  UGM-TC offers a holistic program of care that leads to true, lasting healing.

Ruling year info

1966

President/CEO

Mr. Don Shisler

Main address

PO Box 1957

Fort Worth, TX 76101 USA

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Formerly known as

Union Gospel Mission of Fort Worth

EIN

75-6054677

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Ambulatory Health Center, Community Clinic (E32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Union Gospel Mission of Tarrant County is addressing the issue of Homelessness in Tarrant County and surrounding North Texas areas. UGM-TC is addressing the root causes of homelessness for each individual or family that joins our residency program. Through recovery programs, life skills classes, chapel services and the personal attention of our dedicated staff, men, women, and families will be able to start a new, independent life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Healing Shepherd Clinic

A study done by University of North Texas’ School of Public Health, as well as a  Star-Telegram news series, brought to light the desperate situation faced by the homeless in our community who are without access to rudimentary health care. Too many of them are women and children.
Union Gospel Mission of Tarrant County’s Healing Shepherd Clinic opened in late 2008 to provide free primary medical and preventive services to the Mission residents and guests. Following the model of Volunteers in Medicine, an international organization dedicated to providing health care for all people, Healing Shepherd Clinic relies on volunteer physicians, nurses, clerical and support staff. 

A specially licensed Family Practice Nurse Practitioner provides accessible, compassionate care for men and women and oversees daily operations of the clinic. 

Healing Shepherd Clinic provides a needed service to both the homeless population and to the community at large by taking pressure off local emergency rooms which are currently the indigent person’s only option for care; as well as reducing the hospital’s financial burden.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Union Gospel Mission Family Center is a 26-room facility designed to meet the needs of homeless women with children. Each mother and their child/children have their own room. An intake assessment is completed on each family group to identify barriers that resulted in homelessness. Based on this assessment a case management plan is developed. Referrals are provided to a variety of programs offered on site as well as in the community. On site agencies include All Church Home for Children Care Program, which provides individual and family counseling, MHMR assessments, and Recovery Resource Council substance abuse assessments. Employment services are offered through Project Wish, a collaboration with Workforce Solutions of Tarrant County.
Residents in the Family Center participate in Stress Management and Parenting classes, Employment Workshops; and ALPHA a spiritual development class, all offered on site. Residents’ school age children participate in the Union Gospel Mission Children’s Enrichment Program, which provides after school tutoring, Rainbow Days Christian based program for children to teach coping skills, and Recovery Resource Council Sunshine Club.

Population(s) Served
Families

An assessment with a case manager is required for entrance into the residence program. The assessment identifies the barriers that led to the individual’s homelessness; and is utilized to develop an individualized case management plan. Participants in both programs are encouraged to avail themselves of the following services offered on site: MHMR – mental health evaluations, Recovery Resource Council- substance abuse assessments, Project Wish- employment workshops and intensive case management for assistance in overcoming employment barriers. Alcoholics’ Anonymous groups, Celebrate Recovery, and Spiritual Development programs are also available.
Many residents are referred to the Tarrant County College learning center to obtain their GED and for educational assessment to enter The Visions Program, which is a partnership with Tarrant County College, Workforce Solutions and Union Gospel Mission. Through the Visions Program, residents attend Tarrant County College and receive supportive services to assist them into transitioning into a college setting.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys

The Women’s Program requires each individual to work out a personal program for change with their case manager. A wide spectrum of help is available: schooling – from GED to college courses, counseling, drug and alcohol assessment and treatment, legal advocacy, life skills and anger management classes are just a few of the opportunities available for our residents.  As participants in Project WISH, a part of the Texas Workforce Commission, many of our residents have found jobs and are on the way to self-sufficiency. Women with children are also provided with parenting classes as well as day care and baby sitting as necessary for their classes, job search and employment.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Where we work

Awards

Betty McIlroy, Social Worker of the Year 2010

National Association of Social Workers, Fort Worth Chapter

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

God's healthy place to end homelessness, one person at a time.

Providing love, hope and respect and a new beginning for the homeless in Tarrant County.

Financials

Union Gospel Mission of Tarrant County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Union Gospel Mission of Tarrant County

Board of directors
as of 2/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Mary Jane Edwards

Community Volunteer

Term: 2019 -


Board co-chair

Mr. Larry Chilton

Frost Bank

Term: 2019 -

Otis Lemley

Retired, Lemley Insurance Agency

Bill Bailey

Frank Bailey Grain Company

Carl Brumley

Higginbotham & Associates

Robert Keffler

Murphy, Mahon, Keffler and Farrier

Columba Reid

Retired, M.J. Neeley & Co

Ronald Clinkscale

CPA

John Mitchell

Apartment Association of Tarrant County

Peter Philpott

Robert W. Baird & Co

Terry Montesi

Trademark Property Co.

Larry Eason

Consultant

JD Stotts

Whitley Penn

Gene Gray

Frost Bank

Nicole Brown

Community Volunteer

Eddie Broussard

Texas Capital Bank

Crawford Gupton

McKnight Title

Barcus Hunter

Attorney

Caroline Samis

Frost Bank

W. White

First Command Bank

JW Wilson

Roxo Energy

Robbie Zimmerman

Fortis Minerals

Charles Allen

Morrison Supply

Terrance Butler

Academy4

Mike Gonzales

All Saints Episcopal School

Julie Siratt

Community Volunteer

Allison Wagner

Community Volunteer

Toni Meadows

Samaritan's Purse

Emily Radler

Community Volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data