Religion, Spiritual Development

ServLife International, Inc.

aka ServLife

Indianapolis, IN

Mission

ServLife International propels reconciliation and justice by building global community to plant churches, care for children and fight poverty.

Ruling Year

1993

Executive Director

Mr. Adam Nevins

Main Address

PO Box 20596

Indianapolis, IN 46220 USA

Keywords

Christian, Missions, Indigenous church, Relief & Development, Children, Pastor, Training, Equipping, Micro-Finance, Micro-Loan

EIN

76-0363452

 Number

1872602843

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Protestant (X21)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Religious Leadership, Youth Development (O55)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Planting churches

Caring for children

Fighting poverty

Where we workNew!

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Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of donors retained

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

2015 donor retention rate was 66%. Not counting 2014 new donors (which include a lot of donors funding their friend's mission trip), the retention rate jumps to 82%.

Number of new donors

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

The main bump in new donor activity in 2015 was from Nepal Earthquake Relief donors.

Number of clients served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

This is the number of pastors, children and micro-finance families in the programs. It does not include church attenders for individual family members in the micro-finance program.

Number of overall donors

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Both the number of donors and the amount of revenue have doubled from 2012 to 2015.

Average number of dollars received per donor

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Despite doubling our donor base in 4 years, average giving per donor has continued to slowly climb.

Number of students enrolled

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

This is the number of children in the education sponsorship program.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

VISION AND MISSION
ServLife International envisions the Gospel bringing spiritual and physical restoration and healing in the most marginalized regions in the world. Our mission is to propel reconciliation and justice by building global community to plant churches, care for children and fight poverty.

TARGET
Our current operations focus in North India and Nepal. Special focus is given to impoverished regions and villages. Future countries of focus will be adjacent to existing countries of work and remain within the 10/40 window.

FIVE YEAR GOALS
1. PLANT CHURCHES
a. Empower and equip 150 new pastors and plant as many churches in India and Nepal.
b. Provide ongoing training and equipping for 500 pastors and lay leaders.

2. CARE FOR CHILDREN
a. Stabilize funding for the current 300 children (and 5 orphanages) in our programs to continue to receive food, shelter, care and education.
b. Finalize funding for the two new orphanages and complete construction.
c. Launch our first ServLife school in West Nepal.
d. Add 200 new children to our programs to total 500 children.

3. FIGHT POVERTY
a. Provide support and oversight for the existing 30 micro-loans and ensure that they are paid off on time.
b. Ensure that all paid off loans are renewed with new recipients.
c. Raise funds and launch the micro-finance program in 5 new villages.
d. Launch 100 new micro-loans ($300-800 typically).

FIVE YEAR STRATEGIES
1. PLANT CHURCHES
a. Our training center in India and our training center in Nepal will work together to train 25-30 pastors each year. This training rate has been sustained for the last 5 years and should prove conservative moving forward.
b. At our annual conference, all trained leaders are invited to come together for 3-4 days of extended training and equipping. This training is led by leaders in India, Nepal and the USA, and provides practical training as well as inspirational encouragement.

2. CARE FOR CHILDREN
a. Funding for this program has been low the last 3 years but picked up in 2013. 160 of the 300 children are sponsored, with over 50 new sponsorships in 2013. A local church has also agreed to provide all the funding needed for a new orphanage in Nepal. Our newly launched online child sponsorship module (https://servlife.org/sponsorachild/) has helped to increase support.
b. Two churches in the USA have agreed to provide the necessary funding for both of the new orphanages.
c. Our Nepal Children's Director is working in a local community to launch our first independent school.
d. Through events, advocate home events and online marketing we should easily sponsor 50 new children each year.

3. FIGHT POVERTY
a. New hires to oversee the micro-finance program should ensure timely loan payments and accurate field reporting.
b. New staff will oversee that loans are paid off and renewed to new recipients.
c. Existing and new partnerships in the USA will provide funding for launching the micro-finance program in 5 new villages in 5 years, raising $5,000 - $10,000 per village for launch.
d. These new villages will be able to start with 8-12 loans each. After 2-3 years, as loans are paid off, new loans will be given in the same villages.

RESOURCES
1. FINANCIAL: Our funding in the last 3 years shows growth and positive trends. Our donor retention rate has gone from 35% to 50% to 75% in the last 3 years respectively. Our large donors over $10,000 increased from 10 in 2012 to 14 in 2013. We added 89 new donors in 2012 and 206 new donors in 2013. Our donations in 2012 totaled $489,000, and in 2013 totaled $659,000. These trends along with minimal budget increases should ensure our ability to grow and support all existing and future programs.
2. ADVISORS: Our advisors have provided a wealth of knowledge and guidance for our small staff. Their advice on fundraising, legal matters, finances, networking and marketing has allowed our small staff (only one full-time and 3 part-time as of Jan 2014) to have exponential and focused impact.
3. ADVOCATES: Our donors that have converted to advocates have galvanized existing and new donors around our goals and objectives. Through trips, events and meetings they have propelled our cause and increased awareness.

CAPACITIES
1. GENERAL: While this has been a significant challenge in the last 3+ years, we are actively prioritizing and addressing it.
2. INTERNATIONAL: Our three international directors have had very lean staffing, with most of them only having 1-2 full time staff support in the headquarters office. In 2013 we added 2 more full time office staffers, and intend to increase this more in the years to come.
3. USA: As of January 2014, our total USA staff was one full-time Executive Director and three part-time staff. In the next 1-2 years we plan to add a Co-Director to assist with development and donor relations, and a Communications Director to oversee media and communications. This will allow the Executive Director to shift more focus to international oversight, while still maintaining key donor relationships and casting vision for the organization.

CONNECTIONS
1. PHILANTHROPISTS: In the last year our Executive Director has been mentored by 3 of the top 4 philanthropists in the Indianapolis area. They are contributing time, wisdom and funding, but also connecting us to other donors, organizations and advisors.
2. DEVELOPMENT: Our development consultant has introduced us to organizations, development education programs and even donors. One of our donors is also a successful development director at a large organization, and volunteers with us to provide insight, call donors and connect us to potential donors.
3. BOARD: We are planning to double the size of our board in 2014, with 2 confirmed for January and 2 more planning to join in the second quarter. These new board members bring new connections and potential donors to our organization. We have already begun to plan new potential donor meetings arranged by these new (and existing) board members.

FINANCIAL AND RELATIONAL
1. TRACKING REPORTS: Monthly, Quarterly and Annually we track funds raised, funds spent, number of gifts, average gift amount, new donors, recovered donors, new child sponsorships, new pastor sponsorships, new micro-loans, grants applied for, foundations added, new cultivations, new USA churches added (donors), and donors that have moved from one (of four) tier to a higher tier.
2. BOARD: Our board meets 5 times a year and looks over these tracking reports and strategizes and brainstorms next steps for improvement.

FIELD WORK
1. OVERSIGHT: Each of our international directors provides a monthly report with field stories, program changes, constituent changes and additional information. Our Executive Director stays in weekly (sometimes daily) contact, and meets with them face to face 2-4 times per year. Program growth is tracked and regularly discussed. Every January the international directors are provided with an annual review to cover areas of success and weakness.
2. PROGRAMS: Each of our programs are tracked regularly. To meet our 5 year goals, these indicators will show that we are on track:
a. 20-30 pastors trained each year and as many churches planted each year.
b. 50 new children added to our program each year.
c. 10-20 new micro-loans launched each year. As they are paid off (2-3 years), new loans will be issued.

ORGANIZATIONAL HEALTH
If all of these indicators are on track but our organizational health is deteriorating, then it will likely be impossible to attain our goals, much less survive as an organization. Per Patrick Lencioni's book, The Advantage, our Board and Executive Director will track our health in four key areas:
1. A cohesive leadership team. Build trust, eliminate politics and increase efficiency.
2. Creating clarity. Minimize the potential for confusion.
3. Over-communicate clarity. Align employees around organizational clarity by communicating key messages through repetition, simplicity, multiple mediums and cascading messages.
4. Reinforce clarity. Ensure consistency in our hiring, managing performance, rewards and recognition and employee dismissal.

1. PLANT CHURCHES
a. 25 pastors were trained in 2013, and 25 churches were planted.
b. Over 150 pastors and many of their wives attended our 2013 Pastors' Conference.

2. CARE FOR CHILDREN
a. 50 children received new sponsorship in 2013, and funding for the orphanages and programs increased in 2013.
b. 80% of the funding for the India orphanages has been received. Funding for the new Nepal orphanage has been committed and is expected to be received in April 2014.
c. Our Nepal Children's Director is finalizing plans for the new children's school in West Nepal.
d. 100 children have been added to our orphanages and programs in the last two years.

3. FIGHT POVERTY
a. As of January 2014, our new HOPE Fund Director is providing support and oversight for the existing 30 micro-loans and ensuring that they are paid off on time.
b. This new director is also ensuring that all paid off loans are renewed with new recipients.
c. In 2013 we raised funds for a new micro-finance village that was launched in January 2014.
d. We have averaged over $5,000 per year raised for micro-finance, allowing us to start 8-12 new loans per year). As loans have been paid off (2-3 years), new loans have been offered.

External Reviews

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Financials

ServLife International, Inc.

Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable